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January 12, 1921 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-12

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THE WEATHER
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VOL. XXXI. No. 72. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

DISARM WORLD OR
BUILD Bils'NAVY,'
STATES DANIEL

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENT
PRESENTED AS ONLY
ALTERNATIVE

IS)

SECRETARY WOULD GIVEt
HARDING NAVAL PLAN
Would Suggest World Conference if<
President-elect Harding Seeks
Advie
(Bys Associated Press)n t
Washington, Jan. 11.-An interna-
tional agreement, "with all, or practic-t
ally all, the nations guaranteeing an
end of competition in navy building,"
was presented as the only alternativet
to the building by the United States of
a navy powerful enough "to command
the respect and fear of the world," by
Secretary Daniels in testimony today
before the house naval affairs com-
mittee.
Mr. Daniels appeared in connection
with the committee's consideration of
the subject of disarmament. He dis-
missed as unworthy of discussion a
third proposal for an Amerian navy
less than equal to the most powerful
sea power in the world, "because it is4
a waste of money to spend money on
an agency of war which would beI
helpless'if needed."
Advice to Harding9
Mr. Daniels outlined the advice
which he said he would give to Pres-
Ident-elect Harding should he be asked
for counsel. This advice took the
form of a suggestion that Mr. Harding
invite all nations to meet with repre-
sentatives of the United States in a
disarmament conference. Authority
for such action was given by the naval,
appropriation act of 1916, the secre-
tary said, adding that if President
Wilson "should call such a conference,
it would be impossible for him to make
recommendations before his term ex-
pires."
Should Adopt Plan
"If Mr. Harding should do me the
honor to ask my advice on the sub-
ject," said Mr. Dainels, "I would un-
hesitatingly say to him: 'If the Unit-
ed States is not to become at once a
member of the league of nations, I be-
lieve some plan should be adopted at
once to obtain an agreement for a re-
duction of armaments'."
Naval Holiday
Characterizing a naval holiday be-
tween the United States, Great Britain
and Japan, provided for in the pend-
ing resolution introduced by Senator
Borah, of Idaho, as a "half-way meas-
ure," Mr. Daniels reiterated his op-
position to this country entering into
such an agreement.
Students Not On
Probation Desire
Efficiency Tests
Many students, in addition to those
on probation, have expressed a desire
to take the mental tests to be given
in the near future by the bureau of
mental tests and measurements. Al-
though the number of students on
probation who are required to take the
tests is large, yet a limited number of
those students who desire to ascertain
their general intelligence and habits
of reading will be given a chance to
do so.
The tests which will be given by the
bureau of mental tests and measure-
ments were recently authorized by
the faculty. They are to be given with
the express purpose of benefiting the
probation students and will show

them not only the causes for their
poor work, but in addition will form
a partial basis for advising them as
to their future course.
The number of the tests #will vary
in different cases and will require an
hour or two to take. They are said
to be somewhat similar to the recent
army tests and will measure the stu-
dent's general intelligence without
covering any particular subject.

PUPPETS TO SHOW
HERE TWICE TODAY
Tony Sarg's puppets will present
'Rip Van Winkle" at 3:30 o'clock this
afternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall and "Olla Podrida" at 8 o'clock
tonight.
Many and varied are the antics of
the marionettes, and through improv-
ed devices they are capable of ac-
tion and expression remarkably hu-
man. By using the 24 strings sprout-
ing from their fingers and joints and
by the use of specially designed sock-
ets at the elbows, hips, knees and
ankles, Sarg contrives to make the1
puppets capable of almost every con-
ceivable movement.]
A recent article in the "Outlook"
refers to the marionette show as the]
best of its kind in the country, while
Tony Sarg is called the master of
the American puppets.
The performances are to be given
under the auspices of the resident
alumnae of Smith and Wellesley col-£
leges, and the proceeds from the
shows will be turned over to the en-
dowment funds of the two schools.
THREE SMALLPOX CASES
APPEAR AMONG STUDENTS
HEALTH SERVICE WARNS THOSE
UNVACCINATED TO SAFE-
GUARD SELVES
Reports from the University Health
service reveal that three smallpox
cases and one case of scarlet fever1
have developed since vacation. As a.
period of ten days elapses between
the time of exposure and the actual a-
pearance of symptoms of smallpox
it is likely that all three cases were
contracted during vacation.
Dental Freshman Exposed
Freshmen of the Dental college have
been exposed, a member of the class
having developed smallpox in the
past few days. All members of the
class and all students with whom the
other two men have mingled will be
vaccinated as soon as possible.
Although all of the men who are now
ill are expected to recover, every pre-
caution will be taken by the Health
service to prevent the spread of the
disease. Any unvaccinated person
who is suddenly taken sick with fever,
vomiting, and especially backache
without any definitely known cause,
should be on the lookout for an erup-
tion, which will break out on the third
day after such sickness at which time
he will be feeling much better.
Immunity Length Unknown
The question of the limit of the dur-
ation of immunity through vaccination
can not be given as a rule to apply
to all cases. However, any one who
has felt the effects of a definite reac-
tion after vaccination is as safe as he
can be from contracting smallpox. If
the vaccination did not affect him in
this way or if he has never been vac-
cinated, he should safe-guard himself
and others by having it done at once.
EDMONDS ELECTED HEAD OF
PHARMACOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Dr. C. D. Edmonds, assistant dean
of the Medical school, was elected
president of the Pharmacological and
Experimental Therapeutics socety,
while Dr. F. G. Novy, professor of
Bacteriology, was elected president of
the society of Experimental Pathology
at a meeting of the Federated Biolog-

ical societies held recently in Chi-
cago.
Dr. W. P. Lombard, retiring presi-
dent of the Physiological society, has
held the executive office for the past
three years. At present Michigan hias
two of the four presidents of the Fed-
erated Biological societies.
QUESTION OF HONOR SYSTEM
TO BE DEBATED BY ALPHA NU
"Resolved, That the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts should
adopt the honor system for all exam-
inations," will be the subject debat-
ed by Alpha Nu at its next regular
meeting at 7:30 o'clock Thursday
night in its club rooms on the fourth
floor of University hall.
The meeting has been advanced one
night so as not to conflict with the
appearance of the next speakeron the
Oratorical association's program,
James Hamilton Lewis, next Friday
night.

MANY INVITED TO
ITHLETIC BANQUET~
Dr. Joseph McCracken, Famous UnIt-
versity of Penn. Athlete to be
Principal Speaker
S. C. A. TO BE DINNER HOST
TUESDAY NIGHT AT UNION
More than 200 invitations to attend
an All-athletic banquet, to be given by
the Students' Christian association at 6
o'clock next Tuesday night in the Un-
ion, have been mailed to athletes,
coaches, and managers. in the different
branches of sport.
The principal speaker of the evening
will be Dr. Joseph C. McCracken, dean
of the Pennsylvania medical college
and professor of surgery at St. John's
university in Shanghai, China. Other
speakers will be Prof. William A.
Frayer, of the history department and
member of the board in control of
athletics, and Carl Johnson, '20.
President Marion L. Burton was ex-
pected to talk but is unable to do so
due to a conflict of dates.
Is Remarkable Man
"Dr. McCracken is one of the most
remarkable men who has graduated
from any college iir the last 20 years,"
said L. G. Reiman, '16, of the S. C. A.
"He graduated from Pennsylvania in
1901 and played on the football team
for four years, the first two years as
guard and the last two as fullback.
Dr. McCracken was also a member of
the track team and in '99 captained the
team. In '98 he broke the intercol-
legiate record in the shot put and the
hammer throw. The same year he
broke the world's record In the ham-
mer throw. He is the man who per-
fected the triple turn in the hammer
throw.
"The doctor was a member of the
American Olympic team competing
in Paris in 1900. In these games he
placed second in the shot put and third
in the hamrmer throw.
"In addition to this he was president
of the Pennsylvania union and the S.
C. A., and for four years president
of his class."
Wieman General Chairman
Tad Wieman, '21, is general chair-
man of the committee in charge of the
banquet, and George Duffield, '23L, is
chairman of the program committee.
Athletes who have received invitations
are requested to communicate immed-
iately with Reiman at the S. C. A. as
to whether they will be able to at-
tend.
PRESIDENT AND TWO DEANS
TO SPEAK AT SENIOR SMOKER
Tags for Affair Offered on Campus
and At the Door for
85 Cents
President Marion L. Burton, Dean
John R. Effinger, and Dean Mortimer
E. Cooley have been secured as the
principal speakers for the combined
smoker of the Senior lits and engi-
neers to be held Thursday night at
the Union.
In an attempt to assure the accept-
ance of the event as an annual affair
with the two senior classes, the com-
mittee in charge is doing everything
possible to provide an attractive pro-
gram, and a large turnout from each
of the classes Is expected.
Music for the occasion will be pro-
vided by George Rodgers' orchestra,
and several features hve been prom-
ised by men in charge of the musical

program. Tags for the smoker may be
secured on the campus up until the
time of the smoker, at which time
they will be' sold at the door. The
price of the tags is 25 cents.
FRESH GLEE CLUB TRY OUTS
INCREASE MEMBERSHIP TO 40
About a dozen more tryouts for the
Freshman Glee club appeared at the
Union Monday night bringing the total
number of men in the club to 40.
Frank L. Thomas, director of the club,
has places for 20 more men and an
accompanist. Any freshmen who wish
to try out for these places should see
Mr. Thomas as soon as possible at
his studio in the School of Music.
The first rehearsal will be held at
7 o'clock tomorrow night in the sec-
ond floor reading room at the Union,
and all tryouts who were accepted
must be present. The club is open
to freshmen of all colleges.

Ann Arbor Industries Hard Hit 1uy
Nation Wide Industrial Slump

Although the industrial slump
which has resulted in the unemploy-
ment of hundreds of thousands of
men throughout the country is still
unabated, indications are that this se-
rious condition may be remedied in
from two to three months, according
to several prominent local manufac-
turers. At the present time a general
lack of work prevails in most of the
more important industries of the city.
H. D. Runciman, general manager
of the Hoover Steel Ball company,
stated yesterday that the Hoover
works had closed on Dec. 22 in an-
ticipation of reopening Jan. 3. "At this
time, however," Mr. Runciman con
tinued, "we found conditions even
worse than before, and in conse-
quence are now closed indefinitely.
The Hoover company is dependent up-
on the automobile industry to a large
extent, and until these concerns re-
sume business, we will be forced to
STUDY IN EUROPE HARD05
CONDITIONS UNPLEASANT
STUDENTS LACK FOOD, CLOTHING,
MEDICAL ATTENTION; AND
ACCOMMODATIONS
New York, Jan. 11.-Students in
Central Europe unable to get sa warm
meal oftener than once in every two
or three days, others sleeping in rail-
way stations or bath rooms, tuber-
culosis and severe anaemia rampant,
women students still wearing the
clothes they had in 1914, and men
wearing frayed uniforms buttoned up
to the neck to conceal the absence of
shirts - these are some of the con-
ditions revealed by the department
for the European students' fund of the
American relief administration, of
which Herbert Hoover is chairman.
One Meal a Day
Large numbers of students in Aus-
trian universities are fed by students'
mensas, or kitchens, which provide
food at half the actual cost Even un-
der these conditions hundreds can af-
ford to eat only one meal a day, ac-
cording to the relief administration.
Rooming conditions are equally
bad. Heating in winter is impossible
for the student, and he must pro-
vide his own light. Students have
been found to be sharing one room
and a kitchen with six or eight pep-
ple. In a suburb of Vienna a former
war hospital has been converted into
barracks for students.
Health Poor
These conditions have not been
without results in the health of the
students, the relief administration
points out. A recent examination of
1,600 students revealed the fact that
240 were ill. Of the 240, 144 were
tubercular. Students can not afford
medical assistance of any kind. A
woman student whose hands were
covered with sores could not get oint-
ment for them except by going with-
out food.'
JANUARY TELEPHONE BOOK
APPEARS SOON; FEW CHANGES
Showing no unusual increase in the
amount of subscribers, the January,
1921, copy of the telephone directory,
which is gnow in the hands of the
printers, will appear within the next
few days.

operate at greatly reduced produc-
tion.
Situation Relieved
"The situation has been somewhat
relieved the past week, and our ex-
pectations are that the New York andi
Chicago shows will remedy the de-
pression in the automobile industry,"
Mr. Runciman said when questioned
regarding the reopening of the Hoov-
er company.
Officials at the Production Foundry
company declared that the light was
breaking and that two months would
see the resumption of normal condi-
tions. This company is engaged in
the manufacture of grey iron castings
and at present is operating at 10 per
cent of its normal production.
At the Motor Products company]
business is picking up, but it will take
two months time for it to get back
into regular production,, according to
the president of the corporation. It
is engaged in the making of wind-
shields. Like many other local man-
ufacturers this company is dependent
upon the automobile industries, and
its force is reduced to about 25 per
cent of its usual size.
Another Firm Bard Hit
Another firm which was hard hit is
the American Broach and Machine
company. "Even as early as last
May we felt the approaching depres-
sion which reached its maximum in
October,"stated F. J.sLaPoint, pres-
ident of the company. "I look for
better conditions in about three
months," he went on. This concern
manufactures broaching machines and1
does all kinds of internal machine
work. The plant is now closed for
about 10 days to take inventory and
previous to this had worked at ap-
proximately one-third capacity.
COMMISSION CCPTS-
TENTATIVE CHARTER
DOCUMENT TO BE DISTRIBUTED
BEFORE BEING VOTED ON
AT ELECTIONS
Ann Arbor's tentative charter,
written by Prof. Edwin C. Goddard
of the Law school, has been accepted
by the city charter commission, of
which Professor Goddard is the chair-
man, and it has gone to the printers.
Copies of the proposed charter will
be ready for distribution in a few
days, it is expected. The time of
general elections to be held April 4
has been set as the date for voting
on the charter. Early publication of
the document is expected to enable
everyone to gain an accurate knowl-
edge of the provisions so that they
can vote with intelligence on the
proposition.
Simplicity is the most noticeable
fact about the new charter, officials
say, and its object has been to give a
broad general rule of government
rather than directions for every de-
tail. This will also make easier the
understanding of the document by
those not technically trained in law.
Swimming Pool Fund Reaches $10,070
Yesterday's total for the Union
swimming pool fund was $10,070. Most
of the subscriptions received, in the
past few days have come through the
mail, student solicitors having report-
ed earlier.

FEW REPORTS NET
$4009T CLOSE OF
DAY IN SIC.A. DR IVE
CONTRIBUTIONS VARY r!LOM $1
TO $5, ACCORDING TO
CANVASSERS
ONLY 29 SOLICITORS
REPORT INITIAL NIGH.T
Slocum, '22, with Total of $0 Is High
Man at End of, Campign's
First Attempt
Reports from only a few of the so-
licitors in the Student Christian as-
sociation drive for $5,000 showed a
total of $400 last night. Th average
contribution was about $3 per man
when the reports were tabulated, and
canvassers reported a high percentage
of the men interviewed as making
contributions. The sums given taried
from $1 to several contributions of
$5 and a few higher.
Only 29, one-sixth of the total num-
ber of committeemen, made reports
last night. Officials were not sur-
prised at the poor showing of the y
men, however, as they said many had
stated they would not be able to be-
gin work until the second night. The
low total subscribed is due to the fact
that the solicitors were not out, not
to refusals, as the figures showed that
a great majority of the men visited
contributed.
Wieman's Team High
High man for the first night was
Harold H. Slocum, '22, with $30,to his
credit. Figures on the other men were
not available, but the high team was
quoted as that of E. E. Wieman, '21.
Competition among the teams and
among the individuals is expected to
run high in the later days of the
campaign as a steak dinner will be
given by the association to the high
team and to the three high men.
"Although reports have been slow
in coming in, I am highly pleased with
the results of the campaign so far,"
said Donald Porter, '21, chairman of
the drive. "The average number of
subscriptions to each solicitor who
has reported is encouraging. If the
work started tonight keeps up at this
pace, I am confident the drive will
reach the $5,000 mark before the last
day of the campaign is over."
Faculty Members Support
Prominent faculty members gave
unreserved support of the new form
of the S. C. A. at a banquet given for
faculty men at the tnion last night.
Several men spoke,'endorsing the plan
which the S. C. A. has just carried
out of reverting to the old form of
organization an leaving the Y. M. C.
A. idea behind as too limited in scope.
Among those who spoke favoring the
new plan were Profs. Edwin C. God-
dard of the Law school, F. N. Scott of
the rhetoric department, Deans Ed-
ward H. Kraus of the Summer ses-
sion, M. L. Ward of the Dental col-
lege, and Shirley W. Smith, secretary
of the University.
2,000 COPIES OF CHIMES
PRINTF D; ON SALE TOMORROW
Two thousand copies of Chimes will
be printed with the issue which will
be placed on the news stands tomorrow

afternoon. The additional issues over
last month are due to the fact that
the last number was completely sold
out. Copies which go by mail will
be sent out today.
GLEE CLUB MEETS TONIGHT
TO PREPARE FOR CONCERT
In preparation for its spring con-
cert which is to be out of the ordin-
ary in that there will be vaudeville in
addition to music, the Glee club will
meet at 7:15 o'clock'tonight in the as-
sembly hall at the Union. Members
are requested to turn in all old music.

NO

IS MICHIGAN

ASLEEP?

IS MICHIGAN ASLEEP?
What do you think about it?
It is an accusation that has been hurled directly in the face of
Michigan men.
It was so directed as to apply to every phase of college life.
Here are a few of the things at which it was aimed:
Are Michigan men here to absorb book learning or are they
here to get an education?
Are Michigan men thinking or are they allowing what mental
powers they have to be wasted in frivolous discussions of teas,
dansants, et cetera?
Is everything on the Michigan campus as you would have it, or
is there something that has occurred to rise in you a "pet peeve"?
Again - what do you think about it?
The Michigan Daily is compiling the sentiment of the campus
on the charge, "Michigan is asleep." Discussions are invited from
everyone and anyone connected in any way with the University.
Your name will not be used if you so desire, but all communica-
tions on the subject must be signe4 as an evidence of good faith.
Address them to the Sunday Editor, Michigan Daaily, Ann Ar-
bor. They should not exceed 250 words in length and should be
mailed not later than Jan. 17, 1921.

' I '
i
!
I

t

CHIMES TRYOUTS

New men wanted on business
staff of Michigan Chimes. Try-
outs report at Press building
office between 1 and 4 o'clock,
Wednesday or Thursday.

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