100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1920 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCTO

OPPORTUNITIES OFFERED"r
BY CAMPUS ACTIITIES
(Continued from Page One)
bus interest, and short stories. The
Gargoyle can always use good humor
writers.
Important Work
At the beginning of the year a small
group' of students take upon them-
selves the task of putting out the Stu-
dent Directory. This is one of the
biggest tasks of the year, and must
be done in a co gparatively short timd
There is an excellent opportunity for
service on the Directory staff.
The Michiganensian, the official
year book, has on its staff, room for
writers, artists, photographers, and
men and women willing to do little
odd jobs, which, while not so pleas-
ant, must be done. Any campus ac-
tivity will start its workers off in the
less important positions, until they

can be placed where they will be most
effective.
The Michigan Daily is a strictly
student publication, and on its staff,
uses newswriters, experienced and
inexperienced, editorial writers, and
any who aspire to such positions. The
business side of all these publications
gives opportunity to all who prefer
that type of work to the editorial type.
Ad selling, copy chasing, publication
and account work are all among the
fields open.
Serve Michigan
The opportunity to serve Michigan
should be enough to make every man
in the University eager to be engaged
in student activities. The friendships.
formed 'during the work prove to bel
among the strongest made in college,
and the feeling that one is always:
working toward some goal is an add-
ed incentive. There is a place on the
campus for every Michigan man. The
activities cannot come to you; you
must go to them. It is your oppor-
tunity for service.

t
,

Why are you so Insistent

YEAROLINGS MUST LEARN
MICHI6AN__TRADITIONS
(Continued from Page One)
Clean and good sportsmanship have
always been cardinal points for Mich-
igan men, but at times a few of the
riff raff have'tended to shadow this
tradition. Jeering at referees, hoot-
ing opposing players, and crabbing at
the home team's defeat are not char-
acteristic of men of this University,
Rather is it the spirit of Michigan to
: take wrong decisions calmly, to ex-
tend every consideration to a rival
player, and to greet him warmly after
victory, and to support his own team,
whether there is hope for ultimate
victory or not. Square treatment of
everyone comes under sportsmanship,
and no Michigan man has right to
find fault with his University, unless
he is doing his level best to improve
it. Everlasting support of all our ac-
tivities is the duty of every man here
who expects to be a Michigan man.
Michigan Spirit, that tie which
binds all students and alumni of this
University together, and which is
known the country over as this Uni-
versity's characteristic, is practically
undefinable. Only through residence
here, close association and constant
meeting of men, and participation in
its activities can one fully appreciate
the full significance of Michigan
Spirit. Few are the men, who have
come here, that have not been gripped
by this spirit, and who in after years
have not found themselves on com-
mon ground with strangers, whom
they discover are Michigan graduates.
So powerful is this Spirit that the
( alumni come back to see the Univer- I
sity years after graduation, and they
give hours of their time and much of
their money to furthering Michigan
interests.
Michigan Spirit calls for all men to
take part in the school's activities.
Through men meeting men and mix-
ing with each other, this Spirit comes
to be, and it is a spirit which calls for
every Michigan man to give his best
for victory and a greater University.
Thees three traditions, Scholarship,
Sportsmanship, and Spirit, are ones
which every freshman should uphold.

Beca

I

IMr. Besimer's Beefsteak

DUKE UNE NAWITES
TRIP OF OLYMPIC STAS
(Continued from Page One)
We finally shoved off from the dock
and startea down the Hudson, passingI
the Statue of Liberty and then putting
directly out to sea. The days that
followed were long and not altogether
pleasant. Many a meal went uneaten;
nor was the cause seasickness or lack
of appetite. One night Carl Johnson,
who was bunking next to me, sug-
gested carrying our bedding up on
deck where the air would be better
and we would not be disturbed, by
rats. From then on we followed this
suggestion-not only we, but many
from the different holds.
Our training consisted of setting up
exercises and running around the
decks. There was a cork-floored
straightaway for the dash men, while
the weight men put the shot into a
large coil of rope. Long ropes were
tied to the javelins, so that when the
throwers 'practiced it looked like a
fish spearing contest. The boxers put
on good exhibitions for the track men
daily. Big mats were, also laid on
deck for the wrestlers to work out on.
During the voyage a number of pro-
test meetings were called and the
committee were forced to promise
something better on the return trip.
After twelve days on the water we
landed at Antwerp and were taken by
army trucks to our quarters in a large
school, army cots being set up in the
various class rooms. Sanitary condi-
tions here were poor, and it is a won-
der that some of the boys were not
taken down with serious sickness.
Our first breakafst in Belgium con-
sisted of a cold sardine apiece, which
I suppose the Belgians thought was
sufficient. They soon discovered their
error, however, when the boys begann
jabbering at them in French and Eng-
lish.
The stadium where the games were
held, although not a permanent struc-
ture, was beautiful and picturesque.
It enclosed a quarter-mile track, and
in the center, overlooking the oval,
was the royal box from which the
king and queen watched the games.
The flags of all nations were flown
around the stadium and presented a
pretty sight when unfurled to the
breeze.
A great parade of all the competing
athletes opened the games. Each
team had a distinctive uniform and
the whole formed a pleasing array.
The men of every nation as they
passed the royal box took off their
hats and saluted, the king returning
the'salute. After all the athletes had
passed in review, they were asem-
bled before the king, who gave an ad-
dress of welcome. At the end of his
speech trumpets sounded announcing
the commencement of the games, and
carrier pigeons were loosed to carry
the news, as was the old Greek cus-
tom.
It is unnecessary now to go into the
history of the games. The most in-
teresting feature to Michigan men of
the overwhelming victory which the
Americans secured was the feat of
Carl Johnson, captain of the 1920
track team, in leaping 23 feet 3%
inches for second place in the broad
jump, despite the handicap of the in-
juries sustained in the earlier part of
the season.

t, !

TODAY'S CHURCH SERVICES

' ,

ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR
Headquarters in Lane Hall.
Classes meet in the "Upper
Room."
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses. .
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES

South University Aye.

F. P. ARTHUR, PASTOR

MASONS ATTENTION
Every Mason on the campus invited
to attend the first smoker and get-to-
gether of the year. It will be held
Saturday evening, Oct. 16, at 8:00 p.
m. at the Michigan Union. The Ma-
sonic band will furnish the music for
the occasion.-Adv.

10:30 A. M.-
Sermon by an Elder.

Let us
wash in
Laundry.

7:30 P. M.-
"Regeneration."
9:30 A. M.-
Bible School.

Classes for Students.

keep your clothes clean. We
soft water. White Swan
Phone 165.--Adv.

6

Girls' Attention. Rain Water "Sha
pool, Marcelled Waving, Face a
Scalp Treatment at Mrs. J. R. T
janowski's, 1108 . So. Univers
Phone 696-W.-Adv.

Lp

Dinners are so Hard

FIRST
METHODIST CHURCH
Cor. South State and East
Washington Sts.
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER,
D.D, PASTOR.
10:30 A. M.-"Your Best Strat-
egy.,,
12:00 M.-Student Bible Classes.
6:00 P. M.-Social Half Hour.
6:30 P. M. - Students' Devo-
tional Meeting.
7:30 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild
Lecture by Dean Shailer
Matthews, of Chicago Di-
vinity School.

UNITARIANCHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minsiter.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10
. 10:40 A. M.
"Unitarian Christianity-Its
Affirmation."
This address is intended to
acquaint people with the Uni-
tarian Church, and to let them
know what it ttands for. After
the service there will be a
period of questions and discus-
sion.
5:45 P. M.-Social Half Hour,
with fifteen-cent supper.
6:30 P. M. - Young People's
Meeting, with addresses from'
minis ter and old members. Over
by 7:30.
All Seats Free; and a Welcome

s

to Equal

Opposite D. U, R. Station
Just Above Rae Theatre

-1

ORCHESTRA W UERTIIORGAN MUSIC
SUNDAY MONDAY-TUESDAY

PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Cor. Huron 'and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT,
MINISTER
10:30 A. M.-Theme: "The Sig-
nificance of Jesus Christ."
Noon-Prof. T. M. Iden speaks S
to Student Class.
6:30 P. M.-Christian Endeavor,
with Social Half-Hour at 6.
7:00 P. M.-W. D. Henderson.
Theme, "The Re-Discovery of
America."

Cor. Catherine and Division Sts.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
7:35 A. M.-Holy Communion.
10:30 A. M. -Morning Prayer.
Sermon by the rector, "The
University Student and the
World."
4:30 P. M. - Evening service.
Address by the curate, "Men
for Boolbs or Books for Men?"
the first of a series on "Jesus'
Bible Today."
6:15 P. M.-Brotherhood of St.
Andrew ,meeting in Harris
Hall.

The Crowning Achievement of

Romance

WILLIAM

Rules

the

FARNU M'S

-

World

Brilliant Career.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron Street, below State.
JOHN MASON WELLS, MINISTER
At 10:30 the Minister will preach on
"THE PERFECT LIFE"

The great love story entwined
with the spirit of the days when
stout-hearted men fought for the
heart.of My Lady as gracefully
as they paid their court.

The author's tribute:
"I could almost believe I was
hearing Wm Farnum's voice."
-Justin Huntly McCarthy.
Magnificently Staged and
Enacted by a Flawless Cast

Yearning

Bruce Benson

WILLIAM FARMWVM
P1IRECTIO N' WILL41AM VON

Im.:; a

IN

y A d d ed F ea tu res:
FOX NEWS HANK MANN in "THE NICKEL SNATCHER"
NOTE:-This picture played in New York at $2.20, and at Orchestra
Hall, Detroit, for three weeks at $1.10. Our admission price,
LOWER FLOOR, 50c BALCONY, 35c
Schedule of Shows:
SUNDAY-Shows continuous, starting at 2:00, 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 9:30

I yearn for your smile,
Your eyes of blue,
And wonder if your heart
Is lonesome, too.
I longed to get back
To Michigan,
But now I want to
Steal home again,
To press your true lips,
Our hearts entwine;
That's why I yearn,
Sweetheart of mine!

The Baptist Guild Study Class at 11:50, in the Guild
House, 503 East Huron. "Literature and History f the
Hebrew People." H. R. Chapman, Instructor.
Guild Discussion Meeting, 6:30. Miss Edna Doughty,
Leader.

i

L II KII S n rn,.11 ?ei

SUNDAY

ORPHEUM

MONDAY

ALICE

JOYCE

MASONS, ATTENTION
The regular M a s onic
smoker will be held Satur-
day night, Oct. 16, at 8 p. m.
at the Michigan Union.
Every Mason on the campus is invited
to attend. President Burton will speak.
(Signed) JAMES G. FREY,
Sec'y Craftsmen's Club.
The Kempf Music Studios -Piano,
Organ, and Voice Instruction. Es-
tablished 1880. 312 S Division .St.
Phone 212-J.-Adv.
What is a college student without
his pipe? Get yours early and get
the best-a B. B. B. Full assortment
to select from at HUSTON BROTH-
ERS. "We try to treat you right."-
Adv.

CONGREGATIONAL CHU
At the morning service at 10:30, Mr,. Dou
speaks: "The Re-Discovery of America
12:00. University Religious Forum. P
John R. Brumm speaks: "The Student
Orthodoxy."
6:30. Congregational Students' Associa
Leader, Harry G. Mershon.

IF

RCH

Prof.
and

glas

.T

IN

"TE PR EY
-ALSO

tion.

FOX NEWS

COMEDY

ADULTS, 20c; CHILDREN, 10e

SHOWS AT 2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan