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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 11, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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OFlFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the usefor
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.60.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed ,300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion oifthe Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the ,communications.
"What'sGoing On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR,
News Editor ..... .... ..........Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors- .i
T. H. AdamsH.WHicok
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I- Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor........- -.-. -...-.J- A. Bernstein
editorials.............. Lee Woodruff, .L.lA. Kern, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News.......... ..................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports .................... "................. Robert 'Angell
Women's Editor ...........................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph....................................West Gallogly
,'elescope ........ ...................... . .... .Jack W. Kelly

Josephine Waldo
Paul G. Weber
Elizabeth Vickery
G. E. Clark
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Harry B. Grundy
Prances Oberholtzer
Robert E. Adams
Byron Darnton

Assistants
Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace F. Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
J. A. Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
J. W. Hume, Jr.
H. E. Howlett

M. A. Kaver
E;. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald' P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Wailer

__ _. _ _

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising .................... ---.--. -. D. P. Joyce
'lassifieds.-....................................Robt. O. Kerr
Publication ............ .... ........"..........I'. M. Heath
Accounts......................... ..R........EF. U. Priebhs
Circulation .................-....................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
A. W. Lamlrecht P. H Hutchinson - N. W. Robertson
S. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. s *. Moule D.G. Slawsoin
J. J. Hamel Jr. D. S: Watterworth R. G. Burchell

.y. " au .r Y.

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see thehnight editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1921.-.

Night Editor-HUGH W. HITCHCOCK

The editorial staff and tryouts will meet at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon. The upper staff 'will meet
at 3-45 o'clock.
MISLEADING THE TAXPAYER
An article dealing with the incapacity of the aver-
age university student (is there such a thing?) ap-
peared in the last Detroit Saturday Night, which
for sheer, unthinking inopportunism, cannpt be
beaten.
At the present time the University authorities are
trying to raise the largest appropriation in the his-
tory of the school. A student in the University,
who happens to be taking philosophys hears a pro-
fessor give a lecture on the really deplorable cal-
iber of the university students in this country as
compared to those of other nations. This profes-
sor, himself a product of Scotch and Continental
universities, does maintain that the usual run of
American students are the mental inferiors to their
European cousins of a like age.
The student immediately sits down and sends an
article to the Detroit Saturday Night, which is
printed under the head, "COLLEGE STUDENTS
ARE SEVENTY-TWO PER CENT HQPE-
LESS". In the 'ensuing paragraphs he maintains
that seventy-two per cent of us should not be here at
all, that twenty per cent of us might be capable of
turning out good work, and that only eight per cent
of us are indubitably of college caliber. In reality
the professor, misquoted but not named, maintains
that the statements made do apply to university
students, an entirely different concept in his mind
from college students.
The author of the story goes on to state that
"higher education for the masses is titter rubbish"
and that some day the taxpayers of the state will
rise in revolt at paying for the ever increasing ap-
propriations demanded by our state universities. He
give the impression that what the taxpayers want
is the establishnent of an intellectual aristocracy,
in place of what we now have.
As a matter of fact few of the taxpayers would
ungrudgingly pay their school and university taxes
if it were not for the benefits conferred upon their
sons and daughters, a minimum number of whom
would class as intellectual aristocrats. What they
want, rightly or wrongly, is just the type of uni-
versities which we now have and not the highly
selective group of intellectuals which may be found
in European centers of higher education.
Totally disregarding the influences which diver-
gent national tendencies and ideals have brought to
bear upon our system of education as compared to
the European systems, this student goes ahead,
and, substituting European ideas and concepts,
damns our whole educational system without giving
his readers the chance to discern just how he has
reached "his conclusion. The thing is especially
reprehensible just now when a sensational story
giving only one side of the question may conceiv-
ably' have a deterring influence in the granting of
our much needed appropriation.

HAS IT A PLACE?
Are we being overtaxed by incessant drives for
money, and has religion a place in the Univer-
sity? The answering of these two vital ques-
tions by each individual on the campus will spell
success or defeat for the Students' Christian as-
sociation campaign for funds which it initiates to-
day in order to carry on its work for the coming
year.
The first of these problems offers no excuse.
Although there has been an unusual number of
drives, still their demands have been small, and
according to very liberally figured statistics, the
average-student has not given more than $2.70 to-
wards the total of these various undertakings.
The money derived from this campaign is de-
voted directly to student activities. The most im-
portant of these are the spreading of Michigan
propaganda throughout the state, and the conduct-
ing of Union religious services with the foremost
men of the ecclesiastical world presiding. Only one
salary is drawn from this fund, the clerks at Lane
hall being supported entirely by the churches of
Ann Arbor. One-eighth of the total amount re-
quired is asked from the student body, the re-
mainder being solicited from alumni.
So the first question having been answered sat-
isfactorily, there rests only one condition upon the
success of the S. C. A. drive. The decision is a
matter of opinion and rests with each individual.
If religion has a place in the University, then the
campaign of the Students' Christian association is
justified. If not its activities are doomed to cease.
What do you think? Is the drive worthy of suc-
cess?
"BE ALIVE"
One week has elapsed since the reopening of
school. Classes are in full swing; assignments are
being dealt out recklessly. The bulk of the open
textbook lies en the left hand side. Christmas is
over; exams loom darkly forth in the distance.
Only one month more is allotted to whip each
course into shape for the finals. And still not a
few of us remain in the semi-coma carried over
from two weeks of leisure.
Even the most forgetful seem to have had no
difficulty in remembering President Marion L. Bur-
ton's statement that vacation is a time to vacate,
but to quote the words of a faculty member, the1
President also advised students to "be alive," and
now is the time when this applies. This part of the
semester is one which makes or breaks. An exten-
sion of our Christmas vacation at present may
mean the granting of a permanent one in Febru-
ary. Let's call the hibernation over.
The game of keeping the University clock and
the one on the court house as far apart as possi-
bel is still on. Someday one or the other will ac-
cidentally hit the right time and lose the game.
Let's all root for the campus turnip.
The Telescope
Dear Noah:
One of my eyes is so turned that it gives me the
effect of being cross-eyed. Under these circum-
stances, what do you think you would do?.
. Afflicted.
After considerable thought on the question we
have come to the conclusion that under these same
conditions, we, too, would look cross-eyed.
First stude-That's a great hunting dog you have
there.
Second ditto-You're right. I call him "Doc."
First-Why so?
Second-He never lost a scent.a
The other night when we were going up to our
girl's. house we made a hasty inventory and decided
that about all we had to spend that night was our
time. However, for fear our girl might expect us
to take her out somewhere we decided on an air-
tight alibi.

So we runs up the steps all breathless and wild-
eyed. When our girl asks us what's the matter we
told her that on the way up we had been waylaid
and held up by two highwaymen who pointed a gun
at our head and said:
"Give us your money or we'll blow your brains
out."
By this time our girl is sitting on the edge of her
seat and in a low whisper she asks:
"And what do you say then ?"
"Well," we says to them, 'Blow away; if you've
got a girl in Ann Arbor it's better to be without
brains than to be without money.'"
And our girl, being real clever, took her cue and
we held down the sofa that night.
Why Not Buttercups or Cowslips?
He sent a rather clever collection of flowers be-
fore him. Roses and orchids would have conveyed
an unpleasing impression to Sonia ; dairies charmed
her. - La Parisienne Magazine.
Geraldine writes in to ask whether our college
motto is, "Liberty, fraternity and sorority" or
'Independence is our name."
For once we think "discussion is not the better
part of valor" and so will let some of our more
intrepid readers answer the query.
Pamous Closing Lines
"A picture of misery," he cried as he watched the
victim of the frameup
NOAH COUNT.

JANUARY
M T W T

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F S
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2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 N 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

3
i
1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jaekson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. i., 7:05 a. n.,
8:10 a.,im., and hourly to 9:10 p. mn.
Liiniteds to Jacks on at 8:48 a. mn. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. In. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e,. ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

!Tnnouncement

I
ii

..

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We have decided to make the
following discounts on our en-
tire Stock:

SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

x$100
$ 90
$ 75
$ 60

Suits reduced to
Suits reduced to
Suits reduced to
Suits reduced to

$80.00
$72.00
$60.00
$48.00

-4

Dstinction
$2.00 e.td asp

Or we will give an extra pair
of trousers in place of the dis-
count - This applies on all
orders taken since Dec. 25,
1920.
J. KARL MALCOLM
604 EAST LIBERTY STREET
Tuxedo and Dress Suits included

PHONE 1321

225 EAST LIBERTY

w t

GOODHEW FLORAL CO.

I'

r

%A

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
Both Ends of the Diagonal Wal"k

I

I

CALL US

9 VICTOR RECORDSby
1 TheFlonzaley Quartette
FOR
T1is world-famous musical organization which will be
M E A T7 S heard in recital Monday evening, January 10, at Hill
Auditorium, may also be heard in your own home--
LET US FIGURE YOUR BILL through the medium of Victrola and'Victor Records.
THE They Make Records Onl
CENTURY MARKET
for the Victor Co.
213 N. MAIN,
Your Record Library should include some of these
FlonzaleybQuartet Records:
_ 7450--MOLLY ON THE SHORE. Percy Aldridge Grainger $1.75
-A74578-QUARTET IN A MINOR-Scherzo
(Op. 41, No. 1)......................Schumann $1.75
74579-QUARTET IN D MAJOR-Andante..........Mozart $1.75
I 74596--QUARTET IN Ii MAJOR-Minuet............Mozart $1.75
-=74634-QUARTET IN E MINOR-
Allegro Moderato, etc.................Smetana $1.75
64889-QUARTET NO. 3, IN E FLAT MINOR--
Scherzo .........................Tschaikowsky $1.25
We'll gladly play these over for you. Come in.
Courteous, pleasing and helpful Victor Record Service.
YFOU R F U R S=.
are especially attractive to the
burglar. We can protect you
against loss from burglary at =
home and HOLD UP while THIS OTHER
-IS TH IClEA
abroad for a comparatively small Ts$20
premium. Can you afford to bake TO
the chance? We are the iarge: so $480.00
writers of Fire, Burglary, and
Tornado Insurance iii the Cty
and shall be pleased to advise you
both as to coverage and rates,
R7
INSURANCE eaaig mic House
Phone 401 M 6 TH M N TREET ANN ARBOR
.209 NATIONAL BANK BUitL.UI:;$, 44tlrl 4iP las44;3 . a i m mi?"?la i9ae4 443 i lrrrrl11rrrmrm 4l4 r ,l

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