100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 29, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY s

--

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF-MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, gbo ; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but 'as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
nsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR.............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor ..............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor ......... .... .... .w...J..3 A. Bernstein
ditorals.............Lee Woodruff, L. A e, T. . Whinery
Assistant News ....E............. -- . P.ovejoy Jr.
Sports... .................................Robert Angel
Women's Editor............................ ary D. Lane
Telegraph..................................West GaIlogly
' elescope........ ................,... .Jack W. Kelly

Josephine Waldo
Paul G. Weber
Zlizabeth Vickery
G. IE. Clark
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Harry B. Grundy
Frances Oberholtzer
Robert E. Adams
George L. Stone

Assistants
Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace F. 'Elliott
Leo J.Hershdorfer
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
]. A. Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
J. W. Hume, Jr.
Byron Darnton

M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P., Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Waller
H. E. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND ,i. GAINES JR.
Advertising.......................D. P. Joyce
$lassifieds...................................Robt. O. Kerr
Publication........... "........................ F. M. Heath
Accounts.................................... E. .RPriehs
Circulation. ............................ V.-F.- illery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gowera F. A. Cro'ss R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Motule D. G. Slawson
J. J. Hame~l Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

d . , ... ....:...r. ,'

ence meets require, nor to develop his powers to
the degree they might reach with time.
Every freshman of athletic promise ought to be
on the job as a tryout. What is more, the rest of
us ought to see to it that all entering men of any
kind of athletic ability get busy at once. We should
not let them run the risk of becoming physically
stale. Such a procedure can do the men them-
selves nothing but good; and it may mean greater
things in the future for Michigan athletics.
T HE PLAYERS' CLUB. DEBUT
Judging by the liberal praise given the four one-
act plays through which the Players' club made its
debut, Michigan's newest dramatic organization has
every advantage of a good start. Aside from the
skill ii] acting and producing displayed, its inter--
pretations of work by leading playwrights give
strong assurance that the club will be fully able to
cope with the more difficult problems incident to
carrying out its aims.
A successful Players' club will mean much to
Michigan. Briefly the organization's plans are aimed
to foster interest in the University in the higher
forms of drama, with'plays produced by students
from start to finish as its ultimate objective. If
its ideal is realized, Michigan will have drama en-
tirely its own, made up of plays written, acted, and
presented in every way by University students.
The assistance the plan offers those wishing to
accompany academic instruction in the theater with
"practical work" is easily appreciated. Students
who are interested in writing plays, acting, and so
forth, find in it the invaluable advantages of the
laboratory method of study which is the keystone
of instruction in Michigan's professional schools
and which is of no little importance in the theatrical
wo rid.
The logical results of the Players' club plan are
a better grade of drama at Michigan and the de-
velopment of more players and playwrights among
the student body. At present the organization is
demanding the undivided attention of its members.
Great things can be expected of the club if it ad-
heres to its program and preserves the spirit of
serious work that has so far characterized its un-
dertakings.
One Ann Arbor fire department, at the great con-
flagration Thursday night, proved that while the
city water-pressure isn't strong enough to break a
window it at least can raise one.
Did everybody notice in Friday's Daily how the
homoeop hospital looks under quarantine?
The Telescope
Dear Noah:
Don't you think that "unique" is a very good word
to use in describing Ann Arbor. C. D. E -
Yes, very appropriate. The word unique, as we
understand it, is derived from two Latin words,
uno meaning one, and equus meaning horse.
In substantiation of our oft repeated declaration
that true poetry must follow rhetoricalprinciples
as to proper and logical sequence, we submit the
following. Part of this we made up out of our
own head and even then had enough material left
over to make a kitchen table.
'Twas a bright May night in November,
So dark one scarce could see
The street car 'tying at its moorings
On that calm and storm-tossed sea.
"'Tis love that makes the world go 'round,"
How oft these words are spoke,
But the same phenomena are found
By mixing ether with coke.
The Near Humorist "
The bird who, when you ask him if he's taking
poly ec, replies, "No, Idon't have anything to do

with those co-eds."
Paging Mr. Adam
NEW WOMEN'S BODY TO BE FORMED.
- Columbus Citizen Headline.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson j
(Eastern Standard Time)j
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. M.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m., and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. mn. To. Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

NOW

"6The

cate

THE ORIGINAL HOME OF
HOME COOKED MEALS,
STATE St. at HICL St.
I~L

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES

AND DESK CALENDARS
AT

GRAHIAM'S

JANUARY
S 1i T W T

2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31-
men:

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
24'
27

F S
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29

11

This is Final

Last season's hats turn-

Both

Men's Brogue Oxfords and Shoes
CORDOVAN AND SCOTCH GRADE

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all now trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

