100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y-Y----y--"-.

- --I-- -

Ml

x4tgtttt -ott ill

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for,
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan. as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier o mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ature not necessarily to appear in print, but as aneevidencae of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not neccssariiy endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor ..............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-.,.
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor ............ . ... ..... A. Bernstein
'Editorials. ...........Lee '"'(oodruff, Robert Sage, T. 3.- Whinery
Assistant News ............. ...............E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports ..........................................Robert Angell
Women's Editor............................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph ............. ........ ............ .West Gallogly
Telescope ................................,....Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Thomas E.Dewey M. A. Klaver
Paul G. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Elizabeth Vickery Leo J. Aershdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
George Reindel Brank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
Dorothy Monfort J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Harry B. Grundy W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
Frances Oberholtzer Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
Robert E. Adams J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER...........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising ....................................D. P. Joyce
classifieds..................................Robt. O. Kerr
Publication. . ........ .............F. M. Ieath
Accounts ..... ......................E. R. Priehs
Circulation ......... ..... ......................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
k. W.Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson '
B. G. Gower F. " A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard A l. M. Motle D. G. Slawson
J. J. Harnel Jr. 1). S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

taste as early as possible all the sensations, run the
gamut of all the pleasures of life is not new.
Doubtless the much-tongued 'moral breakdown due
to the war' has had its part, but Fitzgerald is right
when he intimates the change has been cooking for
years. Convention and grownups have always re-
pressed the Jazz Idea in the past, but it has always
been just underneath the surface.
Thirteen-year-olds in evening gowns, hair tip or
more often bobbed; chaperones carefully stowed
away behind ferns; the best shimmier, camel
walker, or toddler at a premium and "cut in on"
every ten steps ; one-night limousine back seat ro-
mances; kissing become almost -as much of a rub-
ber-stamp as the old farewell handshake ; prohibi-
tion enforcement the best joke of the hour, and
youngsters at every turn"piped" or pretending to
be; - all these symptoms have been in the lime-
light of late, and are probably still prominent in
the memory of everyone who saw something of the
late vacation's social whirl in the larger cities.
In a city not far from Ann Arbor the papers and
the preachers suddenly "came to" with a bump
after two weeks of popeyed observation of the an-
tics of the young. "Why!" exclaimed one popular
divine, "The bunch home from college couldn't keep
up with the high school crowd."
Was it a case of "couldn't" or "wouldn't"?
Chances favor the latter. A college education is
supposed to give a person that sense of discrimina-
tion which enables him to distinguish in his pleas-
ures, and to go in for a thing because he wants
to, not merely because "it is done." The follow-
the-crowd cult of the times is just the sort of in-
.anity of which a university training is supposed to
rid a man or woman. This is no homily against
pleasures; by all means let's have them, but let us
choose them ourselves. Is the time far distant
when the possession of this quality of individual
discretion will stand out as a type trait of the col-
lege man or woman?
Utah has a University court to try 4ll sorts of
cases involving the student body. Recently the
court probed the stuffing of ballot boxes in a stu-
dent electtion, with authority to┬░ punish offenders.
Why would not such a body, constituted by au-
thority of the student and empowered by them, be
a good plan at Michigan?
The Telescope
As Tennyson Might Have Written It
Flunks to the right of us -
Flunks to the left of us -
Flunks in front of us -
How can we pass?

A COMPLETE 'LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS"
AT
Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

DET[GOIT UNITED LINES
in Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Minited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. in., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
EImiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e. ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
icocals to IJetroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jacksoil-7:50 a. m., and
12:1.0 p.m.

CALL CK.ANE 625 F-1
for
Anilracite - All Kinds
Pocahontas and Solvay Coke
Ohio & Kentucky Egg & Lump
PRICES RIGHT

MISS MOSES
Private Dancing Lessons
BY APPOINTMENT
Phone 1545 W

Ii- Ii.

999
4
'9

TAXI

999

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service
enough said

JANUARY
S 2 T W T

2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31
Meni:

4
11
18
25

12
19
26

6
13
20
27

F S
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29

T -N
,XI

999

Last season's hats turn-

ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

I

w

i

T. Y
Thrty Years Ago

r:.,r.. . .,

LANDERS
FR
LOW~tRS

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1921.
Night Editor-HUGH W. HITCHCOCK
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
What is considered by authoritative critics, both
in this country and abroad, to be one of the most
significant of modern collections of musical instru-
ments was donated to the University by the late
Frederick Stearns, and occupies a room in Hill
auditorium under the name of the Stearns Col-
lection. It contains about :,5oo examples of every
type of musical instrument.

(From The U. of M. Daily, Jan.
.1891).

8,

Stormed at with frown and look
Told that we need the "hook",
Through all the courses dread
Unprotected by our head
Comes the senior class.

"PAN-AMERICAN DELEGATES ON
THE U. OF IL"
At Louisville, Ky., the Pan-Amer-
ican delegates were interviewed by
the Courier-Journal, and their delib-
erate opinion in regard to the Univer-
sity sent a thrill of pleasure to many
loyal hearts. Being asked what in
this country had most impressed them,
they replied decisively, "The great
boys' college at Ann Arbor.' They
referred to the gathering in University
hall and described the enthusiasm.
"But," said they, "when their hon-
ored president raised his hand, there
was instant quiet." The excellent dis-
cipline and control of the great body
of students was to them a matter of
wonder and admiration .
Enroll now for our day and evening
classes to be organized on Tuesday,
Jan. 11. School of Shorthand, 711 N.
University.-Adv.
An Ann Arbor institution in a class
by itself. Students especially wel-
come. Chinese Gardens. American
management (Charley).-Adv.
I

Flowers of Quality

213 E. LIBERTY ST.

715 N. UNIV. AVE.

WHY NOT UNANIMOUS?
"After New Year's!" was the.answer given be-
fore the holidays to queries as to when the lower
board prices that conditions justified would become
effective. Although this delay was of disadvantage
to students, there are reasons why boarding house
proprietors should have desired to review business
conditions at the critical first-of-the-year period,
before revising prices downward. Had enormously
increased costs prevailed when school was resumed
Wednesday, it is conceivable that no reductions
would have been warranted.
However, this did not prove to be the case. After
playing safe by waiting until after the holidays, eat-
ing house men found conditions even more to their
advantage than before Christmas. Costs were and
are now slightly lower than when vacation began.
In view of these circumstances, and showing a
fairness that will in the end turn out to be business
wisdom, a number of the dealers in cooked food
made "AfteriNew Year's" really mean something
by cutting prices to give patrons a share in the ben-
efits of lower raw food costs. Cafeterias have been
foremost in this policy and several boarding houses
have made fifty cent cuts.
It is regrgetable, however, that this action has
not been unanimous. Unfortunately in some cases
tariffs are still maintained at their highest levels in
complete indifference to the interest of student
patrons, and no hope of reductions is given ex-
cept at the beginning of next semester or some
other date in the distant future.
Apparently the only remedy to prevent these pro-
longed excessive prices in eating houses where
rates are unchanged, is for students to buy more
discriminately by shifting patronage to establish-
ments which are trying to give a square deal and
are not holding back lower prices. Increased busi-
ness and good will are the fair rewards due propri-
etors who have revised tariffs. Food can be sup-
plied at lower prices and there is no reason why re-
visions should not be made in all eating houses.
DISCRIMINATION IN PLEASURES
The Jazz Idea has passed out of music to make
way for melody, but it has only changed its locale;
it lives now not in notes, but in the daily lives and
thoughts of the nation's youth.
Nobody need .read "This Side of Paradise" or
listen to a sermon in order to discover that a great
change has recently come over the attitude of Amer-
ican young people toward morals and conventions.
The transformation is prima facie, on the surface,
brazenly and joyously evident. There is nothing
complex about it; the universal desire of youth to

PHONE 294F1 = F2

Dear Noah:
Don't you honestly believe, right down in your
heart, that the women of the University are better
looking than the town girls? Virginia Dair.
Sorry, Virginia, but we are no judge of paint-
ing, and hence can't competently pass judgment in
this matter.
What has become of the old fashioned humor-
ists who used to do a Samson act by bringing the
house down with this one:
First ham-I was up town last night when they
had a fire at my house.
Second ditto-And what did you do?
First-I ran all the way home.
Second (breathlessly)-And did you save any-
thing?
First-Certainlng-- car fare.
First stude-I just found out the other day that
Bob was a somnambulist.
Second ditto-Zatso ? How did you find it out?
First-I saw him get up in the middle of an Ec.
lecture and walk out.
Yes, Clarice, you're probably right when you say
that truth is stranger than fiction but Philosophy z
is stranger than either.
We're always preaching to our girl that she
should take plenty of physical exercise. So the
other day with the idea of stimulating her interest
along these lines we took her over and showed her
the paraphernalia in Waterman gym.
We finally came upon a medicine ball and our
girl shows her ignorance by asking:
"What's that, Jack?"
Biting down any sarcastic answer we replied
with Job-like patience, "Why that's a medicine
ball."
Our girl shook her head sadly and said, "Well,
I guess there's no hope for me."
"Why not?" we politely asked.
She looked again at the medicine ball and then
replies: "Oh, I just know I could never learn to
swallow that."
Now we know that the fellow who wrote "Ignor-
ance is Bliss" must have run around with our girl's.
sister.
Famous Closing Lines
"Another poor fish pickled," she sighed as she
threw the herring into the brine.
NOAH COUNT.

I R IVETR

H
SOE

SALE

CALL US

1

0
9

It's stock-taking time again and, as is our custom, we shall do
our level best to close out a big share of our stock before tak-
ing Inventory.
YOUR DOLLARS WILL HAVE MORE VALUE HERE
THAN THAT FIXED BY UNCLE SAM

I

I

FOR

MEATS
LET US FIGURE YOUR BILL

A
1~

THE

CENTURY MARKET

213 N. MAIN

(MEN'S SHOES)
$16.00 Cordovan Brogues, now.. $12.85
$15.00 Plain Bno...... 11.85
$15.00 Calf Brogues, now. ...... 11.85
$15.00 Plain Calf, now......... 11.85
$14.00 Plain Calf, now.........10.85
$12.00 and $12.50 Calf, now..... 9.85
$10.00 Calf, now................ 8.85
$ 8.50 Brown Shoes, now....... 6.85

....__

r-My,, DairyLlunch,:i
Our food is the best
Our prices are right
HOURS
7 A.M. TO 1 P. M.
= 5 P. M. TO 7P. M.
SUNDAYS
8 A. M. TO 7:30 P.M.
512 EAST WILLIAM STREET
liI[ll tlin ltIn 1111i iinl 11111 1111 1 v i i

WOMEN'S SHOES REDUCED IN SAME PROPORTION

GROSS and

DIFIZEL

117 EAST WASHINGTON STREET

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan