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January 18, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY "U"SDA",

.._,,,_____________________________________________________________ '

f

WENE OMNSDAILY1
GIVES FACTS INVOLVED IN STATE-
MENT ABOUT LIT COLLEGE
STANDARDS,
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
I was glad to see your recent edi-
torial, "Misleading the Public." I
have not seen the article in Detroit
Saturday Night. The facts involved in
my statement were fully presented at
a closed meeting of Acolytes, as fol-
lows: If French standards were ap-
plied to the Literary college, then, of'
a group of 400 students whose records
I examined, 72 per cent would be re-
turned to preparatory schools properly
organized and staffed to provide the
requisite preliminary knowledge; of
this 72 per cent probably 37 per cent
would find it hopeless to return to the
college. A very different affair from
the fantastic allegations!
The problem involved in such a
statement are as plain as the nose on
one's face. American material is not
naturally inferior to French, or any
other. But the American scholastic
organization is wholly different. Hence#
the problems. (1) Seeing we do notI
attain French standards, what are weI
getting in place of them? (2) This
being quite clearly ascertained, is our
plan preferable to their plan?
It is much to- be desired that Ameri-
cans should read, mark, learn, and in-
wordly digest such articles as those re-
cently contributed by Prof. A. G. Web-
ster to The Scientific Monthly, and by
Walt Mason to Hearst's Magazine. For,
till we look our present situation full
in the face, we shall continue to drift.
R. M. WENLEY,
Professor of Philosophy.
NEW YORK ALUMNI LAY PLANS
FOR ANNUAL MARCH BANQUET

1 T -- ------ .+ _ _ _ E

ANDREW GREEN OFFERS PRIZES
TO UNION STUDENT EMPLOYEES
Andrew H. Green, Jr., vice-president
and general manager of the Solvay
Process Co. of Detroit has given $150
to be distributed to student employees
at the. Union for most efficient service.
Homer Heath, general manager of the
Union, explained the details of the con-
test Saturday afternoon.-
Five prizes are to be given in
amounts of $50, $40, $30, $20, and $10
respectively, to the employees com-
plying best with the requirements of
the contest. Punctuality and neatness
in appearance will be some of the re-
'quirements.
SWAIN LECTURES TONIGHT ON
TRIP TO ISLAND OF PATMOS
Mr. G. R. Swain of the Latin depart-
ment will lecture at 8 o'clock tonight
ii Natural Science auditorium on the
subject, "Four Week on the Island of
Patmos," under the auspices of the
Scroll.
Mr. Swain was a member of the ex-
pedition from the University that vis-
ited the "island last May, the first
group of visitors for eight years. The
chief point of interest on this island
is the Monastery of St. John, founded
in 1088 in honor of the Apostle, who is'
said to have written the Book of the
Apocalypse on this spot.

ARTI

HUR FORMS
INFANTRY UNIT

"Affairs of the R. 0. T. C. have pro-
gressed to a stage where the organ-
ization of an additional unit here in
the University seems advisable," stated
Major Robert Arthur of the R. 0. T.
C.," yesterday. A number of students
have indicated their desire for an in-
fantry unit and Major Arthur has de-
cided to attempt such an organization.
The formation of an infantry unit
is contingent upon the enrollment of
100 students in that unit. Some of the

students are now in the R. 0. T. C. but
additional enrollments are required.
Major Arthur is enrolling students
with the understanding that, should
the number be insufficient, or the unit
fail to be authorized, the enrolled stu-
dent may then obtain his discharge or
be transferred to another unit as he
desires.
The work will start'with the seond
semester andI enrollment can be made
now. A student should enroll through
the military science department in
room 239 Engineering building, and
should elect military science in usual
manner.

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PRE-INVENTORY -
w :SALE
25 Per Cent Discount
ON CRANE'S LINEN LAWN & HIGHLAND LINEN
STATIONERY AND CORRESPONDENCE CARDS
The Mayer-Sehairer o.I
w ESTATIONERS, PRINTERS & BINDERS
112 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 1404
- Iti11l i lil llllll 1 f 1 1 f 1 1 i t 1i l tl i

I

New York alumni of the University
are making extensive preparations for
their annual banquet to be held March
10 in that city. President Marion L.
Burton will deliver an address at the
banquet. President Emeritus Harry
B. Hutchins and the deans of the vari-
ous departments have been invited to
attend.
At last year's banquet both Presi-
dent Hutchins and Dr. Burton, then
president-elect, were in attendance.
On March 11, President Burton will
attend a gathering of the Boston
alumni. Regent Junius E. Beal also
plans to attend the Boston meeting.

Extemp oraneu
SpeechContest,
SAAASELANGELL.HAL
TONIGHT 8 O'CLOCK
SNo Admission Chargedel.,U

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1 "YANKS ENTER CHINA"
One family of three were migrating from their dis- "
tressed home to some better place. On the way they were = F O R 1LiN 'iI FA M IN E .=Head-Line from Chicago Tribune Nov. 18, 1920.
out of food. The parents had to leave their child on the = Cabinet ministers and other authorities ncluding
way, but the lttle one who was about two years old was r American and British missionaries and business men are
trying to come after them and crying. The parents came discussing the farmers' lives in North China calmly. The
back to the child and tied it to a piece of stone, and went decision reached means that from 20,000,000 to 30,000,000
on their way. But the child cried the bitter that drew persons must die, for it is possible to save lives only by
back the broken-hearted parents again: They left all the = sending food to districts which could be given continuous
money they had, not much more than twenty cents, to the c supply.
child in the hope of that when some generous person f IfI d Itoriu m J an u ry 2"We can barely scratch the surface," said American
would come by the child and pity it by buying some eata- - i- Miniser Crane. "It may be possible to save 5% of the
ble for it in the use of the money they left.-(Young 30,000,000 if relief comes quickly and cen be transported
China.) =y to the interior swiftly. Perhaps only 1% will be saved,
and to save even that small percentage quick action must
THE FAMINE SITUATION IN NORTH CHINAR2 THE PROCEEDS from this show = be taken. The people at home must furnsh grain and
(Millard Review, September 2=, 1920. Page 163)Fclothing or the money to buy them. Grain would be pre-
"Persons of property," asserted Mr. John Earl Baker, ferable for food costs more here. You must remember
chairman of the Peking Chapter of the American Red that in the famine districts covering that part of Shan-
Cross, "have been attempting to purchase grain for per- will e sent to the Chinese sufferers inU tung north of the Yellow River, a small part of Honan
sonal or village use, but they have met with embargoes on the fringe of Shantung, and all that part of Chili lying
in unfortunate localities and lack of railway transporta- south of an east and west line drawn through Paoting
tions on account of unlimited requisitions. Entire vil 2=the name of former President A ngell, there is not an ounce of food. The section near the Pe-
lages have endeavored to migrate to the regions of bet- king Hankow railway is the most critical.
ter crops but they have been driven back by the armed d"'
guards. Many train loads of famine refugees sent to = =h s ra o k in C ia rc ie "The crops were destroyed about two years ago, last
Manchuria have also turned back and are now facing slows great C year grasshoppers covered the ground, devouring the veg-
starvation in Tientsin. Famine sufferers are committing -witation, and this year the rain failed.
suicide on a wholesale scale by poisoning their last mor- -="It is the duty of America to civilization to save as
sels with arsenic. world-wide attention. many lives as possible," urged Mr. Crane.
(Millard Review October 23, 1920. Page 389)
A region roughly 300 miles north of the Yellow River U.
and 100 miles south of it, and extending from close to the "STARTNG CHINESE MILLING CHILDRE"
East Coast westward, no one knows how far, is without . '
food for man or beast and without seed for next year's This is no request for Donations. Detroit News, November 21, 1920.
planting. Approximately 45,000,000 are known to be af- "America might far better send to China the relief
fected. Twenty-five million are in dire straits, and a pop- that is now being sent to Central Europe, for where one
ulation greater than that of Belgium will perish in the The show will be one of the best you will starve in Europe one hundred ill starve in China,"
next six weeks, if relief measures of Veroic proportions = said A. L. Moore, of Detroit on his returnthis week from
are not forthcoming before the cold weather sets in. - a trip to the Orient.
"We are deeply appreciative for the aid coing from will see this year, receiving support "From 25,000,000 to 45,000,000 Chinese ar ,taAig
"We re eepy apreiatve or he aidcomng r-mafter having subsisted during the summer on ttles
the Americans in Manila for China in her deep distress," gn h g.The s eront e
U. grass and other vegetation. Two dry seasons'
said Dr. Chow Tse Chi, minister of Finance, "There is wet have left the Chinese three crop failures. Con
suffering in Shan Tung, but you are right in sending the U.m the aulty, st d n s n ii - are critical. Only prompt aids from America and
first shipment to Chili for there the famine is the worst, can save these people. The assistancegrTrntueyor
since it covers a larger area. We hope that your country countries Is insuficient.
will realize our need and with your famous promptitude w zens of Ann Arbor
and generosity, aid our suffering.:' "Whole families have abandoned ther arm and go*M
nryd r r to the thicily populated centers in search of food. Par
lands, their stocks, their clothing and have knocked down U.outs are selling the children or riving them ray n
their houses to sell the wood. They have flung whole
families into the river, and the worst is to come as win-
ter draws closer." Tickets 50c - NOW ON SALEEE A SHOW
SEE A GOOD SHOW 2
EO SAND LET YOUR MONEY SAVE LIVES
AND LET YOUR MONEY SAVE' LIVES = State Street Stores - Campus = Lanie HallAN LEYORM EYSELIE

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