100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JANU.

_W_.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Unive'
ty year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use foI
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or. not otherwise
edited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Erntered at the postofiice. at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
less matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.so.
Offices: *Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ature not necessarily to appear in p rint,but as an evidence of
itht and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
icrtion of the Editor, if left at or meiled to The D~aily office.
Jnsignednommunications will receive, no consideration. No man
cript will be returned unless the writer in closes postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments :.-
ressed in the communications-
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
n the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
A elephone 2414
[ANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. bROPHY- JR
ews Editor..............................Chesser M. Campbell
ight Editors-
T. H. Adams H.EW. Iitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
1J, I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr
unday f E dertoditr. ,...j . "".". ... .A. Bernstein
ditorials..............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
ssistant News...............................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
ors. . .....................Robert Angell
Vomen's Editor...............................Mary D Lane
elegrapl....... ..............-..-.....-.......West Gallogly
elescope.............. .................. . .... Jack W,. Kelly

..._.

I

phine Walde
1 G. Weber
:abeth Vickery
E. Clark
rge Reindel
othy Monfort
"ry B. Grandy
ces Oberholtzez
ert L. Adams
ge L. Stone

Assistants
Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace F. Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorf'ex
Hughston Mc Rain
Frank H McPike
J. A. Bacon
W. Wt Ottaway
Paul Watzel
J. W. Hume, Jr.
Byron Darnton

M. A. Klave,
K. l2. Meis4
Walter Donnelly
Beata liasley
Kath rine Montgonie
Gerald P Oevert(,,
Edward Larobred
Willian H Rilh'
Sara W elle
H. tK Howlett

-t

RUSINESS STAtl
Tolf-pholle 960

) iN8SS MANAGER

dvertising
assifieds.:_
~cunts
rctllatiflf
igiriund Kulsra r~
P9Yrr \V Mlla.'
J. Hansel -Jr.

Robt E K11

l H lluichn''
F A { ros4
M M. Moule
, S: Wattearworti

R, G Burchell

_

Persons wishing to secure information conce ning news [or aS
issue of The Daily should see the =sight editor. whoc has full rhar:+
of all news to be printed that night
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 1921.
Night Editor-T. W. SARGENT, JR.
DRINKING
Early this fall President Marion L. Burton
called A meeting of the representatives of various
campus organizations. These men expressed the
belief that the student body would willingly obey
the dictates of the eighteenth amendment. They
promised to bring the attention of the groups they
represented to the fact that the matter had become
one of law violation. Many of them did so and it is
known that a number of organizations took action
to stamp out drinking among themselves.
However, the action of the representatives has
not been sufficient. Some students who were ac-
Customed to drinking to excess before the era of
prohibition have continued to do so, and others have
followed them. The climax came in the sad affair
of last week-end.
Face to face with the fact that the present situa-
tion is intolerable as a blight on the good reputa-
tion of Michigan, the many must take action to pro-
hibit for all time the excesses of the irresponsible
few. Whether the violators are unfortunate, wrong-
minded, or completely incorrigible has ceased to
have a bearing on the situation. The fact alone,
not the circumstances, is the thing which insidi-
ously makes its way to the tongues of the entire
nation by way of headline and news-story, leavino
its impress in a lumping of the entire university
community as lawless and lacking in moral fibre.
It has.been proved that the good offices of the Stu-
dent council and the promises of representatives can
only partially eradicate the evil. The one complete
solution is an enforcement code set up by the en-
tire student body and backed, as it is sure to be, by
the administration. There must be no exceptions:
relaxations of such a code. however fair to the in-
dividual will beunfair in the end to the greater in-
-terests of the University. Evidence of drunken-
ness should be the only proof required.
Here, in a university town, where people are
sunnosed to tlink straight and to the point. certain
students whose expenses of education are benw
partially defraved by the state have been con-
sciously abetting violation of the law by their de-
mand for liquor. Totally anart from the morality
or immorality of the act of drinkinq n lrgiolic bev
ernfes i sense of duty to society should nrveit c
from inditloinp our tastes when those fast's are i
direct violation of the expressed will ad law of +be
rnaiority. Our country is suffering from a wave of
moral instability which threatens to put law and or-
der at naught. Every time any one of us violates
or winks at the violation of the prohibition amend-
ment, he is furthering the contemtuous disregard
of law which has already endangered many 'ov-
ernmental institutions abroad and which may at any
time do the same thing here in America. These
facts, dinned in the ears of every one of us time
and again, have anparently fallen unheeded before
the little group of violators whose unthinking acts
we must now bring to an end in the interests of the
entire ┬░University.
There could be no better object of the first great
student convocation than the setting up of an en-
forceable liquor code and the expression of our de-
termination to stamp out this menace.

