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January 29, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-29

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THE WEATHER
NOT MUCH CHANGE IN
TEMPERATURE

4hr ir

Iatu

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHIT WIRE
SERVICE

...t,

VOL. XXXI. No. 87.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1921.

PRICE FIVE

PRC -"

GERMANINDEMNIT
PAYMENT ARRANG6E
BY LLIED COUNCIl
ONLY REMAINING BUSINESS I
TO SETTLE DEFAULT
I PENALTIES
AGREEMENT PRECEDED
BY MUCH DISSENTION
Reparation Committee Entrusted wit
Duty of Fixing Amount of
Indemnity
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 28.-The session of th
committee of experts of the Allie
council ended at 12:30 o'clock thi
morningrafter having reached a corn
plete agreement on the system of an-
nual payments of reparation by Ger-
many and annuities on Germany's for-
eign trade.
It now remains only for the plenary
sitting of the Supreme council to en-
dorse the agreement, draw up instruc-
tions for the Brussels experts and fix
penalties for default by Germany.
Premier Briand declared, as he
came from the meeting early this
morning that the conference of the
Supreme council would not break up
without having reached a definite de-
cision.
Payment Provided
The scheme provides for the pay-
ment of annuities on a sliding scale
of from 2,000,000,000 to 6,000,000,000
gold marks over a period of probably
42 years and also a 12 1-2 per cent ad
valorem tax on German exports, so
that her creditors will be paid accord-
ing to Germany's increasing prosper-
ity.
The sudden ironing out of differ-
ences came after two days of a con-
tinually widening breach that threat-
ened to break up the conference, it
being virtually suspended except for
private conferences. Official French
circles gave the Belgian delegation
credit for the success in reconciling
the British and French viewpoints.
Germans to be Iivited
The project in its final form, when
approved by the Supreme council will
be submitted to Germany for accept-
ance as an agreement outside of Ar-
ticle 233 of the peace treaty which en-
trusts the reparation commission with
the task of fixing the amount of the
indemnity. Then another conference
will be called to which the Germans
will be invited.
The committee of experts tonight
considered the question of shortening
the period of the payment to 30 years
for which the treaty of Versailles pro-
vides, but it is expected that the period
of 42 years finally will be adopted, as
the whole agreement is outside the
treaty and the longer period of pay-
ments will make the task easier for
Germany.
REGENTS TO BE ASKED MONEY
FOR UNIVERSITY ART ACTIVITY
"We do not wish the Board of Re-
gents to grant the Ann Arbor Art as-
sociation $1,000 annually, but to set
aside this sum for University activ-
ity along the line of art exhibitions
and lectures," said Prof. Emil Lorch,
of the architectural school, last night.
The statement was made in regard to
a report of Librarian W. W. Bishop's
committee, which was adopted by the
association Wednesday. The recom-

mendation is to be presented to the
Regents ai their next meeting.
"Although the association has suc-
seeded in bringing many good exhib-
itions here, we have been compelled to
charge admission for them to defray
expenses. This has caused many stu-
dents to stay away when they might
otherwise have attended. It is the de-
sire of the association to make these
things free to the public, and this
would be accomplished by the fund."

Y

DANCE PROCEEDS
TO SWELL FUND

Proceeds from the Matinee dance t
be given under the auspices of th
Student council from 2:30 to 5:3
o'clock this afternoon in the Unio
assembly hall will be added to th
Foreign Relief fund. No tickets fo
the affair have been placed on sal
S on the campus, and every one will b
accommodated at the door. The ad
mission charge will be 25 cents, giv-
ing the privilege of one dance, an
. each additional dance ticket will cos1
10 cents. After each dance the foo
will be cleared.
h (Continued from Page One)
Actors Overcome
Difficulties With
aSkill And Effor
(By Ren Sherwood)
Inadequate facilities and a shriek-
ing radiator were overcome by the
earnest efforts and sill of the mem-
bers of the Players' club in their
second presentation of four one-act
plays last night in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hail.
The utterance of mature sophis-
tries by amateurs, which results so
often in toleration from those of the
audience not intimately acquainted
with the players, was neutralized by
the ease and presence of H. E. Rosen-
thal, '21, and the poise of Amy G.
Loomis, '22, in "The Marriage Has
Been Arranged." Rosenthal's pleas-
ing voice and maturity could have
been used to better advantage in the
.second play, "The Open Door," and his
characterization of a middle-agedmil-
lionaire could have been more easily
enacted by L. C. Crocker, '18, who
took the part of the nobleman in the
second play.
By merely being "college" "J. P.
Holden, '22, fulfilled accurately the
requirements of an unthinking son,
whose actions are contrasted by the
love of his wife, Kathryn C. Prakken,
'21. The women taking the leading
parts were well commented upon by
the audience, especially Amy Loomis,
who did justice to her role as a wife
resigned to her fate. That those in
charge of making-up the characters
were anxious to prove their ability
was shown by the contrast in the
complexions of Mrs. Parton and Bar-
bara and Mrs. Ollivant and Mary.
And if presentations of last even-
ing may be taken as an indication of
what the Players will do, of a sample
of what is to come from them, a
better hall than Sarah Caswell An-
gell and more appropriate settings
than only curtains and two-lamps are
needed to set off with fairness the re-
sults of honest endeavor for the best
in drama.
EXTENSION SPEAKERS ADDRESS
AUDIENCES THROUGHOUT STATE
Prof. W. D. Henderson, of the ex-
tension division, addressed a public
meeting last night at the Community
theater at Centreville, Mich., on "The
Re-discovery of America."
"Instincts" was the subject of an
address given by Prof. C. H. Grif-
fitts, of the psychology department,
before the Woman's club last night
at Battle Creek.
Prof. C. O. Davis, of the education
department, addressed a public meet-
ing last night at Webberville, Mich.,
on "Centralized Schools."
Holstein Bull Travels De Luxe
Albert Lea, Minn., Jan. 28.-When
Ormsby Sensation, a Holstein bull
calf, recently sold for $40,000 to Ju-
lius Schmidt of New York by an

Ellendale man, left for his new home
in the East, he traveled in a special
passenger coach. His "passenger"
fare was $1,500.
The sides of the coach were padded
so the bull could not bump his val-1
uable head and a man servant was
his constant attendant.

HOUSE KNOCKS OU9T
IRISH RECOGNITION
Illinois Republican Offers Amendment
To Salary Minister to
Erin
PROPOSAL THROWN OUT ON
GROUNDS OF NO AUTHORITY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 28.-Indirect rec-
ognization of "the Republic of Ire-
land" was knocked out in the house
today on a point of order.
During consideration of the diplo-
matic appropriation bill Representa-
tive Mason, Republican, Illinois, a
member of the foreign affairs commit-
tee, offered an amendment providing
a salary of $10,000 for a minister to
Ireland. Instantly half a dozen rep-
resentatives were on their feet. t
Chairman Rogers of the sub-commit-D
tee on appropriations in charge of the
bill, challenged the right of the housea
to include such an amendment, on thef
grounds that it was without authoritye
of law and that there had been noa
executive recognition of Ireland. I
EDUCATION SOCIETY TO
INSTALLCHAPTER HERE
"is
LOCAL BRANCH OF PHI DELTAo
KAPPA WILL BE FORMED -
IN MARCH k
Phi Delta Kappa, national honorary
education fraternity, will install ab
chapter at Michigan in March. Prof. 1
J. B. Edmonson and Prof. G. M. Whip-
ple are on the arrangement commit-a
tee. The new chapter will have 25B
charter members of whom some are
now in school and others, who have'
graduated since the application for an
charter was made, are now scattered
throughout the state.
Chapters of the fraternity are to be
found in nearly all of the leading n
Eastern universities and in many of
the Western schools. Among the Con-a
ference schools Iifiana, Chicago, It-t
inois, Ohio State, Northwestern, Iowa,
and Minnesota are represented. The r
purpose of the fraternity as stated in e
the constitution is "to support thep
a
iighest educational ideals and to en-
courage unswerving allegiance to the
principles underlying American pub-
lic education." Three ideals which
he fraternity is trying to perpetuate
n itself are research, service, and N
leadership.
"Many of the greatest educators of
he country are members of the fra-
ernity," said Professor Edmonson
resterday. "William S. Gray, dean of
:he education school at the Univer- i
ity of Chicago, is the national pres- c
dent. We are expecting great things d
rom the organization during the next a
ew years." a
DETROIT WOMAN ENDURES
3,800 MILES OF HARDSHIPS o
-- -. d
Miss Olive Fenton, of Detroit, re- h
ently finished a 3,800 mile motor- a
ycle trip from Detroit to Los An- i
;eles, California. Two months were p
;pent on the trip, during which time
ill manner of hazards from mud to J
lesert sands were encountered by p
dIiss Fenton and her motorcycle. h
d
Buzz! Buzz! Carnegie Band in the Air

