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January 27, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-27

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I

THE WEATHER
IUNSETTLED; CLOUDY
TODAY'

r Sitk

:43 atl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
PAY AND NIGHT WIR]
SERTICE

VOL XXXI. No. 85. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1921. PRICE FIVE C

Rabbi

Wise

Challenges

Hob b's

Assertion

a .

STANDBS READY TO
l PULPIT'IF
STATEME1NTS TRUEl
SPEAKER ASKS THAT COMMITTEE
OF FACULTY MEN JUDGE
CASE
SAYS AMERICAN'S ONCE
MORE HYPHENATED

TWO ENGINEERING,
CLASSES TO MEET
There will be a meeting of junior
engineers at 8 o'clock Friday in room
348 of the Engineering building. Prof.
A. E. Wood, of the sociology depart-
ment, will address the meeting.
It is necessary that all members of
the class attend, as important busi-
ness is to'be transacted.
Clarence 'V. Hubbell, C.E., '93, city
engineer of Detroit, and former city
engineer of Manilla, P. I., will speak
before the sophomore engineer as-
sembly at 10 o'clock Friday morning
in room 348, Engineering building.
GiVE FUR PLAYS

Denounces Papers Agitating War
tween England and U. S. as
Hostile to Country

Be-I

Devoting the opening part of his
speech last night in Hill auditorium
to denials of statements concerning
charges made against him by a mem-
ber of the University faculty, Rabbi
Stephen S. Wise offered the following
statement to the large audience which
filled the assembly hall.
"I see bybthe papers that one Pro-
fessor Hobbs of the University of
Michigan has published a statement
to the effect 'Rabbi Wise was both a
pacifist and a pro-German, and has
made use of his pulpit for -German
propaganda.'
.Pople Know
"I do not deem it necessary to re-
ply to any charges made against me
by Professor Hobbs to the effect that
I have used my pulpit for German
propaganda. I could safely leave the
matter of Professor Hobbs' charge
to the judgment of the American
people, which, I venture to believe,
knows where I stood and what was
the character of my service to Amer-
ica during the war, and to the Allied
cause from the beginning, in August,
1914.
"None the less I shall not let the
matter rest here. Professor Hobbs
will be given an opportunity to prove
his statement. If his statement be
true, I am unfit to be a teacher of
my people, and I shall withdraw from
the pulpit of my congregation. If Pro-
fessor Hobbs' statement be untrue, as
it will be shown to be untrue, then
it will be a business of Professor
Hobbs to withdraw from the faculty
of the University of Michigan
Will Hobbs Resign?
"I suggest that the President of the
University, the hospitality of which
has been outraged by Professor
Hobbs' reckless, unsustainable and
libelous charges, name a committee of
five or seven persons to pass upon
the matter. If in their judgment Pro-
fessor Hobbs' charges are justified, I
am ready to resign from my pulpit.
If they are proven to be false, will
Professor Hobbs be ready to resign
his professional place in the Univer-
sity, which his conduct wil have dis-
graced?
Would Go to Court
"If Professor Hobbs refuses to ac-
cept this suggestion, I propose to
bring the matter to a court of jus-
tice, where it will be necessary for
him to prove that he has spoken the
truth about me, or stand condemned
as a mendacious and malignant li-
beller."
Then, proceeding with a discussion
of the subject which he had announc-
ed as his theme for the evening's lec-
ture, "Americanization, True and
False," Rabbi Wise stressed the im-
portance of Americanization in the up-
building of our national character.
Good Will Necessary
"Americanization must rest on the
foundation of good will, sympathetic
understanding and forbearance. The
business of America is to act togeth-
er and to think apart. Regulariza-
tion, however, I deplore as the dis-
ease of America, a malady which
would have us think alike and act
alike.
"Two years ago we Americans were
more optimistic, more hopeful, than
we are today, and finally we become
an undivided, hyphenless people. Now
but two years have passed and the
country is again divided - the hy-
phen is with us again."
Took Mental Vacation
That Turkey must keep her hands
off Armenia, and that America,
(Continued on Page Eight)

Works

of George Middleton and
Alfred Sutro Will Be
Presented

PERFORMANCES TONIGHT WILL
MARK.CLUB'S PUBLIC ADVENT
Four one-act plays, two by George
Middleton and two by Alfred Sutro
will be given by members of the Play-
ers' club at 8 o'clock tonight in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. This will be
the first public presentation of the
new club's work.
The program, which, is varied - and
cA considerable length, will start with
the presentation of "The Open Door,"
one of Sutro's comedies, played by L.
C. Crocker, '18, and Amy S. Loomis,
'22. H. E. Rosenthal, '21, and Olga
M. Jonson, '21, will form the cast of
"A Marriage Has Been Arranged,"
also by Sutro.
Casts Well Trained
Following the presentation of these
two plays, "Mother," by George Mid-
dleton, will be acted by a cast made
up of Josephine Shaffer, '21, J. P.
Holden, '22, and Kathryn C. Prakken,
'21. "Traditions," one of Middleton's
greatest dramas, which was originally
produced in 1913 at the Berkely thea-
ter in New York with Fola La Fol-
lette in the leading role, will be in-
troduced to Ann Arbor audiences
with R. S. Tubbs, '21, Lula North,
grad., and Lucille L. Cobb, '21, play-
ing.
According to Prof. Richard D. T.-
Hollister, director of the Players'
club, the casts have been chosen and
trained with utmost care and the pro-
gram is of high quality enough to
warrant the support of the student
body and the general public.
Playwrights Leaders
The playwrights, George Middleton
and Alfred Sutro, are dramatists of
unusual ability according to leading
contemporaries. Critics in discussing
Mr. Middleton's best works attribute
to him a remarkable understanding
of feminine characters and ideals. His
recent plays are "Polly with a Past,"
"The Cave Men," and "Adam and
Eva." Mr. Sutro has devoted most of
his energy to the writing of comedy
and he is recognized as a leader in
this field.
The program will be repeated Fri-
day evening. Admission to the gen-
eral public will be 50 cents.
DISEASES PLACE HOMOEOPATHIC
HOSPITAL UNDER QUARANTINE
Three days ago a suspicious case of
throat trouble was discovered in the
Homoeopathic hospital and a quaran-
tine immediately placed upon the main
building. Since then, two patients
have developed the disease and there
are one or two suspected cases. Yes-
terday morning the children's ward
was also placed under quarantine
when chicken pox developed there.
Harold Titus, '11, Writes for Red Book
"The Caution of Abner Rowland,"
a story of the Great Lakes, which ap-
pears in this month's Red Book, is
the work of Harold Titus, '11, former
editor of The Daily. Titus was a cor-
respondent of the Detroit News while
in the University and has since con-
tributed to various newspapers and
magazines.

REPARTON TOPIC
AT ALLY COUNCI L
Status of Former Russian States Given
Attention at Private
Conferences
LETVIA AND ESTHONIA TO
BE GRANTED RECOGNITION
(By Associated Press)
(B soitdPesParis, Jan. 26.-Members of the
Allied supreme council spent most of
the day in a private conference dis-
cussing reparation. The two meet-
ings of the council were devoted to
hearing the statements of the French
minster of finance, M. Doumer, on
reparation, considering the status of
former Russian states.
It was decided this afternoon that
Letvia and Esthonia -shall be recog-
nized as sovereign states. Action re-
garding Lithuania and Georgia was
deferred pending further informa-
tion.
It is -expected that Georgia's repre-
sentatives will be heard during the
present conference of the council but
the decision with regard to Lithuania
may be delayed until the result of the
League of Nations plebiscite in the
Vilna'region is known.
Reparation will again come before
the council tomorrow, along with the
military expert report on disarma-
ment. The French attitude as out-
lined in M. Doumer's exposition on
the subject before the council, is that
the Allies should insist upon fulfill-
ment of the treaty of Versailles so
far as reparations are concerned. -
PRESIDENT ILL, CANCELS
ENGAGEMENTS FOR WEEK.
President Marion L. Burton has
been forced to cancel all of his ap-
pointments for the remainder of this
week because of an attack of pharyn-
gitis. He was taken sick Tuesday aft-
ernoon and since that time has been
confined to his bed. It is expected
that he will have to remain away from
his office for two or three days more.
A conference with the administra-
tive faculty of the Medical school
scheduled for yesterday was called
off. Other engagements cancelled in-
clude an address before the teachers of
high school and intermediate classes
in the Detroit Central high school this
afternoon and a talk to Detroit alumni
at 8:15 o'clock tonight in the Board
of Commerce auditorium in that city.
President Burton was to have spok-
en to the Business Mens' club and the
University Alumni association of Sag-
inaw tomorrow. He was also to have
attended a conference of University;
presidents in Chicago Saturday.
BARBOUR GYMNASIUM TO BE
SCENE OF ARCHITECT'S PARTY
Because of the refusal of the Union
to permit the use of the assembly
hall for the annual Architectural May
party, the event will be held May 6
in Barbour gymnasium. Students in
the architectural department are
planning to make the party in every
way an equal of the one last year,
which was characterized by vivid col-
or and elaborate decorations.
CANDIDATES FOR FRESHMAN

BAND WILL TRY OUT TONIGHT
Tryouts for the Freshman band will
be held at 7 o'clock tonight in Uni-
versity. hall. This organization, sim-
ilar to the one of last year, will be
used to supplement the Varsity band
in the spring and offers an excel-
lent opportunity for a position on it
next year.
Arkansas Negro Mobbed and Burned
Osceola, Ark., Jan. 26.-Henry Low-
ry, negro, charged with the murder
of E. T. Craig, and his brother at
Nodena, Christmas day, was burned to
death by a mob tonight on the Missis-
sippiriver levee near the Craig plan-
tation.

