100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 23, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

mpus

In

State

Of

Comal

i

must solve. It is the vitalquestion of Uri, the advertising columns of The
the hour, and one which will continue Michigan Daily to reach' the best of
to be of paramount interest untila
solution is reached. The very fact
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
that the greater portion of the corn- ue The Michigan Daily.-Adv.
mnnica tinn recePivedin h m . nnnd tn__.

3,'

I
li

OUY ATHLETICS,
JEDS' JUNIOR HOP
lO0USE STUDENTS
(Continued from Page One)
igan used to have in days past.
whole thing is that we are all sit-
back. Listening to the stories of
old days-blaming, everything on
absence of liquor and the presence
e co-ed, and saying Let George
t ,
iother writer carries along the
e point. "What is wrong with
igan athletics?" he asks. "Noth-
save that the student body is
ep, and that as it sleeps it dreams,
e dream phantasies taking the
i of glories that have been. Ah,
: in 1901, 1902, 1903, etc., ad in-
um-until the past few years
n our dreams literally 'got us.'"
e are all somriabulists, according
his writer, wandering aimlessly
it the campus "in a perpetual state
coma." "'What is wrong with
ligan?' we occasignally find the
gy to ask, and then, being utterly
ued by this exertion, we say, 'The

professor doesn't profess,' or some
such utterly inane remark, when in
reality, 90 per cent of the trouble is
with ourselves."
But all of this is rather intangible.
Perfectly true, in its way, no doubt,
and yet difficult to grasp. Passing on
to things which are more readily
grasped, we find from one student
that the campus has lost its faith in
those who are in authority, simply be-
cause they have acted, especially in
the matter of the J-Hop with such
utter disregard to the feelings of the
student body. Arguing that the de-
cision in itself was right, claims this
writer, the method employed was
wrong, and was in itself a display of
great ingratitude to the members of
the present Junior class, which has
done much to better the University.
Questions Hop Action
"It is not for us to question the
decision of members of the faculty,
but it is our privilege to at least very
mildly suggest that in taking away the
one unalterable right of every Univer-
sity in the United. States-that of giv-
ing a large social function once each
year, whether it be Hop, Prom or
Frolic--the authorities have shut their
eyes to a few of the services which
those same students who are charac-
terized and marked by their 'individual
caddishness' have done for their alma
mater.

'The University passed a crisis
In its existence back in the fall of
1918. The very height of the war
fervor had been reached. Members
of the junior and senior classes
were few, and there were many
things which needed the guiding
hands of men older in the ways of
college to bring them safely
through the year. But there were
not the older hands to take up the
work and 'the freshman class of
that year-the present junior class
which may not have its Hop be-
cause of the 'selfish recklessuss'
of some of its members and of the
student body at large-was forced
to take hold of athletics, of pub-
lications, of practically every
branch of the campus activities."
Other accomplishments of the class
of 1922 are enumerated in this com-
munication which claims that the stu-
dent body cannot co-operate with the
faculty because, "if the faculty can-
not trust the student body, the mem-
bers of the student body cannot trust
the faculty to use broad-minded Judg-
ment in, dealing with matters which
very specifically concern them."
One of the Sfew students who was
strong enough in the face of adverse
criticism to urge that the University
was all right, attempts to prove his
point by reference to the Bryan lec-
ture, that we are quite awake, show-

ing that class room discussion and'
much individual student opinion was
raised by this one incident. "Hill
auditorium is packed to the doors
upon the occasion of the Oratorical
association numbers, as well as when
the extra-concert course musicians
appear," he goes on to say.
Should Think Differently
"In this day of, short skirts, wool
socks, and galoshes, why should we
think like the students who inhabited
our campus some 30 years ago, when
teas were for women and dansants
unknownrT At thattime study consti-
tuted work and recreation. Today we,
the student body of Michigan, form
only a small portion of the vast pop-
ulation of the United States which has
through many years of prosperous life
learned to combine successfully recre-
ation with business. The question
which faces a student today is the
regulation of his study, campus activ-
ities, and recreation in a manner
which will produce rewards in each."
But in recognizing that this is the
problem which confronts students
when they enter college and in fact,
throughout all of the four years of
their university life, the writer of this
communication, too, admits that there
is something wrong with Michigan to-
day, for surely students have failed to
discover this happy medium between
work and play, Perhaps here is one
of the greatest defects in the campus
life today. One or the other of these
two evils is too much emphasized.
Whether or not the wrong can be rec-
tified is a problem which the student
body, individually and collectively
ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR

*ltuscaLitJ&rO St.&veu ave po nLeT Lo
some deficiency at Michigan should
serve to make the campus think. And
if it thinks, and continues to think,
then the problem will be sglved.

Michigan Daily liners bring re-
sults.-Adv.
Read The Daily for Campus News.

TODAY'S CHURCH SERVICES

CHUICH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES
South University Ave.
F. P. ARTHUR, PASTOR
Department of Religious Educa-
tion, 9:30 A. M. Maurice Tay-
lor, Superintendent.
10:30 A. M. - Subject, "The
Saviour's Teaching."
7:30 P. M. - A film on the
screen. Sermon and Question
Box. Third of Everybody's
service. All invited.

~~nJreuzr jiztw
Cor. Catherine and Division Sts.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
7:35 A. M. -- Holy Communion.
10:30 A. M. - Morning Prayer
and Sermon by the Rector,
"The Nation and the World."

4:30 P. M. - Evening
and Address by the
"The First Zionists."

Service
Curate,

I

I

AM
---SAM E M,

FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below Statem
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER

321 East Ann Street

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minsiter.
January 23, 1921
10:40 A. 14. -"The Enthusiasm
of Living." The life of Roose-
velt shows the enthusiasm of
living. We ma. be more sure
that he was an enthusiastic
liver than that Jesus was.
Suppose we begin with the
question, What makes the en-
thusiastic life?
5:45 P. M. - Y. P. R. U. Social
Hour.
6:30 P. M. - Forum of Reli-
gion. Miss Bessie Kraska, '20,
of 'Detroit Juvenile, Court,.
speaks: "Detroit's Social
Problems."
YOUNG PEOPLE'S SUNDAY
Young people assist at morn-
ing service.

TODAY, TOMORROW

MATINEE
TODAY: 1:30 - 3:00 - 4:30
THIS EVENING: 7:00 - 8:30

Headquarters in Lane Hall.
Classes meet in the "Upper
Room."
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.

10:30 A. M. - J. M: Wells will'
speak on "The Great Quest."
6:30 P. M. - Guild Meeting.
7:30 P. M. - L. M. Kelly, Ath-
lete, Aviator and Minister,
will speak.

AND TUESDAY

)nly a pot of Flowers - but they
-.made her hlaiicb with Feat!

I

I.

Ask for' printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edifice, 409 S. Division

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

CORNER HURON AND DIVISION

_

Only a whiff of heliotrope - and a mad-
dening unknown danger, closing over her
like a pall of death.
A message from the man whose daughter's
life she plotted to ruin! He'd escaped
from prison-+ Was out to "get" her!
When? How? The rest is one long thrill
and shows how great a father's love can be!

'il

10:30 A. M.

An attempt will be* made to answer the questions: "From
What Does Jesus Christ Actually Save Us?" "How
May We Obtain This Salvation?"

"THE ORIGINAL CHRIST"

12:00 Noon. "Science and The Bible Miracles." Dr. Iden's Student
'Class.
6:00 P. M. Young People's Society. Social half-hour. Dorothy Ar-
baugh leads in "Christian Fundamentals - The Bible."
JAN. 30 7:00 P. M. Dr. Henry Seymour Brown of Chicago will be
the Tappan Lecturer.

'
A . i.,,
.rd4r

Sunday services at 10:30 A.M.
The subject is "Truth." Testimo-
nial meeting, Wednesday even-
ing at 7:30. A cordial invita-
tion is extended to all. Sunday
School at 11:45 A. M., to which
pupils under 20 years may be
admitted. A, public reading
room, 236 Nickels Arcade, is
open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 12 to 5 o'clock.

1'

I

-

ZIO0N LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave.*and Washington St.
REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
120 Packard Street
"Sound believers who are full
of life, and untouched by the
worm of insincerity, hold to
the, .Church .of .God .in .all
. .LrIJLont. UV wnA

I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER, D.D., Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director
Sunday, January 23rd, 1921
10:30 A. M. "The Principle of Probabilities." Pastor's subject.
12:00 Noon. Bible Classes.
6:00 P. M. Social Half Hour.
6:30 P. M. Wesleyan Guild Devotional Meeting. Leader: Mr. Ben-
nett Avery.
7:30 P. M. "The Religion of Stevenson." Pastor's subject.
No better place to spend an hour Sunday evening.
Music for the Day-"Benedictus" (Tour), the Chorus; "Christian, the
Morn Breaks Sweetly O'er Thee" (Shelley), the Chorus; "Hear
Ye, Israel" (from Elijah) (Mendelssohn), "The Lord is my Shep-
herd" (Shelley), the Chorus; "The Crucifix" (Faure)., duet by
Mr. Wheeler and Mr. Thomas.
SPECIAL INVITATION TO ALL STUDENTS

?t

'I.

I

I

i

Famous Players - Lasky
Cprporation...-resenb
"Hlotro

0

C
amount
ldur

Directed by George D. B!aker
A COSMOPOLITAN PRODUCTION
From the Story by Richard Washburn Child

I
San

rsL1e-. Uon Lre a winc-
fall.
10:30 A. M. (German) "Thos
Within Winning Those With-
out."
7:30 P. M. (English) "A Les- j CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
son in Subtraction."
Mr. Douglas will deliver the third sermon-lecture of the
"i"lIl1"1""111""1 1"t" series on "LIFE AS AN INDUSTRY.
TRINITY LUTHERAN _ The topic for the day is:
HR:"TRAINING THE EMPLOYEES."
FifhAendWiThis address will deal with the five senses - their de-
Fifth Ave. and William St...
e divelopment in alertness, efficiency, and coordination - plus
= Rev. Lloyd Merl Wallick,
a few other senses necessary to the successful life; such as
Pastor
-I} ~"the sense of the fitness of things," "the sense of tact," and
"the sense of humor."
- 1:e It is of advantage to come on time.
-10:30 A. M. - RegularService.
11:30 A. M. - Sunday School.
:UI"""111"1l"1i1111ll "I lU111111illll

.- ---- - -~~I

ft-AvAgal.

EMEMBER HUMORESQUE
AND THE GREAT MOTHER LOVE T
HELIOTROPE IS EVEN GREATER!
E THE FAThER GIVE - AND GIVE HIS LIFE
FOR THE LOVE OF HIS DAUGHTER.

ADDED
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
IN-
THE ADVENTURER
THE ARCADE ORCHESTRA
. C. H. Post, Directing

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan