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January 13, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer
ity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Assodi Led 1ress is ixxclusiveiy entitled to the use for
republication of news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
redited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
less matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications'not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig--
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer ineloses postage.
The Daily does notnecessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going an" notices will not be received after -8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
BP.Campbell J. E. McManis
. I. apbell T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
unday Editor...............-....J. A. Bernstein
[ditorials.............. Lee XWoodruff,.,L. A. Kern, T. J3 Whinery
assistant Nev% .. ... . . ..... .."......E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sorts....................... ..Robert Angell
omen's Editor................. ..........Mary D. Lane
Telegraph......................... .........West Gallogly
relescppe .................. .............,... .Jack W. Kelly

sephine Waldo,
Lii G. Weber
izabeth Vickery
It. Clark
!orge Reindel
rothy Monfort
arry B. Grundy
ances Oberholtzer
bert . Adams
Byronk Darnton

Assistants
Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace F. Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
3. A.'Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
J. W. 1-me, Jr.
H. 1,. Howlett

M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Haslet'
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Wailer

MAKING VICTORY IMPOSSIBLE
The beginning of this year's basketball season has
been on the whole rather disappointing to us, but
we cannot fairly blame the team alone for the in-
auspicious opening. The Wisconsin game was lost
largely through a bit of "hard luck", and the loss
of the game with Indiana Monday night cannot be
ascribed nearly as much to the players themselves
as to the crowd in attendance.
There are certain members of this year's basket-
ball five who, although they played an excellent
game and showed a great deal of ability during the
Southern trip and in the first Conference game,
seem to have fallen into disfavor with'the stu-
dents and are accordingly subject to considerable
"razzing"' when on the floor. The spirit Monday
in this regard was certainly deplorable and un-
worthy of a Michigan audience. No man, no mat-
ter how goud a Mlayer, can keep up his nerve and
fight when ie hears from all sides comments det-
rimental to him and knows thar the people in the
stands are not behind him as they should be.
What we like to call "Michigan spirit" does not
countenance anything but wholehearted support of
the team from start to finish. No crowd that is
worthy of the name of Michigan has ary business
lying down on its job of support at any time from
the blowing of the first whistle to the firing of the
last gun, and those who fail to boost when the
score is going against their team or take out their
disappointment on certain players have no right to
be at the game..
BOXING CLASSES
Boxing, as a sport, has only recently come into
an active place in the list of Michigan athletics and,
with the organization of the Boxing club this year,
bids fair to remain and grow in importance. It is
a sport which not only develops muscle in all parts
of the body and has a toughening physical influ-
ence, but which also gives agility and self-control.
Classes in the sport are now being instructed by
Coach Ted Sullivan. For a reasonable fee any man
may obtain four lessons, and the course, though al-
ready under way, is still open to entrants.
The college pranks made so much of by the news-
papers in a near-by metropolis have nothing on the
frolics of the officials of Detroit when they decide
it is necessary to maroon an assistant D. U. R.
manager by getting him over on Belle Isle and then
lifting the drawbridge.
And the Lit shall sit down with the Engineer,
saith the good book - the time, tonight ; the occa-
sion, Michigan's first Senior Lit-Engineer smoker;
the speakers, a president and two deans; the music,
melodious; the success and spirit of the occasion,
up to you, Mr. '21 and Mr. '21E. All out!
Mr. Harding has decided not to have an. elab-
orate inaugural blow-out, a decision which inclines
one to wonder, then, how much of a convoy he
will want when he takes his first fishing trip on the
presidential yacht.
Communications which express opinions are good-
thins, but znonymous letters, such as are occa-
sionally received by The Daily, are a pest. Let's
stand behind our ideas.

DETROIT UNITED LINES.
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.mn
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
G AkM'S
Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

I

JANUARY
S M T' W T

YOUR CAR'S WAITING,
MADAX
We always have a clean,
smart looking car, to take
3'ou where' you want to go,
at reasonable rates. Our
machines provide the com- -
fort and appearance of a per-
sonally-owned car, without
the expense and worry that
goes with privately maintain-
ed equipment. Rates by the
hour, day, or week.
CITY TAXI
PHONE 320

I

F S
1

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
SINESS MANAGER ...-.....LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
ertising ................................. D. P. Joyce
sifieds............. ......................Robt. 0. Kerr
lication...................-. ..-... M. Heath
ounts ........ .... - -.. ....E. R. Priehs
-lation............ .......V. F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
mund Kunstadter Robt L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
ter W. Millard M. M. Moue D. G. Slawson
fHamel Jr. D. S. Watterwortb R. G. Burchel

2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 -18 19 20 21k 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

CALL CRANE 625 F-1
_______for
Anthracite - All Kinds
Pocahiontas and Solviy Coke
Ohio & Kentncky Egg & Lump
PRICES RIGHT

SeP Anylace ut
Lat at Rex's
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard

I

For

es#
?.

, iwacuca ..,

_. _.

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that nighit.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1921.
Night Editor-B. P. CAMPBELL.
The Cubs' club wil meet at 4 o'clock this after-
no o.
ON THE SHOALS OF THINKING
American university studenjs are frequently ac-
cused of superficiality. Educators charge them
with insincerity because of their obvious lack of
deep, conscimntious study.
Many of us will not deny that we are leading
purposeless lives, largely because we have found
no one great purpose to which we have an overpow-
ering desire to devote ourselves. We have come
to this university chiefly because it is the thing to
do and not so that we may be better prepared to
serve manl:ind. While w are here, we strive to
find our niche i life.
In hunting for it we take a bit of economics, a
few courses }in sociology, and some rhetoric, inter-
spersed here and'there with a heterogenous group
of odds and ends in literature, 1hilosophy, science
or the arts. When we have finished our work we
have a hazy idea of this and that and the other
thing, without being any too sure of any of them.
The foregoing of course applies chiefly to those of
us who are students of the "Lit" School.
The students in the professional schools and col-
leges have a more thorough groundwork in the
principles of their subjects. They know definite
the results to be obtained by following out to its
conclusion some definite mode of action. This de-
sirable end has not been attained because the stu-
dents of one school are inherently more capable
than those of another, but rather it is because they
have settled upon their aim in life before coming
to the University, and are now doing their utmos
to attain, it. Instead of juming from course to
course they follow the prescribed curriculum with-
out deviation
Whether or not the student is to blame for not
having found himself remains an open question
Modern society itself has no hard and fast stand-
ards of the approved and the disapproved. Wher
one is' young and there is an unlimited choice of
possibilities it is hard to decide upon the best. S
long as we remain unsettled in our lifework, w
are bound to be httrac'ted b the iiperfcial rather
than the deep. That most of us can and do put
hard, consistent work when we know what we ar
after has been proved by the general ittitude of
students in the professional schools.
Granted that this superficiality does exist, the
way to remedy it liessopen to every student. TV
only trouble is that we are not awake to the fact
our shallowres and lack of purpose; once we know
ourselves and take as a remedy a food dose of self-
disarist. determinition. arid OnnT-mindMnes. we
will not only be better men and women, but w
he sure to find our niche in life the sooner. Broader
radinr and brrldr ways of tinkinr are the one
P.reat need at Michigan. We must replace the ol
distaste for all real brainwork by a venuine respect
for the mAn who knows what is woing on in the
world and has onnions based nn fact We mu
et off the shoals of thinking.

MISS MOSES
Private Dancing Lessons
BY APPOINTMENT
Phone 1545 W
Poultry and Pet Stock Show on So.
Fourth Avenue continues through this
week. Poultry school conducted by
A. C. Freeman, Thursday and Friday,
afternoons and evenings.-Adv.
Patronize Daily advertisers.-Ad-
SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLAN
BEST LINE IN THlE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

I

STUDY LAMPS

ELECTRIC' SUPPLIES

and all kinds of

I

go to

W ASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

PHONE 273

200 WASHINGTON ST.

THE BANK OF SERVI CE

x,

Commercial Banking in all its Branches.
Savings Department and Safety Deposit Vaults.
Exchange on All Parts of the World.
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks.

"Study in Europe Hard" reads Daily head.
sonally we have not found study in America
different.

I

FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK

Per-
much

Students Lunch

101-103 So. Main St.

330 So. State St., (Nickels Arcade)

Member of the Federal Reserve System.

Why not equip the clamorous Library radiators
with calliopes?
~ The Telescope
Instructor-Can any one in the class tell me
what is the burning question of the hour?
Stude-Certainly, "Has the bell rung yet?"
Dear Noah:
Why is it that room C of the economics depart-
ment building is often heated up like an oven?
I. Wuhnder.
I don't know, unless it is because several of the
instructors make their daily bread in that room.
Statistics gthered recently by is show the fol-
lowing interesting facts about every 1,ooo students
who read this column daily:
No. of those who know that they could write
a better column themselves........... 989
No. of those who read it through and then
exclaim, "How does he get that way
anyway ?". .........................X998
No. of those actually taking enough interest
to send in an occasional contribution.. 4
You are probably ight, Clarice, when you say
that an optimist is a person who can have a good
time thinking what a good time he.would have if
he were having it.
First stude (sentimentally)-And did .you ever
stop to consider that many of the girls you pass
on the campus are illuminating the night of some
lucky student's life.
Second ditto-You're probably right. I notice a
lot of them are moon faced.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, breaking the news," he muttered as the
second assistant dropped the galley of type.
NOAH COUNT.

409 Jefferson

I

ALL OUR

High Class Food
Open 6 a.m. Close 11 p.m
.9iss Kruzska's
Dancing Studio

Ulster

Overcoats,

II

Reduced
50 to6o%

Opens Monday

FROM

Students wishing instruc-
tion in Fancy Dancing, or
Ball room Dancing may
call at Studio -
324 L. Huron Street
or 2308-R
1
LEAVERS
PRESSERS.
90 n62.ro
Ladies Pary Gowns a Specially

November 4st Prices

$125 to $140 Crombie Coats
£ $69.00
$100 to $110 Irish Conner
Coats--$52.50

$85 to $95 Ulsters

$45.00

These prices are approximately 40 per cent below
manufacturer's cost

336 South State Street

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