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January 27, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- .11

MICIIGAN DAILY

V

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
rear by the Board in Control'of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
the Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
lication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ed in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
ubscription by carrier or mail, $3.50"
offices: Ann Abor Press building,.Maynard Street.
hones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
2ommunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
e not necessarily to appear in print but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published-in The Daily at the
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
gied communications will receive no consideration. No man-
pt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
the Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ed in the communications.
What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
e evening-preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
Editor.............................Chesser M. Campbell
tEditors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. t. McManis
J. I. Dakin T W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
ty Editor........................ A. Bernstein
jals............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. Whinery
:ant News .... ...... ..................E. P. Lve oy Jr.
.. ....... .......................Robert Angell
en's Editor...........................MaryD. Lane
raph............................... ..... West Gallogly
ope ............................ -...Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
ine Waldo Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klavet
G. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
eth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
Clark Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
e Reindel Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
th Mnfr ] .Bacon 'Gerald P. Overton
. Grundy . W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
s Oberholtzer Paul Watzel . William H. Riley Jr.
t E. Adams J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
L. Stone Byron, Darnton H. E. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 980
SS MANAGER........LEGRANID A. GAINES JR.
.g.................................. D. P. Joyce
n .....-................ot. 0. Kerr
........... ................E. R. Priehs
.... . .................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
aambrecbt P. R Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
,wer F. A. Cross R. C. Stearntes
Kunstidter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
P. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
nel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

pleased. The easy way out, possibly the only way
out, is to say that tastes differ in humor just as
they do in that famous trilogy, "Grape juice, women
and song."
TAKING THE BAIT FROM DEBATE
At the recent Central league debate the new plan
of non-decision contests was given a trial. Perhaps
it is a little too early to form an opinion with re-
gard to it. On the other hand it is never too early
to try to avert a mistake about to be made. No
doubt it is a very worthy theory - this idea that
the audience can get more instructive ideas fro-i a
debate where- no decision is rendered than in one
where judges decide the winner. However, the first
experience would seem to teach us otherwise.
Those who attended the Central league debate
this year must have been struck with the singular
lack of interest that prevailed throughout the audi-
ence when comnpared with debates of other years.
Since nothing was at stake, the listeners scarcely
paid any attention at times. 'There were few in the
audience who knew whether objections raised on
either side were answered
One of the objections raised to a decision debate is,
judges are too frequently prejudiced in favor of
one side or the other. It looks as if an open forum
at the end of such a debate would cause the judges
to be more careful in order that their decisions
might not be proved wrong. Debates in the past
have had few enough followers. Let us not kill
debating entirely by removing one of the primary
interests in it. We would not think of enduring
,no-decision athletic contests. Why should we be
satisfied with it in debating contests? Why take the
bait from debate - the competitive feature which
draws the audience? I
HOPE-
Anyone who traverses the campus these days
or mingles with students is apt to hear this expres-
sion : "I hope I pass my finals." All of us hope
the same. Many of us hope to make a million dol-
lars before we get too old to spend it. Rockefeller
at some time in his life doubtless cherished this
latter desire; he worked, and converted it into a
reality. Many others who would have liked to be-
come millionaires are now found in the poorhouses.
Our long-suffering news department recently re-
ceived two communications, one of which was in
Latin and one in Spanish. They have not been
printed; and to the authors we have only to say:
Si un hombre no puede escribir la lengua de ceux
qui lisent ses idees, vale yeas que no escriba du
tout - quod erat demonstrandum.
Here's the best joke we've heard in a long while:
The editor of Technic has just sent a copy of Tech-
nic to the editor of the Gargoyle.
The Telescope
Excelsior!
I'd rather be a could be,
If-I could not be an are,
For a could-be is a maybe
With a chance of touching par.
I'd rather be a has been
Than a might have been by far,
For a might have been has never been,
But a has was once an are.
What has become of the old fashioned humorist
who used to be crowned king of the merrymakers
by pulling this one:
"Have you seen May?"
"May who?"
"Why Mayonnaise."
"No, she's dressing and won't lettuce."

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
GRAHAM'S

Both

Ends of the Diago nal Waik

s
W e

DETROIT UNITED LINES I
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05,a. mn., 7:05 a. mn.,
8:10 a. i., and hourly to-9:10 p. m .
Limiteds to Jackson at 8&48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.mn., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. ,m,, and
12:10 p.m.
JANUARY.
S M T, W T F S
1.
2 8 4 5 d 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21. 22
23 24 25 28 27 28 29
80 31
Men: Last seaison's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just lik}e new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1.792.

I
1
a

J. L. CH APMAN

I. m .1

1!--

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of Reliability & Satisfaction
113 South Main Street
ANN ARBOR, - - MICHIGAN

Sleep Anyplace V t
Lat at Rex's-
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard

ti

..

II

1

This is Final
Men's Brogue Oxfords and Shoes

$15.00
16.00
17.00

at $10.00

4

W. L
G.Go
mnund
ster W
J. Ham

I1

Cordo Calf and Vici
$12.00I
13000 Iat$50

,

Persona wishing to secure information concerning news for any
se of The Daily should'see the night editor, who has full charge
all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1921.
Night Editor-B. P. CAMPBELL.
NOT DOING OUR SHARE
Reports from the campaign now under way on
e campus tQ, secure funds for the relief of starv-
g millions abroad show that while the returns
on{ some quarters have been good, others have
en failing to come up to the standard prescribed
en by the small size of the amount which we have
en asked to raise.
The requirements of the starving millions in
iina and Europe are great and should be met with
llingness, but we as Michigan students are not
lding up our part of the job. We who have not
perienced the extremities of privation and of
int, can never fully appreciate the need, but that
no reason for letting our part of the relief work
de.
During the first two days, reports of the cam-
ign, as nearly as could be estimated, showed that
uile the women and the faculty members were up-
lding their part of the quota assigned in good
ape, the men students were not being as liberal
th their money as the demand requires.
Certain it is that few or none of us have hurt
rselves financially in giving to the various causes
r which funds have been solicited this year, and
have no right to overlook a cause of such im-
nse proportions and such great and immediate
uirements as this one. We have been given a
ota to raise which is smaller by far than the
ounts assigned to many other universities, and
t we are only meeting it to date in a half-hearted
y.
[t's up to Michigan to make a broader reckon-
, get a new grasp on the good old quality of hu-
nity, and assume her share of the burden.
TASTES IN HUMOR
Stephen Leacock's lecture at Hill auditorium las
ek demonstrated that we do not all appreiate the
ne type of humor. -
Kis audience was one of the largest of the year
i the laugh that greeted his opening sentences
wed that his hearers were with him. They had
ne to laugh. But some of them did not laugh
ntaneously throughout the whole lectue. There
re a few who were frankly bored, numbers of
ers laughed unrestrainedly at his sallies, and the
ante enjoyed part of the evening's humor and
sed up the rest. Oddly enough, the only portion
the lecture which might by any stretch of the
gination be called questionable was the best re-
red.
Indoubtedly Leacock has a talent for satire of
broader kind which is strongly backed by his
ity to act. Nevertheless his satire missed fire
e after time. The fancy of some was highly
led.at the spectacle of an idiotic young man re-
ig impassioned statistical information into the
of a beautiful young matron who found this
r.method of love-making entirely satisfactory.
ers were highly elated over the movie scenario
ch. None can deny that ludicrous exaggera-
abounded to the great delight of many.
o say that those of us who did not laugh are
ing in a sense of humor would be unfair, just
would be to say those who laughed are easily

PHONE 166
TRUBEY
218 SOUTH MAIN
QUALITY ICE CREAM
Caters to Fraternities and
Sororities

DAVIS TOGGERY SHOP I
119 So. Min t.

m

Little gobs of powder,
Little dabs of paint,
Make the little freckle
Look as if it ain't.
Our Daily Novelette

The curtain was just falling .qn ,the first act as
she swept majestically into her box. Impeccably
gowned from the crown of her well coiffured head
to the tip of her dainty shoe, she fairly radiated
that intangible something which only true breeding
and environment can impart.
II
That she had one of the marks of true refine-
ment, consideration for the feeling of others, was
evinced by the fact that she talked verylittle dur-
ing the course of the opera. Surrounded by an
ill-mannered, chattering . crowd she loomed up as a
beacon of gentility in a sea of coarseness.
III
Toward the end of the performance I saw her
point rather scornfully to the prima donna. Doubt-
less, I thought, the overacting of the latter had of-
fended her aesthetic tastes, was jarring -to one of
her fine sensibilities. Unconsciously I leaned for-
ward to catch her words. Her patrician lips were
curled a little disdainfully as she again pointed to
the leading lady. Her words reached me very dis-
tinctly: "Say, dat dame wid de pink kimona tinks
she's de whole show, don't she?"
ramous Closing Lines
"I've got no kick coming," said the gentleman
with the gout. NOAH COUNT.

,

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