WHERE IS MICHIGAN RADIO?
There was a time in the pre-war days of ama-
teur wireless when the University station over on
the Engineering building was nationally known.
Men who have in the past "pushed the key" on the
old set which represented Michigan in radio fields
still talk of the night in '16 when 8XA, as the sta-
tion was known, worked direct with Colon, Pan-
ama, and was called down for making too much
noise down there. But Michigan radio since the
war is apparently not what Michiganradio was
then. Among the authorities in charge of the ope-
ration of the set here the idea appears to prevail
that amateur communication is not progressive and
that participation in the affairs of the non-com-
mercial wireless world as promoted by such organ-
izations as the American Radio Relay league does
not make for efficiency and a promotion of the art
of etheric communication.
An adherence to strictly technical lines is all
right in its way, but it can be overdone. Amateur
experimental radio work in the past has in many
cases been the emans by which some of the most
useful and valuable discoveries and inventions have
been made in the wireless field. It is nothing to
be laughed at. The amateur is not merely a tin-
kering individual - he is a self-trained practical
scientist and has been responsible for many valu-
able developments in the radio field. For a uni-
versity or experimental set of any kind to be classed
. as a special amateur station is no reflection either
on its importance in the wireless field or on the
ability of its promoters.
Michigan's engineering department has a radio
station with a reputation, a station licensed by gov-
ernment officials as an experimental amateur set, and
yet its call is seldom heard any longer and almost
never counts for anything in the realm of commu-
nication. Much of the apparatus in use is of the
sort which was up-to-date before the war but which
now, with the many recent developments in equip-
ment, is not to be counted as the best by any means;
Of course, experimental work is being done in the
physics department along this line, but meanwhile
the old pre-war set continues towork under its old
pre-war call and accomplishes nothing.
Wisconsin has a station which works all over
this part of the countryhandles communication reg-
ularly, and pushes through weather reports and
time signals. The University of North Dakota and
others such as Washington university at St. Louis
are regularly making names for themselves and
ever since the time when 8XA here was "in her
glory" have been carrying on constructive work in
experimentation and communication. There are
possibilities for near-commercial work with such a
set as we have, for the handling of news dispatches
with other colleges to the mutual benefit of school
papers, and for experimental testing and communi-
cation. Why can't Michigan get back into the
radio game in earnest?
There are few finer shell-racing courses than the
pond above Barton dam. This would be a good time
for' embryo Kellys, Corbetts, and Wrays to make
a try for the inauguration of the great old sport of
sculling and crew-racing at Michigan.
The Telescope
The Tappa Kegs they had a pledge
Who warbled like Caruso;
A brother swung an iron sledge
And now he doesn't do so.
Dear Noah:
Why is it tha't it is much easier for a stout man
than a stout woman to lose flesh? Curious.
Probably because the stout men go to the bar-
ber oftener.
For the Better?
Showered with many socials, the fiancee of Har-
old W. Atkinson, Miss Marjorie Kuhn, is being
feted and made over. - DeQuincey Journal.

D'ja ever have the prof call on you
And be forced to say, "Unprepared, sir."
And all the while the kid volunteer
Next to you was wildly waving his hands.
And then when the prof finally called on him
You found out he didn't know any more than you.
Don't you feel kinda sorry for the poor fish?
Neither do we.
Strictly Non-intoxicating
First stude-Bill always wears an eye glass when
he crosses the campus.
Second stude-Why so?
First-So he can drink in the beauty of the girls.
Yes, Clarice, a girl who marries a block head
could properly be said to be celebrating her wooden
wedding.
"I HAVE REMOVED CORNS FROM THE
CROWNED HEADS OF EUROPE."
- A Chicago chiropodist's ad.
Help! 'Help! Help the Telescope!
That the Lord may help them
Is our earnest prayer and hope,
For those kindly souls, who
Contribute to the Telescope.
Famous Closing Lines
"Acting like one possessed " she muttered as she
saw her sorority sister proudly displaying her new
engagement ring. NOAH COUNT.

Both

.1

DETROIT ITuNITE LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jatkson j
(Eastern Standard Timie)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e ery two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit -5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. mn. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

Any way you look at it - whether from the
standpoint of purity, therefore safety; or from
the standpoint of food value, of genuine good-
ness; you are justified in ordering
:C R E A

2 3 4 5 4 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
Ren: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with' all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store,617
Packard ,t. Phone 1792.

I

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT -

G R' 'S

STUDY LAMPS

LUN C'H ROOM
A Nice Cozy Place Where
You Enjoy Your Meal
One half block South
of "MAJ"

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

I

JANUARY
S M T W T

and all kinds of

F S
1

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES

For

go to

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

PHONE 273

200 WASHINGTON ST.

In

" -

.

WHITNEY
FEBf. 2Z!A

SEATS BY MAIL
PLEASE ENCLOSE WAR TAX 10 per cant
BES-T S EATS ${2.50

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan