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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 28, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

........... wo-

i

%L NEWSPAPER OF THE Ul
01F MICHIGAN
every morning except Monday c
e Board in Control of Student Pt

RSITY
the Univer-
ions.

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the upe for
tion of all news .dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news published therein.
:red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor Michigan, as second
tter.
cription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
,es nn Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
ds: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
munications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ot necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
id notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
n of the Editor, ifleft at or mailed to The Daily office.
d commniiations will receive no consideration. No mani-
,vill be returned unless. the writer incloses postage.
Daily n does not necessarilyendorse the sentiments ex-
n the communications.
at's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
vening preceding insertion.
EDITOiI1AL STAFF
Telephone 2414
ING EDITOR .........GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR.
itor ..................... essr M.Campbell
T.H. Adam., H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. CmpbellJ. ElMcManis
J. I Daknpbel T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood. . . A. Bernstein
editor... ................JA.ersen
.-.- -. ---. -Lee W oodruff, L. A. Ktrn, T. J. W hinery
News................................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
.. ..... .... - .R obert A ng ell
E 1ditor........................ .......Mary D. Lane
h................ -West Gallogly
\.............. ....Jac W. Kelly
\Assistants ,

alde Thomas E. Dewey
er Wallace Y. Elliott
ckery Leo J. Hershdorfer
flughston McBain
del Prank H. McPike
nfort J. A. Bacon
-undy W. W. Ottaway
holtzer Paul Watzel
d ms 3."W. flume, jr
one By ron Darntonl

M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Bleata Hasle$'
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
. William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Wailer
H. E. Howlett

Mo0
eGr
Ober'
.St

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
INEsS MANAGER ....,....LEGRAND XGAINES JR.
tisii.g .I.....--.. .. . Joyce.
.fies.~..........................N. .o. 0-Kerr
lotion . . ...... ..... . M. Heath
"unt .m .. .E . R. Prich
un .. . . ....... ...V. F. Hillery
Assistants
51 ,itnbreclt P. H uthinson NI. W. Robertson
. Gwer F, A. Cross R.,C. Steres
""d vKunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
r W. lillatd M. M. Moue D. G. lwson
namel r. D. S. Watterwortb R. G. Burchell
e..,
Persts' wishing to secure information concerning news ior any
qf Vhe Daily thould see the night editor, who has full charge
f s to he printed that night.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1921.
Night Iiditor-THOMAS H. ADAMS.
SEND FOUI MENTO M. L T.
fen a conferenee of representatives of the va-
Anetrican universities and colleges is called
the purpose of discussing problems of under-
bate govenent and student activities, it is to
Anterest of every such institution to avail itself
o portunity by sending its delegates to at-
that cpnvention. Michigan is among those
ersities which/has been asked to send four men
he conference. at the Massachusetts Institute of
nology next spring but as yet only one organi-
>n, th Student,council, has selected one of its
1bers tDo represent it as the student governing
; of the University.
he ,musical clubs and dramatic organizatis of
schools represented are expected to send a dele-
wht may learn from and exchange with the
r representatives ideas on the staging .of an-
productions, the managemnent and financing of
, and th e successful organization of dramatic
eies. Michigan certainly -cannot lose by ap-
ting 1 delegate of this kin. He would, of
use, be named by the Union. Fiurthermore, -an
>rtant section of the convenfion will be given
to discussion of athletic organization, with the
0tion of bringing out what is the best division
pqwers /and uties of faculty, students, and
ni/ in the control of sports. Michigan ought
ave in this section a representative peculiarly
d to bring out our views and to argue, if pos-
for a general standardization of rules of eligi-
v throughotit the United States. The varyng
dards of amateurism which now exist hOt only
demoralizing to the' best interests of college
ti but make it impossible to judge fairly of the
:ive ability of teams in different sections.
Sgers"and proselyting deserve to be hit hard,
Michig'an, through a representative of the Ath-
'ssociation' should be given a chance to do the
rig.
inaly, the ]3oard in Control of Student Publi-
>ns should see to it that a delegate with a broad
of corditions in the news, comic, annual, and
trtment pulication fields at Michigan is ap-
ted to gain allthat the conference can provide
ew ideas along journalistic lines. This is our
ice to get a nation-wide view of student organ-
on progress, and we'should take advantage of
y phase of it - music and drama, athletics, and
ications as well as student government.
HEAVEN PROTECT JAZZ
(From the Daily Illini)
i this da* of 'gitation for sweeping reforms in
y conceivable direction, when rock and rye have
retically been placed on the skids, when Lucy
nGaston is stamping up and down and across
nation crying death to the pernicious cigaret,
when pious brethren are clamoring4 for the re-
.llation of the Sunday Blue laws, we tremble
next somebody will fall upon our beloved in-
tion of jazz music with serious intent at de-
ring it.
ready the rumbling of dissatisfaction has been
d in certain quarters, already there have been
:y of evil flings taken at the American toler-

ance and tie even widespread popularity the wicked
saxophone, trombone, piano, banjo and drum com-
bintions are enjoying. We should not be surprised
to hear at any imoment of the formation of the
American anti-jazz society, fully equipped with a
printing press for spreading its doctrines to the
worldly public, and of its dispatching delegates for
lobby work in Washington bent on securing a twen-
tieth amendment that would consign jazz harmo-
nies to a warmer climate - (to quote the probable
petition itself) - "from whence they came."
We sincerely hope a a constituent of a college
undergraduate body, that this will never happen.
Much as we are able to see the possibility of it.
It would be a hard blow from which we college
mlen and women might never fully recover. We
mean that. No matter what the self-confessed
aesthetists in our midst tell us to the effect that we
are degenerating due to the influence of demoral-
izing jazz syncopation s we cling frantically to it
like addrowning rat does to the top of his sub-
merged cage.
A college existence without jazz would be like a
child's Christmas wthout Santa Claus. It would be
empty, boresome, unendurable, exasperating. We
couldn't stand it. For jazz conglomerations are
second nature to us now. We have them after every
meal in every fraternity and boarding house, on
scores of phonographs during the off hous of the
morning, at the movies in the afternoons, and even-
ings, at the games, in the music shops, at the dance
halls, and wheever they stop everywhere else we
tune up our vocal chords and warble them for our-
selves or pucke, our lips and whistle them.
Jazz has been with us so long now, has won our
appreciation in such bountiful quantities and has
made itself so perpetually useful that we could not
digest our meals without it. Without the assur-
ance of jazz from September to June it would be
folly to matriculate. Heaven protect jazz.
SWIMMING GETS A START
Tonight Michigan's informal swimming team
will take to the water against the University of Cin-
"innati natators at the Ohio city. From past show-
ings of this year, there are promising indications
that the Wolverine squad will come out on the long
end of the score,though the U. of C. boasts one
of the best squads in this part of -the country. Be-
fore the Maize and Blue tank artists leave for the
North again they will go into another meet on Sat-
urday afternoon with the Cincinnati Y. M. C. A.
The fact that Michigan's swimming team is get-
ting into outside competition of the sort that it will
run up against this week is encouraging in that
iA marks just that much growth in the standing of
the sport with us. The necessity, however, of our
having to go outside for all our contests is unfor-
tunate. If it were possible for the students here to
see these contest in which our informal team par-
ticipates, no doubt swimming would soon be on a
very much higher plane with us than at present.
It is a fascinating sport and it seems only unfor-
tuate the Michigan men cannot witness their own
tank squad in action. This is, of course, impossi-
ble under the lack of facilities - but 'that's just
one more argument in favor of the Union pool.
The news comes from Manila that the Sunday
Blue laws were enforced for three weeks on Sulu.
The natives thereupon took six days a week for re-
covery. "Human nature is the same the world
over."
A proposed law in Oklahoma makes snoring ille-
gal. Thank: the Lord our "Ec" course lectures are
not held in Oklahoma.
Tj-he -Teleope
In assigning lessons for the week,
I often think the profs are wrong -
Instead of being for the weak
They're intended for the strong.

Our Daily Novelette
A look of dogged determination mixed with un-
controllable fear was written on the man's counten-
ance as. he stepped into the bathroom. He made a
mental prayer that he would be given the courage
to carry out his resolution, even in the face of an
almost over)owering desire to shrink romn the or-
deal.
And still he wondered why he dreaded doing this
so much. Other men, no stronger than he, with no
more will power, had summoned up sufficient cour-
age to do this same act, to bear the same suffering.
He tried to console himself by reflecting that in a
few moments he would have nothing to fear - it
would all be over with. He gazed as one fascin-
ated at that shining piece of steel.
He felt its keen edge. Then nerving himself to a
supreme effort he raised it and placed it with a
shaking hand against his skin. With a hand that
trembled visibly he, drew it once across his throat.
He could 'feel the blood trickling. He drew it once
more across his throat. Yes, he would make a good
job of it this time.- A man might just as well learn
to use a safety razor at one time as another.
Famous Closing .ines
"There is no redress now," said the stude as he
noticed he had on the wrong pair of trousers on his
way to an 8 o'clock.. NOAH COUNT.'

DETROIT 1UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann' Arbor and Jaelkson
er(Estern Standard Tisme)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. mn, and hourly to 9:10 p. mn.
Limiteds, to Jackson at 8:48 a. mand
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and eery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m.. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.n., and 1:15 a.n.
Locals to Jacks on-7 :50 a. mn., and
12:10 p.m, -
JANUARY
S M T W T F S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15i
16 17 18' 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
39 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

_--F

This is Final
Men's Brogue Oxfords and Shoes
CORDOVAN AND SCOTCH GRADE,

$15.00
16.00

atf $10.00

0

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES,
AND DESK. CALENDARS
AT

Both

17.00

Cordo Calf and Vici
$12.00
13.00 at $8.50
14.00
DAVIS TOGGERY SHOP
119 So. Main St.

End s of the Diagonal Walk

p

Try Daily advertising and
your business grow.-Adv.

watchI

Patronize Daily advertisers.-Adv.

I

,,

Halsey s

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START NEXT FRIDAY
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Hear The Melrose Melody Boys
Tickets at Grahams Meyers or both Studios

SPECIAL FEATURES EAC H WEEK

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