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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE Ml

SAN DAILY

l

tr4tgttn Bal-Ill

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN"
Published every morning except Monday during the Univzr-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATEDPRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republidation of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.S-0.
Offices:Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phoges: Business, 966; Edito-ial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the E ditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Sinaigned commaunicatios will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloases postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
prassed in tke oommu~iostions.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertio.

;

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414

MANAGING EDITOR.............GEORGE O. BROPHY, JR.
'Naws mitor ,.........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night lEditors-
T. .1Ht Adama H. W. Hitchcock
J. A. Bernstein J. E. McManis
B. P. Campbell T. W. Sargent, Jr..
7, I. Dakin-'
Editorals.........Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, C. H. Murchison
Sports ............................ ....Robert Angell
Assistant News...-..*.......... . .. P. Lovejoy
Women's Editor................................ Mary D. Lane
Telegraph. ............... .............West Gallogly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Thomas J. Whinery Harry B. Grundy
Paul G. Weber R. W. Wrobleski Winefred Biethan
Almena Barlow George Reindel Robert D. Sage
Elizabeth Vickery Dorothy Monfort Marion Nichols
G. . Clark Minnie Muskatt Frances Oberholtzer

V. N" au. .a

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
:Adveirtising....................) .Joyce
Credits and Classified Ads .................. ....J. W. Rawings
Publication......................................F. M. Heath
Accounts ........................................... R. Prihs
Circulaion.. . . . . . ..C. P. caie
Assistants
R, W. Lamhrecht E. G. Gower Lester W. Millard
Robert . Kerr Sigmund Runstadter V. N. Hillery
The night editors for this week will be: Monday
night, Hugh Hitchcock; Tuesday night, T. W.
Sargent, Jr.; Wednesday night, B. P. Campbell;
Thursday night, T. H. Adams; Friday night. J. I.
Dakin ; Saturday night, J. A. Bernstein.
Persons wishing to secure iformation cncenning news for any
issue of The Daily shouldtsee the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The University comprises eight schools and col-
leges as follows: The College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts, the Colleges of Engineering and
Architecture, the Medical School, the Law School,
the College of Pharmacy, the Homoeopathic Med-
ical School, the College of Dental Surgery, and the
Graduate School. Each of the four colleges re-
quires for admission the completion of a full four-
year course in a standad high school; two years of
collegiate work are required for admission to the
two Medical schools and the Law school; while a
bachelor's degree is necessary for addmission to the
Graduate School.
LEARN ITi
Hail to the colors that float in the light,
Hurrah for the yellow and blue;
Yellow the stars as they ride through the night,,
And reel in a rollicking crew.
Yellow the fields where ripens the grain,
And yellow the moon on the harvest wane;
Hail to the colors that float in the light,
Hurrah for the yellow and blue.
Blue are the billows that bow to the sun
When yellow-robed morning is due.
Blue are the curtains that evening has spun,
The slumbers of Phoebus to woo.
Blue are the blossoms, to memory dear;
And blue is the sapphire, that gleams like a
tear.
Hail to the ribbons that nature has spun,
Hurrah for the yellow and blue.
Here's to the college whose colors we wear,
Here's to the hearts that are true,
Here's to the maid of the golden hair,
And eyes that are brimming with blue.
Garlands of bluebells and maize intertwine,
And hearts that are true, and voices com-
bine-
Hail to the college whose colors we wear,
Hurrah for the yellow and blue..
Some of the freshmen among us did not know the
above song when it was sung with heads uncov-
ered between halves at the Case game. Some of
the upperclassmen were a bit hazy after the sum-
mer's absence. "The Yellow and Blue" is Michi-
gan's college soig. Let's get it-all of it-now,
and make the stands ring to its strains at the
M. A. C. contest this Saturday.
HOW WILL YOU VOTE?'
Up to the last decade at least, political views, like
religion, were to a great extent a condition of
birth. A man unhesitatingly and without fore-
thought would place a cross over the Republican or
Democratic ballot because his ancestors for genera-
tions had belonged to that party; and the man's son
in turn, wuld grow up to vote the ballot that his
father had voted.
But with the more widespread advent of educa-
tion men are learning to think for themselves. They
are learning to seek out the significance of a party
and not merely its name; they desire to give each

political plank the saw-test, and to discard the ones
which promise to splinter or split.
The men and women of the University of Michi-
gan are among those who have experienced the
benefits of higher education. It is up to them to
take nothing for granted politically. The issues at
stake this year are undoubtedly more serious than
any sihce the Civil war. The questions of bol-
shevism, League of Nations, terms of peace, capi-
tal and labor, problems which affect the govern-'
ment to its very foundations, and upon the satis-
factory settlement of which the fate of the whole
federal structure depends, are among the supr-
latively grave issues to be considered before an in-
telligent vote can be cast.
The first Tuesday of November is only a matter
of weeks. Students must not allow their polities
to be affected by custom. They should seek out,
assemble, and carefully study the issues of the ap-
pro.ching election, and then after thoughtful de-
liberation, decide which man or party will be of the
greatest, use to the United States, and will carry
this country most surely and most quickly out from
a period of war and unrest, and into an unprece-
dented era of peace and industry.
SECTIONAL CLUBS AND MICHIGAN
In previous years the sectional clubs of the Uni-
versity have filled an important niche in the lives of
a great many students. Frequent smokers and get
together meetings have been held. These gather-
ings served their purpose well. They enabled
neighbor to meet neighbor and recalled for a brief
period "that home-town" feeling.
Had they done no more than this, they would
have been worth while. They have however served
a much larger purpose. Much of our promising
freshman and sophomore material would now be
attending other univeisities had not the various
members of some sectional club convinced them of
the advantages of our university. We need these
coming leaders. We shall need others in the future.
Sectional clubs will do their best service reorgan-
izing soon so that they will each have a fully ,de-
veloped "Michigan" program to carry out when the
Christmas holidays arrive.
GET IN THE BLOCK "M"
Football at Michigan holds few more impressive
moments for the spectator nd the player, than when
at a signal hundreds of blue and yellow flags rise
intheir ranks from seats where only the drab of
clothing and faces reigned before, and transform anj
entire section of the stand into an immense and
beautiful block "M". Raised by living and loyal
Michigan hands, it stands for the spirit of the Uni-
versity as no other emblem could possibly express
it. The team plays better for it.
Remembering the striking effect of last year's
block "M" at the Minnesota game, officials have de-
cided to use the idea to the utmost this year, and
at the Chicago encounter Nov. 13 will issue more
than eighteen thousand flags for an enlarged "M"
which will be located in the south stands instead of
the north, as last year. In order to avoid the con-
fusion of last fall, every student who wants to take
part in the "M" is urged to send in his coupon at
once and secure hi ticket. Seniors, juniohs, and
sophomores are eligible, and should be glad of the
chance to hold a flag in Michigan's emblem.
The Telescope
The Co-ed's Lament
Why do I go to college?
For every boy who sits near me
I wonder what's the use,
Looks like the very deuce.
A Natural Enough Mistake
"What's all the excitement about?"
"Two Japanese students started fighting."
"What was wrong?"
"Why one of them thought 'How Dry I Am'
was the school anthem and wanted to fight when
the other one wouldn't stand up when it was
played."

To the Rushee :
With gloves of white and hair slicked back,
Trips a merry little miss.
The Sisters all flock down the walk
And, pledge her with a kiss.
But Oh! for the little lonely ones
This day can't pass too soon.
It may be time for tea for some,
But for them-just afternoon.
For the Royal Order of Oil Cans we nominate
the bird who sleeps above you in a double-decker
and who sets the alarm clock on the floor before
retiring so it will be sure and awaken you at the
time he wants to get up.
Epitaph
Here lies my girl,
And for the best,
Because it gives
Us both a rest.
HARTIN HOLDS UP NEW D.U.R. LINE.-
Free Press.
Well, turn about is fair play.
Famous Closing Lines
"Here's where a little bit goes a long way," said
the ant as he fell off the Woolworth building.
NOAH COUNT.

M

DETROIT" UNITED LINES
In Effect June 15, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detrixit at 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9: 10 p. in.
Mimiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m
and every two hours to 9:00' p. ni.,
also 11:00 p. mn. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-17:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
0 , OBER
S M W T F S
1 2
3 4 5678 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
11en: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
lung and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.
r a

VAN'S LUNCH

- --

GRAHAM

.

Where they all go

1116 So. University Ave.

TWO STOR ES
hooks and kSupplies for all Colleges at
both Stores

"" ,-
'1MI rr''"

Both Ends of Diagonal Walk

l

For

STUDY LAMPS

and all kinds of

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES

go to.

Ready to Serve
From 11a.m. to 1p.m. - 5 to 1p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of rice
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
45 cents
CHINESE and AMERICAI Style
Short Orders
Qanig Tung Lo
613 E. Liberty S*.
-NUS
PENCILS

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

PHONE 213

200 WASHINGTON ST.

. .

/.

s

E._..__

i

Up the Stairs

1

in Nickel's Arcade

OR the student or prof,
the superb VENUS out-
rivals all for perfect pencil
Work. 17 black degrees and
3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
22,0 FlfthAve. ",
NewYoc /
Ihe l,~world

TO THE

Arcade Cafeteria

.}
a:
_

do

Ir
Typewriters
ALL MAKES
FOR RENT
OR
SALE
TYPEWRITING
NEATLY DONE
Hamilton Business.

Where you may select your meal from
a forty-foot table steaming with -a va-
riety of all kinds of pure food delicious-
ly cooked by experts. Bakery goods
fresh from our own ovens.
Our Special Blend of Coffee with Jer-
sey cream is exceptional.

Economy of Cafeteria

i
service ena-

College
Statt~ and 4William

bles us to serve at lo* prices.

Sts.

C. J. FINGERLE.

DANCING CLASSES
Lessons in ball room dancing,
both for advanced students and
beginners, will start Oct. 11th.
Only 40 students will be enrolled
n each class, thereby insuring
satisfactory results.
Enroll at Studio, 324 E. Huron
street (two blocks west of High
School).
The classes are to te conduct-
ed by
Women may enroll at New-
berry Hall.
MLLE. JEANETTA KBUSZKA
and
PHILIP RAE MILLER, '2

-I

Dinner 11:30 to 1 P.M.

I

Supper 5:30 to 7 P.)

1

L

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