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January 09, 1921 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-09

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS A
DIAY AND NIGIT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 7. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 9, 1921. PRICE FIVE CEN

I I

MEETING MONDAY
WILL SEE FINISH
OF DRIVE PLANS

ALL SOLICITORS WILL MEET
LANE HALL MONDAY FOR
INSTRUCTIONS

IN

S.C.A. FUND CAMPAIGN
WILL INCLUDE ALUMNI
Campus Objective Is Set at $5,000;
$15,000 Will Be Sought from
Alumni
Final preparations for the Students
Christian association drive for $5,000
among the student body will be com-
pleted tomorrow night at a meeting
of all the canvassing teams and theirb
captains at Lane hall. The time haso
been set at 9 o'clock so that it will1
not interfere with the Michigan-In-r
diana basketball game. '
Simultaneously with the beginning
of the campaign on the campus, the
campaign among the alumni for $43,-
567.88, the debt now owed by the S.-
C. A., will begin. Final preparationsl
for the drive among the Detroit alum-
ni were made at a luncheon yesterdayt
noon at which prominent Detroitc
graduates and several of the S. C. A.t
men from Ann Arbor spoke.r
Fred Lawton Will Speak I
Fred Lawton, '11, best known as the
pep meeting speaker, will be at the
meeting Monday night to tell about
the way the alumni look at the cam-
paign. Complete instructions will be
given the teams at that time and the
vital needs of the S. C. A. explained
in full, while Donald Porter, '20,
chairman of the drive, C. StewartI
Baxter, '20, president of the S. C. A.,
and Lane hall officials will help in
putting the idea of the campaign1
across to the men.
Want $15,000 from Alumni t
Personal solicitations and circular1
letters will be used among the grad-1
uates and other Detroit men interest-1
ed in the University for obtaining
$15,000, the whole of the amount de-F
sired. Harry Carey, '20, manang
editor of The Daily last year, is in
charge of the campaign among thes
younger alumni, and Thad E. Leland,
'96, is chairman of the whole Detroit
committee.
Both these men spoke at the meet-
ing Saturday and also William M.-
Mertz, '96, and Carl Johnsop, '20.
From Ann Arbor, T. M. Iden of the
Upper Room Bible class, T. S. Evans,1
secretary of Lane hll, Paul W. Ea-
ton, '21, president of the Union, C.
Stewart Baxter, '21, Louis Reimann,
11f, secretary of the Extension serv-
ice, LGrand A. Gaines, '21, president
of the Student council, Fred J. Petty,
'21, representing the senior class and
the undergraduate body as a whole,
and Donald J. Porter, '21, attended
the meeting and each spoke of the S.
0. A., its needs and its work from the
point of View of the organizations they
.epresented.
Booklet Issued
The. student body will receive its
first official notice of the drive for
funds in the shape of a booklet issued
by the S. C. A., which will reach
every, man on the campus Monday.
Contained in the booklet are brief ex-
planations of the needs of the organi-
zation, the budget complete, and a
short statement by President Marion
L Burton containing a definition of
religio.
NOTICE! ALL SENIORS
Due to labor conditions affect-
igo pir engravers and printers
efinal date for taking of Sen-
ipr pictures for the Michigan-

esian I JANUARY 22. Ar-
range for sittings immediately.
Saturday, January 22 is the finai
date. Don't wait until the last
few days.

SUBSCRIPTION FOR
P O O L NOW $9,916
Additional subscriptions to the
Union swimming pool fund have in-
creased the total to $9,916. Many of
the donations are being received di-
rect from the donors, each mail for'
the past few days having contained a
few checks for the fund. All solicit-
ors who have not as yet reported are
requested to do so immediately. Re-
ports will be received at the lobby
desk or in the business office.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE;
PLANSLARE BAOUET
PROMINENT BUSINESS MEN AND
PROFESSORS ON PROGRAM
FOR DINNER
The committee in charge of the
banquet to be given by the Chamber
of Commerce at its next meeting, Jan.
17, met last night and completed ar-
rangements for the evening. Prof. F.
N. Menefee, of the engineering col-
lege, is chairman of the committee.
William Smith Will Talk
William Smith, of Lansing, chair-
man of the state public utilities com-
mission, has been secured as the.
principal speaker of the evening.
Martin J. Cavenaugh will be the
toastmaster. Mr. Allshouse, formerly
of the state insurance department,
will tell the business men of Ann Ar-
bor how they can save insurance
money by increased fire protection.
Dr. S. R. Guilde, of the medical fac-
ulty. will speak upon the importance
of better housing conditions. An add-
ed feature will be a short minstrel
given by Edwin Martin, '23, and Don
Weiman, '24, brother of Tad Weiman,
the football star.
Will BegIn at 6:30
Harry Gillen, Paul Korzuck, and
Sidney Millard will be in general
charge of the banquet arrangements.
Dr. Warren Forsythe, of the Univer-
sity Health service, will be in charge
of the ticket sale on the campus and
Harry Gillen and Chris Donnelly will
supervise the sale of tickets in the
town. Singing will be led by Mr.
Bowen, superintendent of music in the
public schools, while Fred 'Gosse will
be in charge of the musical program.
The banquet will begin promptly at
6:30 o'clock.
Skater 's Courses
Start Next Week
New classes in stage dancing, play
writing and acting will be formed
next week by E. Mortimer Shuter, di-
rector of the Union opera. The work
to be taken up will be the same as
has been done by students who have
been carrying the courses since last
fall.
The latter group of men will
henceforth carry more advanced
work of the same nature. In order to
accommodate a number who now wish
to enter the classes, it was deemed
advisable to form new classes in or-
der not to retard those who have been
studying the technique of play writ-
ing and acting, and stage dancing,
Further, the beginners will receive a
better foundation by commencing all
together at the beginning of the
courses.
Those who wish to take the work
are asked to see Mr. Shuter at his of-_

fice in. the musical activities room of
the Union at once. He is giving the
courses upon his own initiative. Class
work begins next week.
OI LAHOMA UNIVERSITY ASKS
$2,000,000 FOR NEW BUILDINGS
The University of Oklahoma is ask-
ing the state legislature for a budget
of $2,000,000 to build new buildings
necessitated by the large increase in
students. The Oklahoma Daily, the
student newspaper of that institution;
defends editorially the proposed
grant by a comparison to the much
larger sum asked by the University of
Michigan. "It, the University of Mich
igan, is asking $1,500,000 for engi
neering shops and laboratories, while
the engineering college already
has as many buildings as the entire
plant of the University of Oklahoma
Nine hundred thousand dollars are
being asked for a general building
I for the literary college."

ANARCHYCOMING
IN INDIA CLAIM~
Sir Michael O'Dwyer Believes Emipire
To Be Fast Approaching Ruin
and Rebellion
SAYS REVOLUTION LEADERS
SHOULD BE IMPRISONED NOW
(By Associated Press)
London, Jan. 8. - Sir Michael
O'Dwyer, until recently governor of
the important province of Punjab in
India, in an article in the Globe today
concerning the serious unrest in In-
dia which has taken the form of gov-
ernment boycotts, strikes and sedi-
tious utterances, declares that the
present extremist movement is head-
ing "straight for the disorganization
of trade and commerce, or the ruin
of every interest in India, and for
anarchy and rebellion."
Sir Michael asserts that "the time
for toying with sedition in this vast
em'pire has long since passed," and
that if Engl-and were to retain India
the law must be rigorously and im
partially enforced, irrespective of
persons, caste or class.
"All those who are heading the rev-
olutionary conspiracies, Gandhi, the
Ali brothers and Sagpt Rdi and oth-
ers equally notorious 1nd equally hos-
tile to British rule should be dealt
with under the law before it is too
late," Sir Michael concluded.
SEPARTE ACHITECTURE
DEPARTENT FAVORED
PRESIDENT BURTON AND LORCII
ENDORSE IDEA OF SEP-
ARATION
Commenting upon the resolution
adopted by the Reegnts at their meet-
ing Friday, concerning a separate
College of Architecture, President
Marion L. Burton stated that he was
thoroughly in sympathy with the
idea.
"I am not sure how soon this proj-
ect will be realized or what form it
will take," was the statement of
President Burton. "It may or may
not be a combined building of all the
Arts courses. However, the need for
some sort of an individual housing
for the architectural college is one
which I have long realized."
When asked to give his views of
the possibilities suggested by te res-
olution, Prof. Emil Lorch, head of
the College of Architecture, said:
"The architecture faculty has been
striving for years for a separate
school for architecture. State arch-
itects, alumni architects of this col-
lege, as well as many prominent citi-
zens have been urging this step for
years.
"A profession of an established
standing like that of architecture
should be strong enough to stand on
its own feet. In 1914 the National
Institution of Architecture passed a
resolution asking that all architectur-
al schools be made Independent.
Schols training men for a profession
should follow the lines laid out by the
official organization of that profes-
sion.
"The College of Architecture of the
University of Michigan is a member of
the Association of Collegiate Schools
of Architecture, most of which are in-
dependent schools. Michigan has one

of the large Architectural schools of
the country and has a recognized
standing with the American Institute
of Architects. Her graduates are do-
ing well as practitioners.
Professor Lorch, in expressing his
opinion as to the advisability of erect-
ing a separate building for Architec-
ture or combining it with Fine Arts
t stated, "It is a problem ,about which
the profession is divided. Columbia
Harvard and Cornell have separate
schools, while Syracuse, Pennsylva-
nia, and Yale have architecture in
: buildings part of which are devoted
to Fine Arts."
.
- Rehmus Will Address Banquet
- Paul Rehmus, '23, will speak ats
e "glad hand" banquet of high schoo
Y boys to be held Monday, Jan. 10, a
e Jackson. Rehmus was elected presi
. dent of the State Older Boys' Con
e ference in 1918. He is working un
g der the auspices of the Extesim
service of the S. C. A

TONY SARG'S MARIONETTES, SAID TO BE
BEST OF PUPPETS, WILL APPEAR HERE

Tony Sarg's marionettes will give
two performances here on Wednes-
day, Jan. 12, in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall under the auspices of the
Ann Arbor alumni of Smith and Wel-
lesley colleges.
Tony Sarg, successful illustrator of
humor both in America and Eng-
land, has for many years been per-
fecting his marionettes until today
they are said by many critics to stand
HARING FAVORS
INCESDNAVY'
Conferenee with Rep. Butler Shows
Approval of Large Program
of Construction
MATERIAL CURTAILMENT OF
CIVILIAN WORKERS ENDORSED
(By Associated Press)
Marion, Ohio, Jan. 8.-A naval pol-
icy to keep the United States one of
the strongest sea powers in the world
until a lasting disarmament agree-
ment has been reached was suggested
in a conference today between presi-
dent-elect Harding and Representa-
tive Butler, of Pennsylvania, chairman
of the house naval committee. After-
ward.s it was intimated that although
a 'anal decision must await develop-
ruent the present attitude of Senator
Harding pointed to a continuance dur-
ing his administration of the fleet con-
struction program now in congress.
Coupled with this program would be
a material curtailment of the number
of civilian employes of the naval de-
partment and various economics in
the land stations under navy jurisdic-
tion. Mr. Harding long has favored
an efficient navy as the first line of
American defense and he is understood
to feel that a big naval policy must
be continued practically except for
taking steps to curtail the strength of
the army along the line he approved
yesterday in a conference with Repre-
sentative Kahn, chairman of the house
military committee.
DANCES MUST HAVE
OFFICIAL P E R M I T S
Notice is given through the Daily
Official Bulletin this morning that any
student organization wishing to give
a dance, house-party, or social enter-
tainment of any kind, in Ann Arbor
or elsewhere, must secure permission
of the committee on student affairs
of the University Senate council.
This action was taken, according to
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, chairman of
the committee, in o der to prvent
further violations of tLr'ings of the
council in regard to suc c -ents. In
the past students have broken the
rules through. failure to b come ac-
quainted with them, and tl-s present
measure is intended primarily as a
means to familiarize with t.( ,rules
students who expect to give ,cial en-
tertainments in future, Professor
Strauss stated. Failure to observe
the order will render the offending or-
ganizatiqn liable to discipline.
BASKETBALL TICKETS ALL
DISPOSED OF YESTERDAY
The last 300 tickets for the Wiscon-
sin game were disposed of shortly aft-

er the Athletic association office open-
ed yesterday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock
Many students took advantage of the
opportunity to secure the two extra
Conference game tickets, but as ther
were more applicants than seats only
those who came early were able to
' secure any.
There are a few Ohio-Purdue ticket
left, but it is not expected that thesE
will be obtainable as "extras," fo:
many students have not secured thei
entitled two-game cardboards at the
present time.

as the most perfect examples of their
kind. They will be sen in "Rip Van
Winkle" and "Olla Podrida,"a puppet
vaudeville performance.
A. M. Jungman, in an article in the
Popular Science Monthly, writes:
"There is no' telling what may de-
velop from the hobby of a collector.
The most lifelike puppets that ever
graced a miniature stage came into
being just because an artist had a
hobby of collecting toys."
The marionettes were received in
New York with enthusiasm. They
have played to packed houses in two
Broadway theaters. It is said that
these puppets gave the jaded theater
goers of New York and Boston a new
sensation.
FLONZALEY OUARTET TO
PLAY HERETOMORROW
FAMOUS MUSICIANS ARE WELL
KNOWN IN EUROPE AND
AMERICA
The Flonzaley String Quartet, a
group of musicians whose work is
well known in Europe and America,
will render one of its characteristic
programs tomorrow evening at 8
o'clock in Hill auditorium.
Adolfo Betti, an Italian violin vir-
tuoso, is the first violinist in the quar-
tet. The other members of the or-
ganization are Alfred Pochon, second
violin, Louis Bailly, viola, and Iwan
d'Archambeau, cello.
The program which they will give
is as follows:
Quartet in F major, Opus 50,
No. 1 ................ Beethoven
Allegro
Allegretto vivace e sempre
scherzanio
Adagio molto e mesto-Allegro
(Theme Russe)
Quartet in A major, opus 41,
No. 3..............Schumann
Andante espressivo - Allegro
molto moderato
Assai agitato
Adagio molto
Allegro assai vivace
"By the Tarn"...........Goossens
"Molly on the Shore"...... Grainger
Seniors Combine
For New Smoker
Marking a new development in cam-
pus social events, the senior classes
of the literary and engineering col-
leges will hold a smoker together at
7:30 o'clock next Thursday, Jan. 13,
in the Union assembly hall. The pur-
pose of the occasion will be to
strengthen acquaintanceships between
the two classes, as heretofore the prac-
tice has been for the various depart-
ments to give social events independ-
ently until commencement time.
President Marion L. Burton, Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley, and Dean John
R. Effinger have been secured to speak,
and George Rogers' orchestra will
play. Pierce McLouth, '21, and Cal-
vin G. Wetzel, '21E, are in charge. Ad-
mission tags will sold on the campus
Monday.
ROOMING CHANGES MUST BE
REFERRED TO COMMITTEE
Notice has been given by Maior
Bursley, chairman of the housing
committee, that students desiring to
change their rooming places at the
end of the semester must consult the
- committee of appeal of the University

lHousing bureau before Feb. 1.
e At the beginning of the school yea
3 President Marion L. Burton declare
e that the student's rooming contrac
Y would be binding for both semester
D unless other agreeemnts were made
In order that students might presen
s their reasons for securing new loca
e tions the housing committee has ar
r ranged to meet them every Mondal
r afternoon from 3 to 5 o'clock in th
e Union.

M ICHIGA9N BETEN
BY WISCONSlN TO
REA AND WILLIAMS HAVE TO
LEAVE FLOOR AND TIDE
TURNS
DEFEAT DUE MOSTLY TO
MANY PERSONAL FOULS
Captain Taylor Stars for VsJtors;
Williams, Whitlock, and Karpus
Shine
Personal fouls played a large part in
Michigan's defeat, 27 to 24, at the
hands of Wisconsin in the first Con-
ference basketball game of the season
last night in Waterman gymnasium.
Michigan led the visitors until the lat-
ter part of the second half when both
Rea and Williams had to leave the
floor on account of an excessive num-
ber of personal fouls, the resulting
lack of teamwork being responsible i
great measure for the Wisconsin
points in the last few minutes.
Taylor Stars for Wisconsin
Captain Taylor, right forward on th
Wisconsin five, was the ndividual stai
of the contest. He made 19 of the
Badger points, seven of them by the
foul route. His shots from the fooi
were phenomenally accurate and he
seemed able to shoot instantly from
any position. Williams was the bright
est light for the Wolverines, with Cap
tain Karpus and Whitlock also star
ring. Williams was a stonewall on th
defense and, following the play at al
times and . guarding closely. Whit
lock scored three pretty baskets an
distinguished himself by being the
only man to play ,the whole contes
without fouling. Karpus displayed hi
usual speed on the floor and accurac:
in passing and shooting. From the fou
line he made the remarkable record o
10 baskets in 13 attempts.
Game Lost in Second Half
The Michigan quintet -outplaye
their opponents considerablly the firs
half, the count being 15 to 9 at it
close. Karpus did not miss a shot fror
the foul line in seven attempts dunrin
this period. The Wisconsin team cam
back with a rush in the second hal
and were not long in bringing tim
score to a tie. For a few minutes th
game seemed to hang in the balahce
and then, with the loss of William
and Rea to aid them, the Badger
forged ahead.
The line-ups were as follows:
Karpus (capt.) L.F......R. William
Whitlock ......R.F. ... Taylor (capt.
Weiss ......... C............ Frogne
Williams ...... L.G......... ...Caesa
Rea .......... R.G..........Tebe
Final score-Wisconsin 2,7, Mich:
gan 24. Score at end pf fist half-
Wisconsin 9, Michigan 15. Goals froi
field-Whitlock 3, Karpus 2, Weiss:
Williams 1, Taylor 9, R. Williams:
Frogner 1, Caesar 2. Goals fro
foul-Karpus 10 in 13, Taylor 7 in 1
Substitutions: Michigan-Wilson fc
. Rea, Rouse for Williams, Peare f
Rouse. Wisconsin Horne for Te
bell, J. Williams for Horne. Referee-
Hedges (Dartmouth). Umpire--MI
Cullough (Springfield Y. M. C. A.).
N. Y. LAWMAKERS TO TAKE
ACTION TO END CRIME WAV

New York, Jan. 8.-Legislators :
this state served notice during Ne
York's crime wave that at the ne:
e session they intend introducing mea
- ures to provide greater punishme:
for highwaymen and l urglars.
r With daring robberies becomin
e very day occurences, the cour
s here quickly decided to mete out ma
. imum punishment wherever possit
It and raised bail to insure keepin
criminals behind bars.
A study of existing laws in va:
ous states shows that in three bur
e lary is punishable by death and
e four, robbery - should the maximm
punishment be applied.

_ ls'Lt op' .Te __te _to _ 'live.._r linilJd _ l __tu .e

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j Bishop Leete to Deliver Guild Lecture
Col. Murphy Will Inspect R.. OR T. C. Bishop F. D. Leete, of Indianapolis,
Col. J. B. Murphy, of Washington, will deliver a Wesleyan Guild lecture
D. C., will arrive in Ann Arbor Mon- at 7:30 o'clock this evening at the
day morning to inspect the local con- Methodist Episcopal church on "The
tingent of ihe R. O. T. C. Col. Murphy Future of America." Bishop Leete is
is situated in the office of the Chief the author of many works on the sub-
of Coast Artillery at Washington. ject of religious education.

i
,.

MICHIGANENSIAN NOTICE
Bills for organizations and
fraternities are past due and
must be paid at once.

THE WEATHER
Fair and Cooler; Fresh West and
and Northwest Winds.

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