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January 11, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-11

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
SNOW TODAY

r A SrMIF r. igan

&titn l

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY ANM NIHT WIRE
SERV ICE

VOL. XXXI, No. 71. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTE

i

FA CULTY ADOPTS
HONOR SYSTEM IN
LITEHRRYCOLLEGE
PLAN TO BE TRIED IN SMALL
CLASSES; STUDENTS WILL
SIGN PLEDGES
METHOD PROPOSED AND
ENDORSED BY SENIORS

Prof. Pawlowski Gets Confidential
Government Aeronautical Works
For EngineeringCollege Library
Through the efforts of Prof. Felix ai-mistice. The first volume of this
W. Pawlowski, of the aeronautical de- work, while published in Germany
partment, the library of the engineer- during the war, contains information
ing college has come into possession obtained from the United States and
of confidential government publica- other members of the Allied powers.
tions on aeronautics. Many of these The later, volumes, however, report
were edited during the war for the the results of original German inves-

S

f
i

MiCHIGAN'S FIVE
DROPS GAME TO
'IN DIANA1 30-2

1

Instructors Have Right to Accept
Reject Proposition According
to Desire

or

As a result of the action of the Uni-
versity faculty yesterday afternoon it
unanimously adopting the plan for at
honor system in the literary college as
proposed and endorsed by the senior
class, the honor system will be given
a fair trial in the University. The
faculty is of the opinon that if the
honor system ever is to prove suc-
cessful it will do so now under the
favorable auspices under which it has
come.
The faculty meeting yesterday was
called by special order to consider
the tentative plan for the honor sys-
tem in the literary college as propos-
ed by a committee of seniors and en-
dorsed with practical unanimity by
the senior class. The faculty, by
unanimous vote, adopted the plan, and
has empowered its advisory commit-
tee to work out the details in collab-
oration with a committee of seniors.
Seniors to Select Committee
Under the plan adopted a selec-
tion of a senior honor committee will
be made with the approval of the se-
nior class. All violations of honor in
examinations are to be reported to
this committee, whose decisions in
various cases will be subject to the
approval of the faculty.
The honor system will be introduc-
ed in classes not exceeding 50 where
there is a majority of seniors and
graduate students. A petition is to be
started by a senior in each such class
and circulated for the purpose of as-
certaining how many students are
willing to take an examination under
the honor system. The signers of the
petition pledge themselves to see that
honor is observed by others as well as
observing it themselves. This peti-
tion will be handed to the instructor
at least a week previous to the exam-
ination. He has the right to accept
or to reject it. In case there are some
students who would prefer a proctored
examination, the instructor, if he ac-
cepts the petition, will give the same
examination to such students in a dif-
ferent room if pospible.
Success Determines Extension
If the future procedure of the sys-
tem proves a success, it will be ex-
tended under the senior plan, to the
junior, sophomore, and freshmen
classes successively, as far as exist-
ing intermingling of classes will per-
mit.
The faculty's purpose of beginning
the system in small classes is to in-
sure the success of the system at the
start, since there is naturally a uni-
ty in smaller classes and among se-
niors. Although the method is, per-
haps, in small classes less necessary
than in large ones, yet it was decided
essential to promulgate the idea and
to create a spirit in its favor by start-
ing with smaller units.
Faculty Appreciates Spirit
The advisory committee of seven,
with Dean John R. Effinger of the
literary college, will meet at an ear-
ly date in all probability with the
committee of seniors and work out
the . details of the plan. The faculty
expressed its appreciation of the spir-
it of the senior class and stated that
it was glad to meet it halfway.
Prof. Thieme lectures in Vicksburg
Prof. Hugo P. Thieme, of the French
department, is in Vicksburg today.
He will deliver a lecture in that town
on "Millet, the Artist," and will re-
turn tomorrow.