I

$15.00
16.00
17.00 J

at $10.00

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night. ______________
--
SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1921.
Night Editor-JOHN I. DAKIN.
THE BUSY SIGNAL
The busy man is seldom pressed for time. He
can always manage to squeeze in a little work in ad-
dition to the regular routine. This holds good at
Michigan as well as it does anywhere else. The
man who studies conscientiously and still finds time
to enter into the constructive side of what is com-
monly termed "College Li.fe" is seldom too busy to
step in and boost for some -projected program of
real value.
On the other hand, the man who never does
much in the line of study and less in student activi-
ties or committee work is constantly howling about
how busy he is. He barely succeeds in snatching
time for meals. He is always in a hurry to get to
Huston's or the Union billiard room. He tears
frantically about from this appointment to that date
and from the "Maj" to the Arcade. He "fusses"
or plays cards until early morning so that his sleep-
ing hours are badly cut down. When he does man-
age to steal a few leisure minutes, he spends them
royally in lounging in some soft chair, preferably
within easy reach of the match-box anid the deck of
cigarettes.
If he be asked to serve on some committee by a
harassed chairman, his invariable answer is. "I'm
too busy." Likewise this breed is generally too
busy to find time for study. A "C" grade is to
them of equal merit to an "A" grade in the mind of
the honestly studious.
There are all too few of us in the first class and
far too many in the second. It's up to us to take
down the "Too Busy" sign and get to work. It
pays in the end.
COME OUT THE FIRST YEAR
When the high shool graduate comes to the Uni-
versity 'for a college education he does not expect
to complete the work and fit himself for coapeti-
tion with the world in less than the prescribed four
years. On the contrary, he matriculates fully ex-
pecting to spend the required time here, if he is at
all seriously intentioned, and he realizes that a col-
lege training cannot be obtained in a few months
or even in one or two years.
We are, however, inclined to confine this con-
ception of training to the intellectual alone and to
forget that it applies to physical development just
as well as to mental. It is no more possible for the
man of even good athletic ability to come to col-
lege, let athletics go for the first year or possibly
the first two years, and then expect to make of
himself a first rate college athlete than it is possi-
ble for the high school graduate to get all that he
might get out of college in one or two years. Both
require time, if the individual is to make the most
of his opportunities and to develop himself to the
greatest possible degree.
The fact that so many men let their track work
slip for their first year or two before placing them-
selves under training is an important complaint
which Coach Farrell has to make of his material.
When a man waits until his junior or senior year
before reporting as a tryout, even though that man
may have a good deal of ability, it is seldom pos-
sible to make him into the class of athlete Confer-

O PEN

SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL
Ready to Serve
AT ANY TIME
Open from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of rice
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
85 CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Style
Short Orders
Quan 'T urg Lo
614 LMberty at I.
-PAI DING
*- , Athletic
Equipment
For Every
Indoor
f And
Outdoor
Sport
Catalogue on request
A. G SPALDING & BROS.
211 S. State St., Chicago, Ill.

Cordo Calf and Vici

$12.00

13.00
14.00

- at $8.50

I

I

DAVIS TOGGERY SHOP
119 So. Main St.

!.'

WINDOW SHADES

PICTURE FRAMING

Student Headquarters
We carry complere stocks of "Brighten-Up" finishes in small .size
cans for all "touch-upr' jobs around the house.
PAINTS VARNISHES BRUSHES WALL PAPER
ENAMELS KALCIMINES STAINS GLASS

L. E. WENZEL

Painting and Decorating

ANN ARBOR PRONE 84
207 EAST LIBERTY

YPSILANTI PHONE 171
114 PEARL

Ii , i

Wagner Quality

NECK WEAR

Down in the mouth,
And feeling blue,
Bereft of joy and life -
Remember Jonah, he was, too,
And he came out all right.

7 C1

$2.00 1.13$2.50

Bootlegger-Did that whisky I sold your room-
mate for his cold straighten him out all right?
Stude-It sure did. We buried him today.
Tip to the Boardinghouse Keepers
The next time any of the boarders are quite satis-
fied with the menu, remark casually.:
"Can any of you tell me the difference between
a chicken dinner and a mess of prunes?"
When all give up and admit they can't tell you
the difference, remark in the same casual tone:
W.ell, if none of you know the difference, Ix
guess I might just as well serve the prunes as
chicken."
Famous Closing Lines
"Much ado about nothing," he muttered as he
listened to the lecture on the interrelation of space
elements.
NOAH COUNT.

I

$3.00-$3.50

A complete line of beautiful silks, the
kind that have made our reputation for
tasty men's wear.

WAGNER & COMPANY
State Street at Liberty
Established 1848

E1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan