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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 12, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIC

DAILY

W'ED i: '.,:? J .:'UARX

-.-

a

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at, te postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business 960; Editorial, ^14.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion oi the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript wig be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does pot necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pi essed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will riot be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor ..........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.-
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor..... .........-..... .J......J. A. Bernstein
Editorials..............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News...........................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sporis . .................. ...........Robert Angell
Women's editor........ ...................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph ..w............West Gallogly
relescope ...... .............. ..Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Thomas. E. Dewey M. A. Klavet
Paul G. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E: R. Meiss
Elizabeth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
George Rei glel Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
D~orothy, Monfort 3 A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Harry B. Grundy W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
Frances Oberholtzer Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr
Robert E. Adams . W. Hume, Jr Sara Waller
Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett

SLANG AND THE COLLEGIAN
When one undertakes the study of philology, es-
pecially of our own tongue, he is beset with two
problems - English our forefathers handed down
to us and English "as she is spoke". If an accurate
account were taken, it would more than probably be
found that the greater part of the student popula-
tion discourses in a dialect which is strange to the
outside world and yet serves the same purpose in
conversation that god old formal Anglo-Saxon does
among the older generation.
Slang seems as vital to the student as the war-
whoop was to the Indian. "How's to go to class ?"-
"How are you hittin' 'em" - "that prof hands out
a mean bluebook" - these are but a few illustra-
tions of the special code by means of which verbal
messages are delivered on the campus. Contrary
to some lay opinion, highbrow Bostonian-words are
out of style among students. No wonder, then, that
when a born-and-bred-in-New-York man, of
"Toidy-toid street" fame, once paid a visit to his
son at a large university, he immediately ex-
claimed, after listening for several moments to the
talk of a group of students, "This is just like
home." -
We have all heard vaudeville performers swing
from "Russian Rag" to selections of Debussy,
Drdla, or Tschaikowski with apparently the great-
est facility; but anyone who has noticed the meth-
ods of musical pedagogy knows that such talent is
unusual, and that the rule in teaching the classical
is to eliminate ragtime completely from the stu-
dent's musical diet for the time being. Does this
point to the danger in slang? If we can George
Ade it without losing our ability to converse on oc-
casion as becomes a university man or woman, all
well and good; but when our college jargon has as-
sumed a weedlike place in our conversation and
crowded out of our vocabulary the mother tongue
as it is spoken in cultured society, it is time to do
some pruning.
Those greasy shoulders in the Wisconsin game
looked bad, even to a Michigan audience. Happily,
it proved to be merely a case of too great anxiety
to get on the floor for the second half - the rub-
ber didn't have time to towel off the liniment.
"Fox Men Urge Federal Fur Farm in Michi-
gan" -- Detroit headline. Why not? A glance at
our campus would convince anybody that this must
be the center of consumption.
A ten o'clock curfew is being rigidly enforced in
Dublin. What would the midnight roll-seekers do
if such a law were passed in Ann Arbor?

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
G RAH
Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for'
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every twoI
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. m.., and
12:10 pjn.

®... .® ® . . .e. ,

999

TAXI

999

4
a-

A Dodge Car
and Dod g e
Service
enough said ,,,

999

TAXI

999

JAI UARY
S M T W T

2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31
me

4
18
2

5
12
19
26

6
23
20
27

F S
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29

I

.1

I

Why are you so Insistent?

. ,

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advrtising ......................................D. P. Joyce
classifieds........... ...........................Robt. 0. Kerr
Publication ......................................F. M.HIeath
Accounts...... ................................. E. R. Priehs
Circuglation. ..........................V. F. Hillery
Assistants:
R. W. Lambrecht P. H Huthinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter, Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slaws6n
J. 1. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth ,fR. G. Burcbell

Last season's hats turn-

ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

i

Because

YI

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Persons wishing to secure information concerning news fdr any
issue of The Diailyshould see the night editor, who hai full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1921.
Night Editor-T. W. SARGENT, JR.

NOTICE! ALL SENIORS
Due to labor conditions affect-
ing our engravers and printers
the final date for taking of Sen-
ior pictures for the Michigan-
ensian IS JANUARY 22. Ar-
range for sittings immediately.
Saturday, January 22 is the final
date. Don't wait until the last
few days.

fir. esimer's Beefsteak
Dinners are so Hard

to Lual

i
i

THE HONOR SYSTEM ON TRIAL
Beginning with small classes, and carrying pro-
visions 'for choice of supervised or unwatched ex-
aminations the honor -system is to be given a fair
trial in the Literary college. If it succeeds, one of
the greatest forward moyements yet taken in the
University will stand accomplished. If it fails,
there will be plenty of alibis: the lit school is too
large and too loosely organized; the honor system
has seldomsucceeded "in large universities; and a
host of others.
The principal point to be made is that the honor
system's success or fall depends entirely on the re-
action of the same student body which, in class
meetings assembled, voted unanimously for its
adoption. This very significant fact - that the
initiative came from the students and not from the
faculty- is a highly promising sign. The senior
class, which was the first to vote for the new
regime of honor in examinations, is to be the first
to put it in effect; and the example of that class
should prove a tremendous influence in favor of
successful adoption throughout the entire college.
There are two catdinal rules of attitude which
must be followed to make the honor system a suc-
cess: first, that the person giving help shall be con-
sidered as guilty as the one receiving it; second,
that failure to report the cheater is dishonorable.
The observance of these rules and the enforcement
of honesty by strict trial and punishment of cheat-
ers is essential. Minnesota has upheld the system
for five years by holding to these rules. The En-
gineering college here, a smaller and more hetero-
geneous body, has enforced it with a remarkable de-
gree of success: The whole-question is simply one
of attitude.
The students of Michigan's largest college have
voluntarily taken upon themselves thestask of up-
holding and abiding by the honor system. What
we have started w'e have generally carried through.
GOING TOO FAR
Last year The Daily ran an editorial stating that
the good old custom of shuffling the feet to let a
movie operator know about dimness or faulty fo-
cussing is a blessing; and that such action, to ex-
press disapproval of a poor film or of a poor vaude-
ville shove, has much to justify it. We still think
the same, and represent most of the theater-going
student body in that-opinion.
But there is a limit which any college man of
sense can name as well as we can. When Michi-
gan students go to the absolutely unjustifiable ex-
tent of throwing rotten eggs, ante bellum fruit, and-
a hail of coppers at the performers in any enter-
tainment, no matter how si'mple, those students are
getfing entirely too collegiate for a University of
the size and prestige and supposed discretion of
Michigan. This is no Siwash. A theatrical enter-
prise is a business deserving decent public consid-
eration and protection; and, which is much more
to the point, a Michigan man is supposed to be a
gentleman..

I

i

i2

r

Biggest Turkey in Michigan at Poul-
try Show this week. Seybold and Ess-
linger Bldg., Fourth Avenue.-Adv.
Feathered Aristocracy struts on
midway at Poultry Show, on Fourth
Avenue.-Adv.

Opposite D. U. R. Station
Just Above Rae Theatre

he Teles-ope

r

William in a fit insane
Thrust his head beneath a train ;
All were surprised to find
How it broadened William's mind.
- Telescope Nov. 2.
The above has so moved one of the 947 Williams
on the campus that he has risen to fathomless
depths and now comes forward with the following
gem:
I just have read with deepest pain
Of William's fate beneath the train.
How touching is his sad demise
No doubt he left some broken ties.
And yet with Bill no fault I find
'Tis always well to train the mind.
And at the inquest did they find
A load was on poor Willie's mind?
But 'twere a waste of thought, I say
To smear Bill o'er the right of way.
Yet "Dust to dust" - Bill doped it fine,
They're needing ballast on the line.
How to Be the Life of the Party
LESSON III
In order to establish a background for many of
your stories try to give the impression that you are
a man of affairs with the ladies. Toward this end
you might begin by remarking, "Yeh, it's all off
between my girl and me."
If you're in polite circles and everybody is too
polite to ask you why, just say, "We had a quar-
rel. She wanted me to buy her a fur coat for
Xmas, and I told her that I didn't really care a
wrap for her and wouldn't." Then laugh boister-
ously so all may know that the quip has been
sprung.
Also you might chivalrously add, "But at that,
she acted like a lady. She even returned every-
thing I had ever given her. And, of course, under
those circumstances I did the only thing possi-
ble."
By this time. if you have carefumy studied the
previous lessons, your audience will be so agog
with attention that somebody will ask:
"W/hat did you do ?"
In a holier-than-thou tone of voice you answer:
"Why -naturally I returned everything I had
ever taken away from her, including a box of pow-
der and stick of rouge."
Famous Closing Lines
"A reel sport," he murmured as the fellow be-
gan loudly applauding the film.
NOAH COUNT.

h 1

Claude

1'OVVII'S

ew

Lik

"ClothiU

'Amolah,
Ar-%

OVERCOATS

It 's "just
when

like finding 'em,'
you can buy such
at Brown's at

men -
coats

WINTER COATS
Madam! - How would you like to
buy your winter coat at a saving
like this:

$5, $6, $8, $10, $12, $15

$5, $6, $8, $10 AND $15

Men !
ing

SHEEPSKINS
Just what you have been look-
for. Your choice of Sheep-
skins in this sale at

WOMEN'S SUITS
Just watch them go! Women's smart
suits priced in this great sale
as low as

$7.50 AND $10.00

$5, $8, $10 AND $12.50

MEN'S SUITS
Response to this sale has been wonder-
ful. It just proves that real value was
what the men of Ann Arbor were
waiting for-priced at
$5, $8, $12 AND $15

WAISTS
Just the dainty, pretty, modestly priced
styles that go so far to freshen up the
mid-winter wardrobes. Voiles
and Georgettes at
$1.00, $1.50 AND $2.00

Stop!

Loop!

R~ea~I

Hundreds of Pairs of Men's and Ladies' Shoes at a saving of
50 cents and up
Think of the wonderful saving you can make at this store

CLAVUDE
120 N. FOURTH AVENU~E

EIOWN
EASTSIDE OF COURT HOUSE

l/

pp.

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