TWith a dot and dash program of
musical numbers, and intermittent
buzzes and sparks for applause, the d
student band of Carnegie Technical e
nstitute will give a_ wireless tele- t
>hony concert on the night of Feb. c
11, which will be heard all over the d
ountry.
This is a novel stunt, and gives to n
he Carnegie band the honor of being o
he first college band to utilize the air o
waves for musical concerts. A

MICHIGAN TANKMEN
SWAMP CINCINNATI
(Special to The Daily)
Cincinnati, JTan. 28.-Michigan's In-
formal swimming team scored an1
overwhelming victory over the Uni-
versity of Cincinnati tonight at the
latter's pool. The final score was 55
to 13, the Wolverines taking first
places in every event and second in
all but three.
The relay was the closest event
of the evening, the Michigan anchor
man finishing a scant two feet ahead
of his opponent. The 40-yard free
style was also closely contested. Sev-
(Continued from Page One)
Mason To Give
Piano --Lecture
Recital Sunday
"The Listener's Share in Music" is
the subject of Prof. Daniel Greor)
Mason, of Columbia university, in a
piano-lecture recital at 3 o'clock Sun-
day afternoon in Hill auditorium. Pro-
fessor Mason comes under the auspic-
es of the University School of Music
and takes the place of the regular9
Faculty otcnert
Analyzes Music
Professor Mason is one of the lead-
ing American authorities in this field
and his explanatory and analytical
talks accompanying his recitals areE
of great value. He comes from a fam-
ily of musicians, being a grandsont
of Lowell Mason; his father, Henry
Mason, was the founder of the well
known Mason and Hamlin Organ andI
Piano company.
His compositions have been frequent-
ly performed in Europe and America
by many of the great orchestral con-
ductors. He first became known as
n author when his "From Grieg tot
Brahms" was published in 1902. His
'The Appreciation of Music" writtens
n collaboration with Thomas Whit-I
ney Surette has been adopted as aa
ext book in many leading colleges.
Frequent Lecturerr
In conjunction with his work in 1
music at Columbia university, Profes-
or Mason has lectured at Harvardi
university, the University of Chicago,
nd other leading educational institu-c
ions. He has given over 250 lectured
recitals for the New York board of
ducation. His faculty of making his
oints clear to the ordinary listener
s well as to the trained musician has
nade hiswork particularly valuable
n developing a taste for good music.
i USUNU O WOUNDED
WOMN STILL MISSINGb
fl
Mrs. Lula Henry, colored, is lying "
m the University hospital with little o
hance of recovery, her four-year-old t
aughter, Virgina, has disappeared, v
nd her husband, who was last seen a
bout 6 o'clock yesterday morning,
- still missing. o
Mrs. Henry was found with wounds n
n her head about 9 o'clock yester- p
ay morning. She was taken to the I
ospital and late last night was still %
live but unconscious. No possessions d
n the house were disturbed except a
ocketbook, which was found rifled. L
Soloman Haskins and Juius
ames, negroes, are being held by the
olice as these men were reported to
ave visited Mrs. Henry late Thurs- h
ay night. p
S

Detroit Policemen Good Marksmen c
Detroit, Jan. 28.-Nine armed ban- I
its were killed and 22 thieves wound- c
d by Detroit police during the last C
three months of 1920 at an estimated N
ost of $10 each, according to police
epartment reports.c
In disposing of the 31 men police- (
men used approximately $310 worth c
f ammunition, either in the shootings
r in target practice to fit themselves 1
or duels with bandits. r

FOREIGN RELIEF CAMPAGlN EXTENDED
TILL TONIGHT; TOTAL EXPECTED TO
REACH 88,000; WOMEN GIVE HEAVILY

RELIEF MOVIE
A special performance featur-
ing Thomas Meighan in "The
Prince Chap," will be given at
10:30 o'clock this morning at
the Majestic theater. All pro-
ceeds of the performance will be
turned over to the University of
Michigan foreign relief fund.
The admission will be 25 cents
for adults and 10 cents for chil-
dren.
FORSYTHE SPONSORS
HEALTHEXAM PANS
The requirement of a medical ex-
amination for every person entering
the University before being accepted
as a student, is part of the plan to
promote and safeguard the health of
the student body, which is being pro-
jected by the Health service. Dr. For-
sythe, director of the University
Health service, will present the plan
to the University administration
shortly.
Among the other parts of the plan
is the requirement of a medical con-
sultation with every student at least
once a year, and the giving of a re-
quired, accredited course in health
instruction to all freshmen.
In commenting on these proposi-
tions, Dr. Forsythe said that taking
care of the sick students was the
smallest duty of the Health service.
He continued, "If these proposals are
adopted we will be able to keep some
record of the students' health and to
prevent a great deal of sickness. The
University has adequate facilities to,
give every entering student an exam-
nation before he registers." He also
stated that the Health service invited
constructive criticism from the stu-
dents on these propositions.
S'axop hone lBarred
At Union Dances
The funeral procession has passed.
the chant of the last sad rites has
been heard. Nothing is left but the
Bolding of burial services.
For the moaning saxophone has
reathed its last at Union dances. Of-
Icials have placed thereon a firm
taboo." Instead of a battery of sax-
phones and trombones in the orches-
ra which are said "to strike you down
with their blare," stringed instruments!
Nill again bid for approbation.
Depleted by the loss of several sax-
phones, the orchestra has added two
nore violins, a bass viol, another
iano and a banjorine. This is strict-
y according to "down east" style
where the wailing saxophone has been
iscarded, it is said.
LOCAL MERCHANT RECOVERS
GOODS STOLEN BY EMPLOYE
Merchandise to the amount of $400:
as been recovered by Edwin J. Lohr,
roprietor of Davis Toggery shop on
outh University avenue, through the
o-operation of the New York and
Ann Arbor police forces. The mer-
handise was tolen by Roswell S.
Clark, a former employe of Lohr, and
was sent to New York by express.
Clark failed to call for the trunk
containing the merchandise, and
Thief O'Brien, of the local force, re-
Iuested that the trunk be sent here.
When it was opened much of the ap-

parel was untouched and as good as
new.

PERSONS
TO

NOT SOLICITED AS
CONTRIBUTE AT
UNION

LAST NIGHT'S TOTAL
INCREASES TO $6,096
Newberry Residence Tops Donor List
with $300; Team Reports
Wanted Today
Since a large number of solicitors
have not been able to see all the men
on their lists, the campaign for the
University Foreign Relief fund will
continue until tonight. All workers
are urgently requested by the com-
mittee to see all their men today and
to turn in the money before this
evening.
All persons in Ann Arbor who have
not been solicited for the present
campaign may make their contribu-
tions today either at the cage in the
Union or one of the offices of the
Farmers and Mechanics bank. Women
may turn in money between 10 and 11
o'clock this morning at Barbour gym-
nasium. After 11 o'clock they are
asked to turn contributions in at the
cage in the Union.
The grand total of the campaign
reached $6,096 last night. It is ex-
pected that the campaign will net
close to $8,000 when all reports have
been turned in to the committee.
The showing made by the women
was again the outstanding feature of
the campaign yesterday. Newberry
residence topped the list with $300.
Incomplete returns from Martha Cook
dormitory amounted to $202, while the
contributions from Betsy Barbour res-
idence totaled $116. Delta Delta Del-
ta sorority subscribed $121. Mar-
guerite -Clark, '21, Bernice Nickels,
'21, and Alice Hinkson, '21, were in
general charge . of the campaign
among the women students.
PLAY REHEARSALS
PLEASE DIRECTOR
Plans for the Comedy club's per-
formance of "Bunty Pulls the
Strings," which will be presented
March 9 at the Whitney theater, are
well matured, according to Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson, under whose direc-
tion the play is being given. The cast
has now had more than three weeks
of daily rehearsals.
Professor Nelson says that the pres-
ent. cast has taken hold of its work
with a greater enthusiasm than that
of any previous year. "At the end of
two weeks they were playing the first
two acts with real effect and without
their books. In the meantime stage
designs for both sets have been made
and plans perfected for their execut-
ing in Detroit," said Professor Nel-
son.
The generous support given last
year's production of the club, "Alice
Sit By the Fire," has made the club
feel justified in staging and costum-
ing the play this year more liberally
than before. The costumes are be-
ing made by a New York house.
Senior Lit Breaks Ankle in Gym
Robert W. Kneebone, '21, broke his
ankle last night while playing in an
intramural basketball game at Water-
man gymnasium.
ORGANIZATIONS
All organizations must hand in
copy for the Michiganensian by
today.

_ ...,

iew

TODAY
2O3-500

TODAY
2:30-5:30

11

CHARITY

D A N C E CHARITY

For$helknefitof STARVING EUROPEANS AND CHINESE

Michigan Union

Thisspace donated by The Michiga. Daily

Ceorge Rogers' Spotlight Orchestra
(DONATED)

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