exclusive use of Army and Navy of-
fieials, and are being released for the
first time.
German Book Included
The national advisory council for
aeronautics supplied a copy of the
"Technische Berickte," a three volume
edition in the'original German. This
book was issued by the German gov-
ernment during the war and was sur-
rendered to the American government
in concurrence with conditions of the
LEWI S TO TALK O N
FOREIGN AFFAIRS
Will Deliver Sixth Lecture on Pro.
gram of Oratorical Association
Friday Night

tigation, and explain in detail the con-
struction and operation 'of German
aircraft. A copy of an English trans-
lation of the book, which is now be-
ing made, will be sent to the library.
Volumes Are Technical
The other works contain informa-
tion of aeronautics, motor construc-
tion, carburetors, fuels, and materials
of airplane construction. They in-
clude the bulletin of the experimental'
department, airplane engineering di-
vision, U. S. Army; various technical
notes and training manuals of the
Army air service; British air force
technical notes; air service informa-
tion circulars; navy aircraft technical
notes; five volume edition, annual re-
ports of the national advisory council
for aeronautics; and numerous indi-
vidual reports on aeronautical sub-
jects.
DEPATMENTS AT ODDS
CONCERNING OCLLAGHN

JANE MANNERS SECURED FOR
VACANCY OF LELAND POWERS
"Our Foreign Relations - Yester-
day and Tomorrow" is the subject of
James Hamilton Lewis, who will de-
liver the sixth of the series of lec-
tures, given under the auspices of the
Oratorical association, at 8 o'clock
Friday, Jan. 14, in Hill auditorium.
Has Long Record
Mr. Lewis is said to be an authority
on the subject of foreign affairs, hav-
ing served on important foreign rela-
tions commissions in both the house
and the senate. While a member of
the Fifty-fifth congress, Lewis intro-
duced the resolution recognizing the
independence of Cuba. Later he serv-
ed on the staff of Gen. F. D. Grant in
the Spanish-American war. He was
then appointed to the commission on
Canadian and Alaskan boundaries, as
well as serving on the commission
regulating the custom laws between
Canada and the Northwest.
Lewis was elected to the senate
from the state of Illinois, where he
represented the United States at Lon-
don in the drawing up of a maritime
treaty. During his political career he}
was twice proposed for vice-presi-
dent.
Declared Forceful Speaker
As a speaker critics declare the
ex-senator to be forceful, being noted
for his humor and mastery of ora-!
torical style. Demonstrating his
knowledge of elections and interna-
tional affairs, Mr. Lewis has written
the following books, "Statutes and
Their Construction," "Two Great Re-
publics, Rome and the United States,"
and a history of international law.
The oratorical board wishes to an-
nounce the filling of the date of Feb.
24 left open by Leland -Powers with
Jane Manners.
Sarg 's Puppets
Here Tomorrow
"Rip Van Winkle," Washington Irv-
ing's old American folk legend so typic-
al of our early Dutch settlers, will be
played at 3:30 o'clock tomorrow aft-
ernoon in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
by Tony Sarg's puppets.
In the evening at 8 o'clock "Olla1
Podrida," a bill of variety acts and
playlets, will be given. This perform-
ance features a clown, a Miss Lucy
who sings, Indian snake charmers, an
oriental dancer, and a blue ribbon'
puppet puppy.
"The merriment of the audience over
peppet's movements almost drowned
the voices of the actors who talked for
the dolls behind the scenes," is what
the New York Evening Mail said of
the marionettes' performance.

PASSPORT
NOT BE

RESTRICTIONS WILL
WAIVED TO PERMIT

ENTRANCE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 10.-Passport re-
strictions will not be waived by the
state department to permit entrance to
the United States of Daniel J. O'Cai-
laghan, lord mayor of Cork, who on,
his arrival last week at Newport
News, as a stowaway and without a
passport, was temporarily admitted on
parole by order of the labor depart-
ment.
The state department's decision an-
nounced today by acting Secretary
Davis brought forth the assertion by
labor department officials that juris-
diction in the case rested exclusively
with the secretary of labor.
This indicated a continuation of the
controversy betwen the two depart-
ments which has been more or less ap-
parent ever since the landing of the
Cork lord mayor on American soil.
String Quartet
Impresses Large
Crowd Nonday
The Flonzaley string quartet, per-
haps the greatest organization of its
kind in existence, gave a concert last
night in Hill auditorium before an
appreciative audience. The numbers
played brought out the thoroughness
characteristic of this group of men.
Beethoven's "Quartet in F major,
opus 59, No. 1," was the first number
played. All four movements of this
work were done with a distinctness in
the individual voices. The adagio mol-
to mesto with its slow picturesque
cadence and the allegro movement
which fillowed it brought forth con-
tinue,. applause from the audience.
The second division of the program,
"Quartet in A major, opius 41, No. 3,"
by Schumann, although rather long,
held the interest to the end with the
varying shades of color in the har-
monies of the work.,
In conclusion and in contrast to the
heavier music of Schumann came
Goosen's "By the Tarn," and Graing-
er's "Molly on the Shore." The first'
was played in such a way as to em-
phasize its close harmony. The
Grainger composition roused the list-
ener to enthusiasm, to the enthusiasm
of this red blooded Australian com-
poser.
Faculty Votes to Regulate Clocks
The faculty voted to regulate the
tower clock and other regulated clocks
of the University, as a lac.k of confi-

POOR SHOWING OF MAIZE AND
BLUE FORWARDS LOSES
CONTEST
MARXSON AND DEAN OF
HOOSIERS,STAR PLAYERS
Varsity Loses Teamplay in Second
Half and Visitors Score
Heavily
Brilliant basket shooting by Marx-
son, of Indiana, and poor showing of
the Michigan forwards in that depart-
ment of the game, cost the Maize and
Blue its second Conference contest,
the Hoosies winning 30 to 21, in Wat-
erman gymnasium, Monday night.
The play for the first seven minutes
was remarkably even, Michigan oppos-
ing the fast five man defense of the
visitors by covering each player in-
dividually. Indiana secured an eighth
pohit lead before Whitlock scored the
first Michigan point from the foul line.
Whitlock also made the first Michigan
field basket, on a long corner shot at
the end of the first 15 minutes of play.
Game Played Fast
The entire game was decidedly fast,
and the passing of both teams cor-
respondingly inaccurate. In the last
five minutes of the first period, and
for the same length of time in the sec-
ond half, Michigan was superior in
every way to the Hoosiers, securing
more than half of the total 21 points.
At the opening of the second half the
Wolverine defense was much strong-
er, and for a time the basket shooting
was good, especially on the part of
Miller, who slipped in two long shots.
Michigan then seemed to lose heart,
and the team dropped apart, with only
the Michigan guards holding down the
opposing total.
Close Guarding Helps Varsity
Marxson and Dean stood out by their
brilliant playing, the former sinking
several sensational shots. Rea and
Williams covered the Indiana forwards
well, the former playing a good game
both offensively and defensively. He
missed many long shots by the nar-
rowest of margins. Michigan seemed
to be unable to play as a team, and
the lask of passing, coupled with in-
ability to score, gave the game to the
visiting quintet.
Michigan . Pos. IndianaI
Whitlock ......L.F.Marxson, Schuler,
Marxson
Miller, Karpus.R.F.......Dehofity
Weiss .......... C .... . ... Dean, capt.
Rea ...........L.G..........Thomas1
Williams.......R.G. Dobbins, MaynardI
Final score, Indiana 30, Michigan 21,1
first half, Indiana 14, Michigan 8. 1
Summary, field baskets - Marxson1
6, Dehority 3, Dean, Thomas, Schuler;
Whitlock 4, Miller 2, Weiss, Williams.
Goals from foul - Dean 6-8; Whit-1
lock 1-4, Weiss 1-5, Karpus 3-3. Rer-i
eree--Peckinpaugh. Umpire-McCul-
lough.c
FALL FROM HORSE '
FATAL TO NURSE
Leona Lake, a senior in the Homoeo-E
pathic Nurses' Training school, died
at 12:45 o'clock Sunday noon as the1
result of the injuries she incurred in
a fall while horseback riding.
Accompanied by her brother, Oscar
Lake, '24E, and Alis Hendrickson, a
freshman nurse, Miss Lake went for
her first ride Sunday morning. They
were on the road in the vicinity of
the Barton Hills Country club when
the accident occurred. She seemed to
be riding well, according to her broth-

er, until the horse became disturbed
and broke into a gallop. She threw
her arms about the animal's neck in
an attempt to steady herself but was
pitched to the ground. A basal frac-
ture of the skull sustained from the
fall, caused her death 45 minutes lat-
er.
The body was taken to her home in
Benton Harbor last night. Vivian
Thorpe, representing the training
school, and Marjorie Otto of the sen-
ior class, accompanied Oscar Lake to
Benton Harbor with the remains. Thee
funeral services will be held this aft-
ernoon.

REGENTS APPOINT
TO SCHOLARSHIPS
Appointment of Winifred Smeaton
'24, Lucilla Walker, '24, and Mary J.
Loughin, '24, to the Phillip classical
scholarships for the year 1920-1921
was made at the meeting of the Board
of Regents Friday afternoon. The
three students were recommended by
the committee in charge of the exam-
inations for the scholarships, consist-
ing of President Marion L. Burton,
Dean John R. Effinger, Prof. H. A.
Sanders, of the Latin department, and
Prof. Campbell Bonner, of the Greek
department.
The scholarships which were pro-
vided in the will of the late Henry
Phillips, of Philadelphia, are given
each year to the candidates for the
degree of bachelor of arts who excell
in the Greek and Latin studies requir-
ed for admission to the University.l
EMPLOYEES CHARGE
RAIL CONSICY
Debtle Railroads Are Defrauding
People of Millions Through
Cost-Plus System
JEWELL SAYS UNDER CUMMINS
ACT HIGHER COSTS UNLAWFUL
Chicago, Jan. 10. - Charges that
American railroads are in a conspir-
acy to create non-employment and
are defrauding the American people
of millions through operation of a
cost-plus system of contracts with
equipment and repair companies were
made today by representatievs of em-
ployes of the roads appearing before
the railroad labor board. The railroad
operators presented counter testi-
mony.
Morgan Interests Own 80 Per Cent
The employes' charges which de-
clared that 80 per cent of the railroads
in the country were controled by the
Morgan steel interests asserted that
maintenance cost had been inflated at
the expense of the public. This was
don'e, according to the statement of
B. M. Jewell, head of the railway em-
ployes department of the American
Federation of Labor, by letting con-
tracts to equipment companies, "con-
trolled by the same banks that con-I
trol the railroads."
Constitute a Fraud
"Under the guarantee of the Esch-
Cummins act, the alleged inflated
costs constitute a fraud against the
United States government and operat-
ed to throw out of employment more
than 50,000 steel railway employes,"
Mr. Jewell said.
Declaring that the charges had no
relevancy to the hearing on rules and
working conditions under considera-
tion by the board, E. T. Whiter, chair-
man of the managers' committee of
the railroads, asserted that they were
made "to divert public attention from
the matters in controversy."
Present Agreement Unfit
Examples designed to show inequal-
ities in the present rules were recited
in detail by Mr. Whiter. He declared
that the present national agreement
could not, in the interest of honest,
efficient, and economical manage-
ment, be continued longer and said
universal application of their provi-
sions was impracticable, because the
only parties fully qualified to consid-
er such regulations were the individ-
ual managements and the employes
themselves.

Alumni Plan to Raise Sum
$43,000 to Aid Asso.
ciation

of

DRIVE PLANS FOR
SECUR. GIVEN TO
e150 CANVASSERS

Completing preparations for the
Students Christian association drive
for $5,000, which begins today, 150
men from 20 canvassing teams, met
at Lane hall last night, where they
were instilled with pep by Fred Law-
ton, '11, and given complete informa-
tion and instructions concerning the
details of the campaign. Lists of the
students each man is to see were giv-
en out and the number of days for
canvassing were announced.
The campaign will be continued for
four days, ending Friday night. As
plans are now, the first three days
will be devoted to reaching every man
on the ,campus by the solicitor to
whom his name has been assigned and
the last day to geenral solicitation
by the members of the teamsto reach
any who have been omitted, or have
changed their minds regarding a con-
tribution.
$5,000 Is Yearly Budget
Emphasis was laid at the meeting
on the fact that the alumni were rais-
ing $43,000 for the lifting of the debt
on the S. C. A., while the student body
has only been asked for $5,000, the
budget for current expenses for this
year. It was also pointed out that the
success of the alumni drive would
materially depend on the success of
the campaign here, and that if the
student body can put the drive here
over with a good showing, the whole
of the amount promised by the alumni
organizations would be raised with
ease. The organizations of Detroit,
Chicago, New York and other large
centers are already beginning the
campaigns in their cities for their
part of the S. C. A. debt.
Names of the captains of teams
were announced as follows: Norman
Buchan, '22, E. E. Weiman, '21, G. L.
Wessinger, '21E, L. J. Hershdorfer,
'23, B. C. Fairman, '21, R. E. Adams,
'23, J. A. Stewart, '21, J. J. Hamel,
'23, A. R. Fox. '23, Ramon Capistra-
no, grad., F. H. Lee, '22, B. E. Dun-
lop, '23, S. R. Boyer, '22, E. P. Love-
joy, '22E, R. P. Dillon, '21E A. F.
King, '21E, G. N. Johnston, '21E, 0.
C. Michelmann, '22, R. W. Kneebone,
'21, D. J. Thorpe, '21, W. G. Drae-
well, '22.
Baxter Gives Talk
At the meeting a few details of the
work of the S. C. A. were enlarged
upon and explained by C. Stewart
Baxter, '21, president of the S. C. A.,
so the men would have a more inti-
mate knowledge of the organization,
and its departments. They were ex-
plained in the order of their appear-
ance in-the booklet sent to every Uni-
versity man yesterday, explaining the
drive and the needs of. the S. C. A.
Donald Porter, '21, chairman of the
drive, opened the meeting with ex-
planations of the details of the cam-
paign.
Maintenance of Lane hall headed
the list for expenditures in the bud-
get, being set at $2,500. The hospi-
tality and social service of the work-
ers there was dwelt upon and the op-
portunities for student recreation
mentioned. Printing of the freshman
hand book is the next most expensive.
item of the budget, costing $800. The
(Continued on page Eight
SERVICE MEN TO OPPOSE NON
PARTISAN LEAGUE IN KANSAS
Salina, Kan., Jan. 10.-Nearly 500
former service men representing ci-
ties in every section of Kansas met
here today to perfect organized ef-
forts resisting the Non - partisan
league organizers who are establish-
ing the league as a political weapon
in the hands of farmers and laboring

men of the state. At the same time
r 1,500 farmers met in another hall to
listen to Non-partisan league speak-
ers. Both meetings were quiet.

FRED

FOUR DAY CAMPAIGN TO
CLOSE FRIDAY NIGHT

LAWTON, '11, SPEAKS TO

MEMBERS OF TWENTY
TEAMS

Tryouts Wanted
For Comedy Club
Annual tryouts for the Comedy club
will be held from 9 to 11 o'clock Sat-
urday morning, Jan. 18, in University
hall, according to Albert C. Jacobs,
'21, president.
There are a number of vacancies in!
the club and students interested in
obtaining membership should take ad-
vantage of this tryout, according to
Jacobs. Any student in the University
is eligible. Persons interested are ad-
vised to prepare some short selection
to read, otherwise the committee will
give them something to read.
Meetings of the Comedy club are
held onec a month at which time the
members give short plays. Jacobs
stated that the work is beneficial to
those interested in dramatics and gives
a great deal of experience in acting.

MICHIGANENSIAN NOTICE

Bills for organizations

and

Kansas Club to Elect Officers Today dence in them was expressed.
Formulation of plans for the ob-
servance of Kans.s day and election Mortarboard to Entertain Seniors
of officers will be the business for the Mortarboard will entertain all sen-
Kansas club to consider at its meet- ior women at a tea dance from 3:30
ing at 4 o'clock today in the Natural to 5:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon
Science auditorium. at Helen Newberry residence.

fraternities are past due and
must be paid at'once.
f'

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