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January 26, 1921 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-26

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW; LITTLE
TEMPERATURE CHANGE

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:43ait j

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DRAY AND NIGHIT1111
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 84.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 1921.

PRICE FIVE

PRICE FIVE

r

INDUSTRIAL LABOR
REDUCED 37 PER'
KENT SINCE 1920
NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED
8,47,459 LESS THAN
YEAR AGO
GOVERNMENT FINISHES
NATIONWIDE SURVEY
Workers May Now Be Following
Other Pursuits Not Covered by
Investigation
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 25.-The number
of persons employed in industries in
this country the first of this month
numbered 3,473,456 less than the
number employed a year ago, the de-
partment of labor's employment serv-
ice announced tonight on the basis
of the first nation-wide survey just
completed by a special s ff of in-
vestigators.
Director John B. Densmore said
this figure did not necessarily repre-
sent the number of persons actually
unemployed as it was "quite possi-
ble" that some of the workers had
found employment in agricultural or
other pursuits not covered by the sur-
vey.
Number May Be Larger
On the other hand, some officials
believe the army of unemployed pos-
sibly was larger than the figures giv-
en as no 'effort was being made to
ascertain that reduction in the num-
ber of persons employed in pursuits
other than those classed under the
head of "mechanical industry."
The employment service figures
represented a reduction of 36.9 per
cent in the number of workers em-
ployed in industry as compared with
January a year ago, and it was an-
nounced that they were based "on a
consensus pf figures from neutral bod-
ies competent to furnish authorita-
tive information."
Michigan led the states in propor
tional reduction with 82 per cent and
Ohio and Indiana followed with a re-
duction of 50 per cent each. Next
came Illinois with 44 per cent; Con-
necticut with 43 per cent; Massacr-
setts with 38 per cent; Wisconsin 32
per cent; New York 28 per cent; and
New Jersey 22 per cent. Percentages
for the other states were not given.
Auto Industry Largest Reducer
The largest percentage of reduction
in specific industries, 59 per cent, oc-
curred in the automobile and acces-
sory industry and this was taken to
account largely for the great reduc-
tion in employment in Michigan. This
industry, the employment service an-
nouncement said, employed about 8
per cent of the total workers in all
industries in the country a year ago.
Second in rank in the reduction of
employes was the building trades with
approximately 52 per cent. Last Jan-
uary about 11 per cent of the total
industrial workers were employed in
this industry.
50 ROOMING CASES HEARD
AND ACTED UPON BY BUREAU
More than 50 cas"s of students de-
siring to change their rooms at the
end of this semester were heard and
acted upon at the meeting of the
University Housing bureau Monday

afternoon,
Any others who wish . to make
changes of rooms are reminded of
the University ruling which necessi-
tates obtaining permission from the
bureau before a change can be made.
Applications for permission to move
must be presented before Feb. 1. Two
more meetings of the board will be
held before that time, one from 2 to
i o'clock Thursday, the other from
8 to 5 o'clock Monday, in room 304
of the Union.
ETCHING REPRODUCTIONS
ON EXhIBIT IN LIBRARY
Reproductions of etchings from the
British museum have been placed on
exhibit for three weeks in the main
corridor of the Library. Works from
the Dutch, Flemish, Italian, French
and German schools are being shown.
The most illustrious artist whost
etchings are represented is Rem-
brandt, of the Dutch school.

DETROIT ALUMNI
TO HEAR BURTON
Detroit, Jan. 25.-Dr. Marion L.
Burton, president of the University
of Michigan, will talk to alumni at
8:15 o'clock Thursday in the Board
of Commerce auditorium on the ne-
cessity of added appropriations for
the University if it is to progress and
expand along the lines he has plan-
ned.
Members of the Alumni association
here look on Dr. Burton's address as
the most important public pronounce-
ment he will have made since he be-
came president at Ann Arbor. He
will suggest to them the specific ways
whereby they may aid in furthering
the expansion of the school.
Thursday at 3 o'clock Dr. Burton
will address teachers of high school
and intermediate classes in the Cen-
tral High School auditorium on #The
Function -of the High School." He
will be the guest of -Frank Cody, su-
perintendent of schools, at a noon
luncheon.
FORDNEY TARIFF BILL
RUNS INTO, FILIBUSTER

WISE WILL SPEAK
ON AMERICANISM
Is Said to Have Taken Great Interest
in Recent War Work and
Philanthropic Drives
ORATORICAL ASS'N'S SEVENTH
TALK AT 8 O'CLOCK TONIGHT
"Americanism, True and False" is
the subject whichrhas been chosen
by Rabbi Stephen S. Wise of New
York as the topic of his address at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
Rabbi Wise is the seventh speaker
in the lecture course being conducted
under the auspices of the Oratorical
association of the University.
Rabbi Wise took an active interest
in the recent war work and philan-
tropic campaigns in this county. He
is said to have worked in the ship
yards as a common laborer at the
same time, donating his wages to the
American Red Cross and other close-
ly associated organizations.
Rabbi Wise has had an exceedingly
active career both in church work
and in publications. He was found-
er and first secretary of the Federa-
tion of American Zionists and also
founder of the Oregon State Confer-
ence of Charities and Corrections. He
has been or is at present connected
with the Federated Boys' clubs of
America, the Peace society of New
York, the Equal Franchise society,
and the New York State Conference
of Religion. He is a member of the
editorial board of the Woman's Jour-
nal and an editorial contributor of
the "Survey."
He i. today one of the leading
church figures of the country. Im-
partial in his views and in all of his
addresses, he has stated his convic-
tions on the subject discussed un-
biased by any trend of popular
thoughts or emotions.
Prof. I. L. Sharfman of the eco-
nomics department will introduce
Rabbi Wise. A dinner in his honor
will be given this evening at the
Union by several members of the fac-
ulty.

WOUNDED STUDENT
BETTER LAST NIGHT
BULLETIN
The condition of August G.
Mulehlhausser P23 was reported
by the University hospital au-
thorities early this- morning to
be about the same. Little im-
provement in his condition was
noted either Monday or Tuesday.
August C Muehlhauser, '23, of San-
dusky, Ohio, who was shot by Patrol-
man Clark early Sunday morning,
was resting comfortably at the Uni-
versity hospital last night. "He is
rather better, but not yet out of dan-
ger," is the statement of Dr. Cabot, j
the surgeon who operated upon him
and who is in charge of the case.
Jacob F. Fahrner, prosecuting at-
torney, declared this morning that
circumstances surrounding the case
are being investigated, but that he
would not know for several days
whether circumstances would justify
prosecuting Clark.
TRACK MEN GATHER FOR1
ANNUAL PEP MEETINGI

CMPINSLCTNBEGINS; EARLY RETURNS INGOMPLEl
GOOD REPORTS EXPECTED TOI

I

TACTICS OF FORCING
CONSIDERED SOUND
OPPONENTS

DELAY
BY

TRACK SCHEDULE OUTLINED
DIRECTOR P. G.
BARTEL31E

BYI

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 25.-The Fordney
emergency tariff bill was brought in-
to the senate for consideration to-
day, but immediately ran into a small
but effective filibuster. Merits of the
bill and reasons for its early enact-
ment by the senate had scarcely been
outlined by Senator McCumber, Re-
publican, North Dakota, before Sen-
ator- Harrison, Democrat, Mississip-
pi, launched an attack which contin-
ued until adjournment.
The tactics in forcing delay of con-
sideration at this time were consid-
ered sound by opponens in as much as
the post office appropriation bill is
scheduled for tomorrow and several
other money supply bills are expected
to be ready when that measure is out
of the way. %
Class to Study International Relations
A class for the study 'of interna-
tional relations which is to meet once
every two weeks to engage in discus-
sion has, been formed by Prof. Jona-
than A. Hildner of the German de-
partment. Membership in the class
is limited to those affiliated with the
Cosmopolitan club. The text book to
be used is "Social Progress and Dar-
winian Theory" by George Nasmyth.
Prof. C. 0. Sauer Lectures at Bay City
Prof. C. O. Sauer, of the geography
department, spoke on matters pertain-
ing to northern Michigan before a
meeting of the Northeast. rn Michigan
development bureau last night at Bay
City. The lecture was given under the
auspices of the University Extension
service.
Allies to Call Greek-Turk Conference
Paris, Jan. 25.-The supreme coun-
cil of the Allies today decided to call
a conference of Allied representatives
with representatives of Greece and
Turkey in London at an early date to
settle the Near-East question.
Oregon Offers Dobie Lucrative Place
Eugene, Ore., Jan. 25. -- Gilmour
Dobie, football coach at Cornell, has
been offered $8,500 to coach football
at the University of Oregon, accord-
ing to announcement here today.

i

1

I

OVER THE WIRE

Washington, Jan. 25. - Republican
leader' In the house today gave their
approval of the program which calls
for the construction of five hospitals
for war veterans suffering from men-
tal and nervous disorders and tuber-
culosis. Representative Longley, Re-
publican, Kentucky, chairman of the
public buildings committee, announc-
ed he would introduce a bill appro-
priating $13,000,000 for such hospi-"
tals. He said assurance had been
given that it will be taken up for
passage by the house early next
week.
Florence, Ala., Jan. 25.-A plot to
exterminate the entire force of pro-
hibition enforcement officers operat-
ing in Northern Alabama has been
unearthed, according to N. L. Pierce,
state supervisor. Discovery of the
plot, he said today, followed the ar-
rest of all persons in connection with
the killing last Saturday of Don
Stephenson, a member of a prohibi-
tion squad, and the wounding at the
same time of two other officers. Mr.
Pierce declared there was reason to
believe that state and country officers,
as well as federal, were marked for
elimination.

Michigan's track athletes and those
interested in the sport gathered last'
evening in the Physics' lecture hall
for the annual track pep meeting. Al-
though the number present was rel-
atively small, the meeting may right-
ly be considered one of the best that
has been held. Each speaker carried
home his point to the track candi-
dates. Manager Richard Fischer,
'21E, acted as chairman of the even-
ing.1
Johnson Opens Program
Carl Johnson opened the programj
with an appeal to every man pres-
ent. "To make good at track, one,
must live track. Think it in every
thing you do," were his closing words
of advice. P. G. Bartelme, director of
the Athletic association, followed and
outlined the best schedule that any
Michigan track team has ever had.
Nothing has been left undone by the
association to obtain the best and
strongest comptition that it was
possible to arrange. "It is a sched-
ule deserving of our ability," said Mr.-
Bartelme.
On behalf of his team, Capt. Larry
Butler told of the grievances and for-
mer defeats that the men were out to
repay. What he expected of his men
as captain was forcefully presented to
them. In the principal speech of the
meeting, Coach Farrell appealed to,
every man to come out and work. As,
a prime requisite for a successful
year, the matter of complete co-opera-
tion among all the members on the
squad and the coaches was stressed.
Coach Farrell put the question of
training squarely up to the men and,
promised that every candidate would
receive the squarest possible deal.
Carver Speaks
In continuing the program, Prof.
H. C. Carver, of the mathematics de-
partment and star half miler on the
Varsity some years ago, urged the
men to put forth all that they had in
them. He brought home the point
that everything that is necessary for
a good track team such as coaches,
equipment, schedule, has been pro-
vided by the association and that it
is now up to the men themselves.
Particularly sound was the sugges-
tion made by former Capt. "Red" Don-
nelly that every man throughout the
year study his opponents or his
likely opponents in his own event. In
this way each could get a line on
what he would have to do to come
across with the necessary points. He.
also suggested preparing dope sheets
on all meets.
FIRE BREAKS OUT IN LARGE
COAL PILE AT POWER PLANT
Fire which broke out Sunday in the
large pile of soft coal at the Univer-
sity power plant continued to smould-
er Monday and Tuesday. The fire,
according to Edward C. Pardon, sup-
erintendent of the buildings grounds
department, was caused by spontane-
ous combustion and will probably con-
sume a large amount of coal before it
dies out. Lack of rocn for piling
:he coal in small piles has resulted
in a fire of this nature every year for
the past few years._

SENIO1 LIT MEETING l
The senior lit class will hold
an important meeting at 4
o'clock Thursday afternoon in
room 205, Mason hall. This
meeting will be of vital import-
ance to every member of the
senior lit class.
I I
"'WISE IS A BLIND ILEDR
NEW YORK TIMES EXCERPTSt
CITED TO S JPPORT PROFES-
SOR'S CHARGES,
Editor, The Michigan Daily:t
I note in your issue of Tuesday1
morning the interview with Professor
Trueblood. It is not my custom tot
reply to personal abuse, the last fivec
years having made me somewhat cal-
loused in this respect. It is quite oth-t
erwise. as respects attacks upon the
correctness of my statements. Thet
war record of ex-Senator BeveridgeI
can wait, but I should like to back up1
my statements concerning Rabbi Wiset
by the followiig extracts drawn from1
the files of the New York Times.
On Peace Sunday, Oct. 5, 1914, Rab-l
bi Wise had read from his pulpit a
prayer prepared by the pro-German.
Walter Rauschenbusch, which was in
part as follows:
"We thank Thee. O God, for the
firmness and sagacity of our President
and his advisers, which cooled ourc
own lust for war. * * * Grant our peo-
ple a sober and neutral mind, etc."
When GEmany's motif of propa-
ganda was that the war had been
caused by British secret diplomacy:
Rabbi Wise's statement was: "I blame
secret diplomacy for the present war."
(Times, Nov. 22, 1914).
A month later Rabbi Wise said: "It
was the duty of clergymen, schoolf
teachers, and the press to counteract
the influence being exerted to increase
the armaments of this country. War
preparedness is war provocation
* * *"'
When nearly six months after the£
sinking of the Lusitania, Mr. Wilson
had half-heartedly advocated a mild
national defense, Rabbi Wise "deplor-
ed the fact that President Wilson had
come put for n'tional preparedness."
(Times, Oct. 11, 1915).
Feb. 10, 1916, with the pacifiists Vil-
lard, Howe and others, he appeared
before the House Military Affairs com-
mittee to be heard against prepared-
ness.
(Continued on Page Three)
VIOLATORS OF TRADITIONS ;
PUNISHED BY COMMITTEE
Violators of Michigan traditions
were reprimanded or punished last
night at the weekly meeting of the
underclass conduct committee. TheI
chief offense was failure to wear the
freshman toque. It was emphasized
by members of the committee that the
toque is not intended as an indignity
but rather as a teans of promoting
good fellowship among members of,
the freshman class.
It is desired that the names, class-
es, and addresses of all offenders be,
turned in to them at the member-I
ship desk on the first floor of the
Union. R. Jerome Dunne, '22, repre-
sented the Student council at the
meeting.
LECTURE ON PALESTINE TO

BE GIVEN TONIGHT BY SWAIN
"Palestine from a Motor Car" will
be the subject of the illustrated lee-
ture to be deliv4Ted by George R.
Swain, assistant in Latin, at 8:15
o'clock tonight in Alumni Memorial
hall. The lecture is under the au-
spices of the Ann Arbor Art asso-
ciation and is free to members, non-
members will be charged 25 cents
admission. The annual meeting of
the association for the election of offi-
cers will precede the lecture, begin-
ning at 7:45 o'clock,

MORE VOLUNTEER CANVASSERS
TO DO WORK ARE
NEEDED
WOMEN GIVING MORE
GENEROUSLY THAN MEN
Proceeds of Special Movie and Union
Dance Will Go to Swe. .ng
Total Receipts
Active soliciting for the University
of Michigan relief fund campaign with
$15,000 as its goal began Tuesday.
Little data was available last night
on the progress of the campaign, since
the majority of the workers will turn
in their first reports today.
Early returns indicate that the wo-
men are responding more generously
than the men. Beginning this morn-
ing the amount raised each day will
be recorded on a huge thermometer
which will be placed in the entrance
to the Library. It is the aim of the
committee to make the mercury "g
over the top" by Friday night when
the campaign ends.
Gives 'Opportunity to Sere
More volunteer solicitors are needed
to do work among the independent
men. As President Marion L. Burton
pointed out in his address Monday,
the present drive presents a fine op-
portunity for anyone to perform a
real service to humanity.
None of the solicitors from the fol-
lowing organizations have reported at
the Union desk for their lists of men:
Triangles, Vulcans, Commerce Club,
Forestry club, Calumet club, Saglnaw
club, Newark club, and Mt. Clemens
club. All members on the committees
of these societies are requested to re-
port at the Union desk today. They
are also asked to leave their names
and the name of the organzation
which they respettivey represent.
President Burton has requested all
members of the faculty to speak of the
campaign in their classes in ordet
that there may be no students who
will not have had the movement call-
ed to their attention,
To Give Benefit Movie
Saturday morning the management
of the Majestic theater is giving a
special performance, all the receipts
of which will go to the fund. The ad-
mission will be 25 cents for adults
and 10 cents for children.
A dance will be given from 2:30 to S
o'clock Saturday afternoon in the
Union assembly hall, the proceeds of
which will also g to the fund. An
admission fee $ 50 cents will be
charged. George E. Rogers, '21E, has
offered the services of his orchestra
for the occasion.
It will simplify the work of the com-
mittee if contributors will make
checks out to "cash."
It is hoped that the students will
realize the seriousness of the sit'.a-
Lion both in China and in Europe
which this campaign is aiming to bet-
ter. Everyone is urged to give as
much as he can and not to limit his
contribution to $3.00.
GIRL GRADUALLY RECOVERING
FROM COMATOSE CONDITION
Iona Poland, 'the 15 year old girl
found lying unconscious on the side.
walk near State and Williams strt_
early Monday morning, is recovering
from the comatose condition in whie
she has been since she was found.
According to Doris Johnson, 1, the
friend with whom Miss Poland spent
Friday' and Saturday nights and Sun-
day evening, there was nothing of
which she was aware of to account
for the condition of her friend.

About 7 o'clock Sunday evening, the
two girls, escorted by two students,
went to a Chinese chop suey place
for dinner, the evening being spent
until about 11 o'clock at Miss John-
son's home, when, the chop suey es-
tablishment was again visited. The
younger girl seemed all right except
that while in the Chinese restaurant
the second time she seemed to be
sleepy.
According to the hospital authori-
ties Miss Poland is gradually recov.
ering consciousness,although as yet
her condition has been such that she
could not be closely examined regard-
ing the events of the last few days

"Just Like The Good Old Army
Days, "Men Say Of Mental Tests

"Just like the good old army days"
was the way most of the men char-
acterized the second lap of the men-
tality test that was held yesterday
afternoon in the Law building. Some
500 students took the examination,
which lasted an hour.
It was divided into parts, one a
test on the ability to read and retain,
and the other on the order of those
given in the army when they were
trying to get the dentists out of the
mule driving outfits.
In the reading test the students
were given folders which contained
the article to be read together with
questions on its content. After hav-

ing three minutes for reading, the
students indicated how much of the
article they had covered. Questions
on the subject matter were then an-
swered on the back of the folder.
The questions in the other part of
the test were of the sort that de-
manded ability to think and to think
quickly. One student remarked that
about the only thing they didn't ask
was, "How long is a piece of string?"
All the work was done within time
limits.
Only 350 of those taking the exam-
ination were probationers, the other
150 having been prompted to find out
just how their brains lined up with
the charts.

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