LECTURE ON MUSIC
TO BE GIVEN HERE
Prof. Daniel Gregory Mason, of Co-
lumbia university, will give a lecture
recital on "The Listener's Share in the
Concert" at 3 o'clock Sunday after-
noon in Hill auditorium.
Professor Mason is one of the most
authoritative lecturers on this sub-
ject and is the author of several
works on musical appreciation. He
has also made important contribu-
tions along the line of history and
criticism.
He comes 'from a distinguished
musical family, for his grandfather
was Lowell Mason, and it has been
said. that he has proven himself
worthy of his ancestry. He has writ-
ten several orchestral works and
many songs. In the near future his
sonata for violin and piano is to be
heard here.
DEM OCRATS yDENY
FILIBUSTERCHARG
Show Willingness to Vote on Fordney
Tariff Bill After "Proper and
Legitimate" Debate
BELIEVE WILSON WILL VETO
MEASURE IF IT IS PASSED
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 26. - Republican
and Democratic senatorial leaders
met in head on collision today when
the former started a drive to put
through the Fordney emergency tar-
iff bill.
Republican suggestions of the Dem-
ocratic filibuster brought on the
clash, Senator Underwood of Ala-
bama, minority leader, and other
prominent Democrats denying vigor:
ously that filibusteing was in prog-
ress or contemplated. The Democrat-1
ic leaders expressed willingness to
vote after "proper and legitimate"
debate and charged that the Repub-
licans did not expect the bill to pass
and sought to place the blame on
Democratic opponents.
Democratic Leader Underwood add-
ed that the measure even if passed
would be vetoed by President Wilson
because, he said, it was "repugnant"
to Democratic tariff principles. He
disclaimed having received any direct
information from the President, how-
ever.
After hours of a spirited verbal
scuffling, interspersed with some ac-
tual discussion of the bill's tariff
schedule, the Republicans scored a
real point by forcing a recess of the
senate until tomorrow instead of ad-
journing, which operates to keep the
bill before the senate consideration
immediately tomorrow to. the exclu-
sion of other usual routine business.'
FIRE DAMAGES CONFECTIONERY;.
OTHER BLAZES EXTINGUISHED
Between $500 and $1,000 of damage1
was done by a fire which broke out
in the Fountain of.Youth confection-
ery store on the corner of Liberty and
State streets about 12:30 o'clock yes-
terday afternoon.
It is thought that the fire was caus-
ed by the boiling over of a candy
kettle in the rear of the store. The;
entire stock of the candy factory
which wasdstored in the back of the
store was destroyed.
There were also two small roof
fires on Hill street, which were both

extinguished by chemicals with very,
little damage.
MUEHLHAUSER CONTINUES TO
SHOW SIGNS OF DIPROVEMENT
August C. Muehlhauser, '23, the
student who was shot by a police of-
'ficer last Sunday morning, is resting
comfortably and if no complications
develop may be expected to be out of
danger soon. The pain following res-
piration which bothered Muehlhauser
for the first 24 hours after he was
shot is considerably lessened.
Jacob F. Fahrner, the prosecuting
attorney, has announced that no ac-
tion will be taken unless further de-
,velopments warrant it.

MICHIGAN RELIEF FUND- DR/YE
SHOWS TOTAL Of 82988.671AT.
END OF CAMPAIGN' S5ECONOD D

SENIOR NOTICE 2
Seniors who failed to return
or fill out senior record blanks
at time of having picture taken
for Michiganensian must call at
the photographer's where pic-
ture was taken and fill out same
before Thursday.
All organizations must hand in
copy for the Michiganensian by
Saturday, Jan. 29.
GAIES ISDEEGATE TO
CONFERENCE AT, MaI.Ts

COUNCIL
UNION

TO GIVE DANCE AT
FOR CHARITY FUND
DRIVE

LeGrand A. Gaines Jr., '21E, pres-
ident of the Student council, was
elected Michigan's delegate to the
Intercollegiate Conference on Under-
graduate Government to be held at
Massachusets Institute of Technology
on April 15 and 16. It was voted at
the meeting last night of the Stu-
dent council that Gaines' expenses be
paid by the council. Fred Petty, '21,
was elected alternative delegate.
Fitzhugh L. Brewer, '21, was ap-
pointed by the council as chairman
of the dance which will be given Sat-
urday afternoon at 'the Union under
the auspices of the council to raise
funds for the drive for the starving
Europeans and Chinese. The dance
will be of the nature of a mixer, pro-
ceeds to go to the University fund for
the drive.
It was voted by the council that
freshmen should wear their pots six
days a week, Friday and Saturday
nights included" Married freshmen
are strongly urged to wear their pots
while on the campus.

WOMEN STILL CONTRIBUTE MORN
FREELY THAN MEN ON
CAMPUS
D.ANCE AND SPECIAL
SHOW WILL AID WORI
Donations of $500 and $100 Receive4
From Red Cross and Detroit
Chinese Merchants
With but $2,986.67 turned in to th4
headquarters of the Michigan relie
fund at 10 o'clock last night, the comn
mittee in charge of the campaign ex
pressed the opinion that the solicitor
must redouble their efforts today a-
tomorrow if the goal of $15,000 is t
be reached by Friday night.
Two large contributions, were re
ceived yesterday, one of $500 from th
Ann Arbor chapter of the Red Cros:
and one of $100 from the Chinese mer-
chants of Detroit. The Red Cross is
merely turning in this amount whic'
it had raised through the channel oi
the Michigan relief fund.
Misunderstanding
Solicitors report that some members
of the faculty when approached wer-
under the impression that a campaig':
among the townspeople was to be helc
at a later date for Chinese relief. Prof
Henry C. Adams, wh is a member 01
the national committee of the Chines
famine fund, made the following state
ment yesterday: "There willbe no
generalV'drive among the people 1
Ann Arbor for the Chinese relief. Op.
portunity will be given all those whc
wish to contribute to do so throug
the local churches, clubs and business
men's organizations."
Women Average $3.00
Reports turned in last night indi-
cate that the women are contnuin
to respond to the campaign more gen
erously than the men. Eleven wo-
men's rooming houses and sororities
brought the total contribution from thE
women of the University up to $55
yesterday. To date the individual
gifts of the women have average
$3.00. -
Since there are still some 70 lists 01
independents which solicitors have
not called for, the non-professiona
fraternities will be asked to plac
three men apiece who have not hith-
erto worked on the campaign at the
disposal of the committee in ordej
that every man on the campus may be
given an opportunity to contribute.
Collection Taken at Maj
A collection was taken at the twc
shows of the Maestic theater last
night by women who volunteered foi
the purpose. The total amount thus
collected was $94.01.
F. L. Brewer, '21, has been placed i
charge of the dance which will be giv-
en Saturday afternoon in the Unior
for the benefit of the fund. An ad
mission of 25 cents will be charged
George E. Rogers, '21, with his or-
chestra will contribute the music grat
is. A special show will be held Sat
urday at the Majestic theater, all pro
ceeds of which will be donated to the
fund by the management.
All contributors are urged to weal
the ribbons which are distributed t
those who have given to the fund.
SENIOR LIT MEETING
The senior lit class will hold
an important meeting at 4
o'clock Thursday afternoon in
room 205, Mason hall. This
meeting will be of vital import-
ance to every member of the
senior lit class.

Senior engineers can pay their
class dues from 9 to 10 o'clock
any morning this week in room
306, Engineering building. Only
names of those fully paid up will
be placed on commencement in-
vitations.

I

OVER THE WIREJ

I

1 - 1

New York, Jan. 26.-Rev. William
P. Manning, rector of Trinity parish,
reputed the wealthiest in the country,
today was elected bishop of the Prot-
estant Episcopal diocese of New York
in one of the most exciting election
conventions in the history of the
church here. He will succeed the
late Bishop Charles Sumner Burch.
Washington, Jan. 26. - Arguments
for and against the resumption of
trade with soviet Russia were re-
ceived today by the senate foreign re-
lations committee, which also heard
charges that the state department ac-
tually was maintaining a blockade
against that country although tech-
nically none was supposed to exist.
Spokesmen for organized laborers
in many lines of industry appeared to
support the resolution of Senator
Frence, Republican of Maryland,
which would enable American firms
to accept gold of the old imperial
Russian government, which is being
offered by the soviet authorities in
payment for foreign goods. They said
resumption of trade would go. a long
ways toward relieving the present in-
dustrial depression which has thrown
more than 3,000,000 men out of em-
ployment.
Grand Rapids, Jan. 26.-The death
of Lawrence Hill, of Summerfield,
Michigan, an orderly at Blodgett hos-
pital here, late today, brought the
totalities from eating spoiled food to
three. Another employe of the hos-
pital, Joseph P. Allen, was said to-
be in a critical condition, while 18
others were suffering from the ef-
fects of the poison, the nature of
which has not been determined.

. ..

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