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January 13, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-13

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THE WEATHER
SLIGHTLY RISING TEM-
PERATURE TODAY

r~fr ian

titx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SE RICE

I

[.

VOL XXXI. No. 73. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1921 PRICEIVE CENTS

NE[ CITY CHARTER
TO BE PRESENTED
AT NEXTELECTION
EXISTING INSTRUaIENT WILL RE-
GULATE ELECTION OF NEW
OFFICIALS
IF ADOPTED, CHARTER
BECOMES ACTIVE IN MAY.

I - I

DISCONTINUATION OF
J-HOP ANNOUNCED
The discontinuation of the
Junior Hop was announced yes-
terday by Prof. Louis A. Strauss,
chairman of the Committee on
Student Affairs. This decision
was reached by a unanimous
vote of the committee. No reas-
ons have been made public for
the action, but Professor Strauss
promised a statement in the near
future.

i

Educational Oppportunities For
Ex-Service Men Aim Of Will

for

I

Necessary Officers Are Provided
In Event That Either System
is Adopted

Details have been worked out in
regard to the proposed city charter
drawn up by a commission of which
Prof. E. C. Goddard is chairman, so
that,. if adopted, its powers will not
radically conflict with the results of
the city election next April 14. At this
time the proposed charter will be
voted upon but the election of city
officials will take place under the reg-
ulations of the charter now in effect.
At the election April 14 there will
be selected a mayor, president ofthe
common council, one alderman from
each ward, a justice of the peace, su-
pervisor, and constables. As explain-
ed by Professor Goddard yesterday, if
the proposed charter should not be
adopted by' a majority vote, those bf-
ficials elected would take and hold
office as though there had been no
charter election. ,
Terms Expire in May
To avoid calling a special election
and to provide officers ready to oper-
ate under the, new charter, if it is
adopted, the commission has provid-
ed that in such a case the terms of
office of those men elected under the
old charter shall expire the first
Monday in May, 1921, except that of
justice of the peace, which shall ob-
tain until July 4.
On the first Monday in May the new
charter, if adopted, shall take effect,
and in that case the mayor shall be
mayor under the new charter, the
president of the council shall be a
councilman at large, and the aldermen
elected under the old government
shall be councilmen from the wards
under the new charter. The election
of justice of the peace will be ratified,
also.
Elect Two New Councilmen
It is pointed ou: that this cares for
all the officers to be elected under the
new charter except two councilmen
from the city at large. It is provid-
ed that in addition to the officers re-
quired under the present charter, two
councilmen at large shall be nominat-
ed and voted for.
The plan adopted by the commis-
sion insures the election of the nec-
essary officers to carry on the gov-
ernment under either charter. As the
new charter divides the present sev-
enth ward into two wards, the new
seventh and eighth, there will be two
aldermen elected from the present
seventh ward, one from each pre-
cinct, who will be councilmen from
the new seventh and eighth wards..
EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEECH 1
CONTEST FINALS ON TUESDAY
All plans have been completed for1
the extemporaneous speech contestl
which will take place at 8 o'clock nextt
Tuesday in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
The preliminaries will take place. at
2 o'clock Saturday, the contestants toc
choose subjects from the list to be1
posted at 10 o'clock Saturday morn-.
ing in 304 Mason hall, or they mayl
develop a subject of their own choos-
ing. The length of the speeches will
be eight minutes. Twenty-five judges
will be selected from among advanc-1
ed public speaking students and mem-l
belt of Delta S!gma Rho. DefiniteP
subjects will be announced for the
final two hours in advance. he firstl
and second prizes will be a silverr
loving cup and n. book.c

HIDIN AGIN UPSETS
INAUGURATION PLANS
DOES NOT WANT CEREMONY TJ
TAKE PLACE IN SENATE
CHAMBER
(By Associated Press)
Marion, Jan. 12.-Upsetting for the
second timpe plans for his inaugura-
tion, President-elect Harding suggest-
ed to officials in charge of the ar-
rangements in Washington today that
they had gone further than necessary
for simplicity in deciding to hold the
ceremony in the senate chamber.
Would Observe Usual Custom
Observance of the usual custom of
taking the oath on the east portico of
the Capitol building,, Mr. Harding tele-
graphed to Washington, would be quite
agreeable to him and would permit a
much greater number of spectators to
be present. If no money was spent in
the erection of special stands, he said,
there could be no objection from the
viewpoint of econom'y.
The congressional committee's de-
cision to hold the ceremony in the
Capitol building had resulted in num-
erous protests from persons who had
arranged to go to Washington for the
inauguration.
On the other hand many telegrams
commending the decision for a curtail-
ment of the usual inauguration pomp
were made public at the Harding
headquarters and the President-elect
expressed his opinion that his course
had the approval of the people gen-
erally.
Will Go to Florida
Mr. Harding in addition to shaping
details for his inauguration is con-
tinuing the work of the cabinet pro-
blem and completing plans for a va-
cation trip to Florida. The likelihood
is that virtually all of the decisions
of cabinet appointments will be made
from Florida and there were indica-
tions that Mr. Harding might leave
Marion without making a choice for
any of the 10 portfolios.
SENIOR CLASSES JOIN
IN MEET TONIGHT
Members of the senior literary and
engineering classes have one of the
best opportunities of the year to hear
President Marion L. Burton at the
smoker of the combined classes to be
held at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the
Union. This is the only time this year
that President Burton has spoken be-
fore such a gathering, and it gives
the seniors a chance to establish pre-
cedent in the matter of attendance.
President Burton himself is anxious
that a good crowd attend, as this is his
best opportunity to talk to the sen-
iors apart from the rest of the school.
Entertainment Planned'
Entertainment of a high grade is
promised by George Rogers, who will
have his orchestra present, Knight
Mirrielees, '21E, and George Roderick,
'21E. These men have been secured
by the members of the musical com-
mittee, and are always attractions in
campus affairs. Smokes and eats are
also promised by those in charge of
the program.
Tags on Sale
Engineers and lits will hear dis-
cussed the problems with which each
is confronted, and this smoker, partic-
ularly ~with Dean John R. Effinger

dealing with the lit school, and Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley with the engin-
eers, should go a long way toward
creating a more friendly feeling be-
tween the members of the two depart-

As a result of a three months drive
on the part of service men a tenta-
tive bill has been drawn up by facul-
ty experts of the University law
school which provides for free tuition
and a book allowance of $50 at any
institution of learning in the state,
which has the approval of the super-
intendent of public instruction, to
those male members of the state of
Michigan who have served for six
months or more in any branch of the
service. Copies of the bill have been'
sent to influential senators and rep-
resentatives.
At the invitation of Senator Duncan
McRae, chairman of the senate con-
mittee on military affairs, Warren Gil-
bert, '22E, commander, and Hamilton
Cochran, '22, quartermaster of the
Richard N. Hall post of the Veterans
of Foreign Wars, made a trip to
Lansing to confer with the senator
and his committee regarding the pro-
posed measure. Senator McRae stat-
ed that the bill was very practical.
"This is the most reasonable measure
presented thus far relating to the mat-
ter of aid for ex-service men, in so'
much as the state willcbenefit by in-
creased efficiency through education,"
declared the senator in the course of
the discussion.

After the conference with the sena-
torial committee Gov. Alex M. Groes-
beck was interviewed by the represen-
tatives of the University post of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars. The gov-
ernor said, "I am very much interest-
ed in this bill, as it outlines the pol-
icy brought out in my inauguration
speech relative to an extension of ed-
ucation in the state. I will take this
matter up with the committee in t'
near future."
Members of the Michigan Manufac-
turers' association have come out
strongly in favor of this measure as
it will mean that former service men
in their employ will be enabled to
make themselves more valuable by at-
tending night schools and technical
schools. An opportunity will also be
given if the legislation passes for
farmer boys of the state to attend a
special winter session at M. A. C.
It has been estimated that at least
500 men at the University will be
eligible to free tuition and a book al-
lowance under this bill. Thousands
throughout the state will be effected
by the passage of such a proposition
as fsumanifested by the fact that the
measure has the hearty endorsemen
of more than 10,000 service men, repy
resented in the state department of
the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

-3
-1

UNUSUAL DISPLAY IN
ENGINEERING LIBRARY
Four large stained glass win-
dows, designed and executed by
Nicola D'Ascenzo for the Wash-
ington Memorial chapel at Val-
ley Forge Park, Pa., are being
exhibited in the engineering lib-
rary of the Unhiersity. These
windows are said by artists to
be among the finest of their kind
in the country. Similar windows
are to be found in Chartres Cath-
edral, in France.

SECOND DAY SEES
HALF WAY MARK
NEARED BY S.CiA.
INDIVIDUAL HONORS FOR CAM-
PAIGN HELD BY E. E KIN-
CAID, '22L, TOTAL $77
REPORTS SHOW $2,120
SUBSCRIBED TO DATE
Oswald Micheliann, '22, ,Captains
Leading Team with Total
Subscription of $193

x
BISHOP MCDDMELL
TO SPEAKSUNDAY
Well Known to Eastern University
Audiences, Addressing
Them Often
COMES AS ONE OF MONTHLY UNI-
VERSITY SERVICES SPEAKERS
Bishop William F. McDowell of
Washington, D. C., will speak at the
monthly University service to be held
Sunday pight in Hill auditorium, it
was announced yesterday by the Stu-
dent Christian association committee.
His subject will be announced later.
"Biship McDowell is one of the
most brilliant and popular speakers
on the American platforA," said Thom-
as S. Evans, secretary of the S. C.
A., yesterday. "He not only has an
enviable reputation throughout the
country as a speaker but also as a
writer and prominent churchman.
"In spite of his churh duties as a
bishop in the Methodist Episcopal
church, Reverend McDowell addresses
audiences of. Eastern college students
frequently. At Harvard, Yale, Prince-
ton, Cornell and elsewhere he is pop-
ular, and he will on his trip to the
Middle West include several similar
institutions. He comes to Ann Arbor
Sunday after having spoken at the
University of Chicago in the after-
noon. His message is sure to be a
vital one to Michigan men and
women."
He has held many positions of high
honor including national offices in the
Methodist church, lecturing professor-
ships in several universities, and has
held places on international commit-
tees of the Y. M. C. A. and religiou
commissions.
CHINESE PLAN NEW
SPOTLIGHT ACTS
Acts staged in the fascinating at-
mosphere of the Orient, weird music,
and plaintive Chinese songs will be
featured in the Chinese Spotlight,
Thursday, Jan. 20, in Hill auditorium.'
The Spotlight is to be staged under
the auspices of the Chinese Students'
club of the University and is under
the immediate charge of T. G. Ni,
grad., C. K. Chow, C. Y. Liu, '22E, and
F C Liu, '21L The committee has di-
vided the program into two parts. The
first part is to consist wholly of acts,
by the Chinese students, and the sec-
ond part will be made up of acts by
American students. The proceeds will
be given for the relief of the sufferers
in the famine stricken part of China.
Library Exhibit Closes Tomorrow
Tomorrow is the last day the ex-
hibit in the main corridor of the Lib-
rary on the "Pilgrim Tercentenary"
will be shown.

DEALES SEE No
MORE PRICECUTS
- .I
Maintain That It Is Impossible to Buy
New Stock at Present Retail
Price
NO INCREASE IN BUSINESS
BECAUSE OF REDUCTIONS
That retail prices will not drop any
lower in the near future, because of
the failure of manufacturers to meet
the situation with reductions propor-
tionally as great as those of the re-
tailer is the unanimous opinion of
State street merchants.
Drugs and toilet articles are no
cheaper than they were a year ago
and, while sugar has seen a reduc-
tion from 30 to 11 cents a pound in
the past year, candies remain at the
old prices. Clothing merchants find
that they cannot purchase new stock
at the same price or at any lower
price than they are retailing for at
present. "The consumer should use
caution in making purchases and be
sure that he does not merely pur-
chase the price tag, for no merchant
can or will sell a $100 overcoat for
$50," said one clothing merchant in
discussing the situation. The prices
of books and stationery are advancing
slightly, this is due, according to one
merchant, to the fact that books were
the last of all commodities to ad-
vance. The ban on printing during
the war was responsible for this ten-
dency toward a slow advance in pric-
es. The price of paper is slightly
lower, but publishers do not expect
any reduction in the price of books
at present.
Shoe dealers say they are forced
in many cases to sell certain lines of
shoes at prices which are actually
less than they can buy them for from
the manufacturer.
In spite of the apparently great re-
ductions of the past few months the
dealers declare their volume of busi-
ness has not increased, but that the
public seems to be waiting for the
impossible, a collapse of the market.
This will not take place, however,
without a parallel drop in wages and
the prices of manufactured goods.
Forestry Club to Give Skating Party
Members of the Forestry club at a
meeting last night in the Natural Sci-
ence building decided to have a skat-
ing party at the forestry farm, Satur-
day night of this week.
H. M. Kerber, grad., addressed the
club on "City Forestry," stressing the
importance of tree surgery. C. B.
Webster, '20, also addr.essed the club.
Prof. Frayer Lectures in Niles
"America's Heritage in Europe,"
was the subject of a lecture given by
Prof. William A. Prayer, of the his-
tory department, last night before the
College club of Niles, Mich.

POLITICAL CARER Of
is H1 LEWIS UNUSUAL
ORATORICAL ASSOCIAT'N SPEAK-
ER SENATOR FOR SIX
YEARS
James Hamilton Lewis, who will
deliver the sixth of the series of lec-
tures given under the auspices of the
Oratorical association at 8 o'clock
Friday in Hill auditorium on the sub-
ject, "Our Foreign Relations - Yes-
terday and Tomorrow," has had an
unusual political career.
Ex-Senator Lewis was a candidate
for vice-president of the United States
from the state of Washington before
he had held a public office of any
kind. Previous to this time, how-
ever, he had declined the nomination
for congress, had been a candidate
for governor of the state, and had ob-
tained the nomination to the senator-
ship. A few years after his campaign
for the vice-presidency he was elect-
ed to the Fifty-fifth congress.
The former senator then removed
his residence to the state of Illinois,
where he became immediately prom-
inent in political circles. He was
again nominated for governor and
shortly afterwards was elected to the
United States senate, where he served
for a period of six years.
. f.
Americans Aiding
Austrian Faculty
New York, Jan. 12. - Need of the
faculty members of European univer-
sities is, characterized as just as dis-
tressing as the conditions under which
the students in the same universities
are working by an American profes-
sor who has just written from Vienna
to the American relief administration
describing the situation in that city.
Through the American relief com-
mission, a daily luncheon is served at
eight crowns per head to professors
of the University of Vienna. The lunch-
eon would cost more than 100 crowns
on the outside. The luncheons are
tactfully arranged so as not to give
the impression of charity, and the,
gatherings have the general appear-
ance of faculty club meetings else-
where. Several professors were seen
by an observer to wrap up the bread,
made of American flour, to take home
to their children.
PUPPET "RIP VAN
WINKLE" PLEASES'
"Rip Van Winkle," played by Tony
Sarg's puppets yesterday afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, was
greeted with as much applause and
laughter as many plays with profes-
sional actors. Children seemed par-
ticularly pleased with the tiny mar-
ionettes.
Scenes of the six acts were artfully
laid on the miniature stage. Four of.
the scenes' were interiors perfect~ to
the smallest detail, while the, other
acts took place on the heights of a
mountain, one in summer and the
other in winter. These appeared more
natural on account of the birds flying
about and a small rabbit which per-
formed before it was caught by Rip's.
dog.
"Olla Podrida," which played to a
crowded house last night, will be re-
membered especially for the dancing

marionettes.
J-Law Class Meeting This Afternoon
Junior laws will hold a class meet-
ing at 1:30 o'clock this afteripon in'
room D of the Law building.

Nearing the half-way mark in the
Student Christian 'association drive
for $5,000, the total at the end of
last night's work was $2,120, with
about half of the possible contributors
visited, with the etception of several
fraternities which are to give as a
house, officials of the drive confident-
ly state that the aim of the drive will
be reached before Friday night.
The team oftOswald Michelmann,
'22, led% all others by a big margin.
The total was $193. Second plae war
taken by the team of E. E. Wieman,
'21, with a total of $144 to its credit,
and third place was taken by the team
of Gale Wessinger, '21E, having col-
lected $132.
Many Contribute
High man for the first two days is
Earle E. Kincaid, '22L, with $77 to
his credit. Second place was taken
by Christian D. Christiansen, with
$55, third by H. A. Weitzman, '24E,
with $54; fourth by Frederick E. Gil-
ner, '24, with $51; and fifth by L. F.
Meilander, '22E, with $50.50.
Average contributions from individ-
uals for the first two days were still
high, being $2.06 per contributor. A
high percentage of men visited are
reported as having made contributions
and showing active interest in the
work of, the S. C. A., also.
First Reports Low
Reports given out Tuesday night for
publication were later shown to be
less than half of the first day's total.
Reported as $400, the amounts re-
ported later that night and early
Wednesday added up to $1,020, more
than $600 more than was first stated.
Late reports tonight are expected to
raise the total of yesterday's campaign
at least $500.
Many fraternities and house clubs
heard the details of the S. C. A. work
and the campaign yesterday at lunch
and dinner from canvassers, and the
subscriptions from the majority of
these will not be available until today
so it is expected the total amount al-
ready raised exceeds the announced
sum for a large amount.
Averages High
Average contributions from the var
ious houses so far reported, run high
One house gave $77 and the average of
all was about $50. Committeemen say
the interest among the houses visited
so far is high and that the contribu-
tions per man are averaging high.
Rivalry between teams and individ-
uals is running high, with the steak
dinner for the winning team and three
high men as the prize. Another incen-
tive to team competition came in today
when the Ann Arbor Rotary club,
through its president, Shirley W.
Smith, secretary of the University, ex-
tended an invitation to the drive of-
ficials and the captains of the three
highest teams, to attend its weekly
dinner at the Union next Wednesday.
UNIVERSITY LEGION POST
FAVORS ALLOWANCE BILL
Members of the University post No.
303 American Legion went on record
last night as supporting the educa-
tional allowance bill, now pending in
the legislature at Lansing.
Warren W. Gilbert, '22E, post com-
mander of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars, who returned yesterday from
Lansing, said: "Sentiment in Lansing
strongly favors the state educational
allowance bill as advocated by the
local post of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars. A great help will be rendered
if all ex-service men and others in-
terested in the passage of the bill
will write their representative in the
legislature urging speedy enactment."
Meetings of the legion will take
place the second Wednesday of each
month. Those joining at the next

neeting on Feb. 9 will have the priv-
ilege of becoming charter memebrs of
the organization.

NOTICE! ALL SENIORS
Due to labor conditions affect-
0 ing our engravers and printers
the final date for taking of Sen-
ior pictures for the Michigan-
ensian IS JANUARY 22. Ar-
range for sittings immediately.
Saturday, January 22 is the final
date. Don't wait until the last
'few days.

ments.
Admission tags are on sale on the
campus, and at the door.

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