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January 08, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-08

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THE 'WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COLDER
TODAY

Urr Bk

I3ait!3

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
D)AY AMNNIT lUE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 69. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

GROSS PERVERSION
Of JUSTICE, STATE
NEWBERRY COUNSEL

'Michigan RX.0. T. C. Sharpshooters
To Contest 0.5S. U. Riflemen Mrar. 22

HARDING APPROVES
6.0. P. A RMY LIMIT

DEFENDANTS POIiNT OUT
RESTRICTION PLACED ON
COMMITTEE

NO{

GROTESQUE MEANING
DECLARES C. E. HUGHES
Defense Attempts to Show Michga
Corrupt Practice Act Is
Unconstitutional
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 7.-Conviction of
Senator Truman H. Newberry, of
Michigan, and 16 others of trying to
violate the corrupt practices act was
denounced as a "gross perversion of
justice" by the counsel for the sena-
tor and was upheld by the government
as a lesson to those who would pur-
chase an election "by paid propagan-
da" before the Supreme cout, when
arguments in the appeal were heard.
Grotesque Construction
Charles E. Hughes, former asso-
ciate justice of the court, who headed
counsel for the defense, asserted that
only through a "grotesque" construc-
tion of- the law had the government
been able to present any case to the
jury. He quoted the government's
brief as showing that it was admit-
ted that no restriction was placed by
the law on the expenditure of a po-
litical committee on behalf of any
candidate, nor on the amount which
the committee might raise for a cam-
paign and further, that no attempt
was made by the government to show
that Senator. Newberry had himself
contributed in excess of the legal lim-'
itations of $3,750.
The entire basis of the govern-
ment's case, Mr. Hughes told the
court, was that "this legal commit-
tee, having legally raised a legal sum
of money for a legal purpose, became
an illegal conspiracy because its can-
didate was aware that more than
$3,750 was being expended."
"Act Unconstitutional"
The defense attempted to show the
court that the corrupt practices act
itself, so far as it tended to limit cam-
paign expenditures for legal objects,
was unconstitutional.
Solicitor General Frierson, present-
ing the government's case, took issue
with the theory presented by Mr.
Hughes as to what constituted a vio-
lation of the corrupt practices act.
genator Newberry, according to Mr.
Frierson, being desirous of entering
the United States senate in 1918, call-
ed a conference in New York with
Paul H. King, of Detroit, afterwards
his campaign manager, and Freder-
ick Cody, of New York, superinten-
dent of Detroit schools.
$50,000 Required
At this conference, the question of
the campaign cost arose and Sena-
tor Newberry was told that it would
require the expenditure of $50,000 or
(Continued on Page Eight)
Court Tickets
Remain Unsold
When the Athletic association offic-
es closed yesterday afternoon, the of-
ficials still had a large number of tick-
ets on hand for the Wisconsin and
Iowa basketball games. Distribution
of the tickets will be continued in the
corridor of University hall until noon
today for those who have not yet se-
cured theirs.
Provided there are tickets left over
for the Wisconsin game tonight, they
will be given out at 1:30 o'clock this
afternoon at the same place. Those
who have already secured one set of
tickets will have to present coupon
number 35 in order to get a ticket
for tonight's game.
NOTICE! ALL SENIORS

Dueto labor conditions affect-'
Ing our engravers and printers
the final date for taking of Sen-
lor pictures for the Michigan-
ensian IS JANUARY 22. Ar-
range for sittings immediately.
Saturday, January 22 is the final
date. Don't wait until the last
few days.

Accepting the challenge of the Ohio
State R. 0. T. C. to a rifle contest
with the Michigan R. O. T. C., Major
Willis Shipman of the department of'
military science and tactics announc-
ed that the contest will be held be-
tween picked teams from 3 to 5
o'clock in the afternoon of March 22.
Each six-man team will shoot on its
home range. Results of the shooting
of each team will be wired to the
other as the contest progresses.
New Winchester to Be Used
The rifle used will be the new 22-
BOOKS COMMEMORATE
PILGRIMANNIVERSARY'
LIBRARY DISPLAYS VALUABLE
EDITIONS FROM CLEMENTS'
COLLECTION
Rare and valuable books in com-
memoration of the 300th anniversary
of the landing of the Pilgrims were
placed on exhibit in the main corridor
of the Library yesterday. Although
the date of the anniversary was Dec.
20, 1920, it was decided to wait until
after Christmas vacation before dis-
playing the books. The collection is
from Regent W. L. Clements' library.
Exhibit Almost Unsurpassed
"The exhibit is indicative of the
richness of the Clements library in its
original source of American history,"
said Librarian W. W. Bishop. "The
books shown here surpass in interest
and rarity practically every exhibit in
American libraries of the Pilgrim
Tercentenary. The only other exhib
its equal to this were in Boston and
Cambridge, where the original man-
uscripts were shown. This collection
is confined to 'ooks."
The exhibit opens with maps which
include the second and third maps
showing America as a continent. The
Molyneux ap of the world from the
1595 edition of Hakluy's "Principle of
Navigation" is also shown. It was
issued only 25 years before the land-
ing of the pilgrims and was undoubt-
edly used in navigating the North At-
lantic.
A map of New England by Capt
John Smith which has the author's
portrait in the upper left hand cor-
ner is among the set. The portrait is
the original from which nearly all of
the reproductions are taken.
Rarest Books Describe Voyages
Perhaps the three rarest books in
the exhibit, are the ones by Debry,
Rosier, and Brereton describing the
early voyages to the eastern coast of
North America. The first is a Latin
edition of Hariot's account of Vir-
ginia published in 1595. The relations
of Rosier and Brereton were printed
in 1602 and 1605, respectively.
It was on the information of these
three books that the earliest efforts
of colonization in New England and
Virginia were carried out. The books
are excessively rare, there being only
our known copies in America of the
two relations.
The remainder of the books in the
exhibit give early accounts of the
Massachusetts and Plymouth colo-
nies. Some of the original books de-
scribing the congregations' form of
church government are shown.
Volumes Treat of Persecution
A number of books tell of the
Quakers' persecution in New Eng-
land. Two of the interesting books
deal with the natural history of New
England, while the "Life of John
Eliot," by Cotton Mather, is notable.
"The Bloody Tenent of Persecution,"
by Roger Williams, was produced in1

1644 during the author's visit to Eng-
land while he was engaged in obtain-
ing the charter of Rhode Island. It
gives a furious protest against eccle-
siastical interference with liberty of
conscience.
FATHER OF 0. W. RUSH, JUNIOR
LIT CLASS PRESIDENT, DIES
J. W. Rush, whose son is 0. W.
Rush, president of the juiior lit class,
passed away Thursday at his home in
Red Oak, Ia., after an illness. of six
weeks duration following a stroke of
paralysis. President Rush was sum-
moned home shortly after the first ap-
pearance of his father's illness. Due
to his long absence from college it is
possible that he will not return until
next semester.

caliber Winchester, which is espe-
cially adapted to target work 'and
practice shooting. Ten of these rifles
have just been received here. Both
50 and 75 foot ranges will be used,
with the usual X target as a mark.
As no rifle team represents the R.
0. T. C. as yet, an elimination meet
will be held to select the six men who
will compose the team. Every mem-
ber of the R. O. T. C. who wishes to
do so will be allowed to try out for
the team by firing a certain number
of rounds, and the six men who maket
the highest score will form the team.t
Former Army Team Men Return
For several years before the war
Michigan marksmen held a high place
in Class B of the National Rifle as-
sociation, shooting against the lead-
ing college teams of the country and
winning the championship in 1916.(
Several men who were on this team
have returned to school following]
service on some of the leading rifle
teams of the U. S. army and should
strenghthen the Wolverine team ap-t
preciably.t
BOOK BY LOCALt
MAN LEADS FIELD
Prof. E. 1). Dickinson's Work Declared
Most Comprehensive of Day 1
Treating a subject brought forward
by the war and a discussion of the
League of Nations and the Teaty of<
Versailles, Prof. Edwin D. D ,kinson
of the Law school has written a new
book entitled "The Equality of States1
in International Law," which hast
just been issued by the Harvard Uni-e
versity Press. It contains 424 pagesz
and handles the subject in detail and
with attention to facts which have
never before been touched upon au-t
thoritatively.
Importance of Work Recognized
The importance of this work was
recognized before it was printed to
such an extent that the House Com-
mission to the Peace conference prior
to President Wilson's departure for
Paris secured a copy of the manu-
script for use in its work here and t
during the Peace conference.
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school said of the book, "It is a most
important contribution to a subject
which has long been the object of
much discussion and dissension be-
tween nations. The subject has been
debated with much vehemence at the
meetings of the Assembly and Coun-
cil of the League of Nations, particu-
larly by the smaller nations.
"Book Complete and Excellent"
"Professor Dickinson's book is the
most comprehensive and authoritative
treatment of the matter of the rights
of nations in print today. The work
is complete and excellent in every de-
tail. There is an important supple-
mentary chapter to the book on the
Treaty of Versailles and the League
as affecting the subject."
RICHARDS' TALK
"ABSURD"---WILCE
Indianapolis, Jan. 7.-Regret that
a controversy should arise between
members of the Western Conference
was expressed today by Coach John
Wilce, of the Ohio State university
football team, after reading the state-
ment of Coach John R. Richards, of
Wisconsin, intimating that he would
resign if Ohio State is again placed on
the Wisconsin athletic schedule.
"I am sorry that such a thing as

this had to come up in the Big Ten
Conference from a Conference coach,"
said Wilce, "not only because it is an
attempted slam at Ohio State but also
because it tends to throw a bad light
on a great organization and misin-
form the general public in regard to
high, clean spirit of sportmanship that
exists among universities."
Statements attributed to Richards
that visiting coaches received poor
treatment at Ohio State were brand-
ed by Wilce as "absurd."
M. P. Adams, '1SE, Here on Business
Milton P. Adams, '18E, is in Ann
Arbor this week-end on business with
Hoad and Decker, consulting engi-
neers. Adams is a Tau Beta Pi man.
He is now in charge of sewage dispos-
al studies at Grand Rapids.

Deeply (concerned in Reduction of
Burden by Decreasing Force
to 150,000 Men

DOES NOT EXPECT TROUBLE IN
NEAR FUTURE,. DECLARES KAHN
(By Associated Press)
Marion, Jan. 7.-The plan of the Re-
publican leaders in congress to limit
the peace time strength of the army
to 150,000 men was given approval to-
day by President-elect Harding in a
conference with Representative Kahn,
of California, chairman of the house
military committee.
Senator in Accord with Policy
"Senator Harding is in complete ac-
cord with our policy," said Represent-
ative Kahn after a long talk with the
President-elect. "He is deeply con-
cerned about the reduction of the bur-
den now resting on the shoulders of
taxpayers and he believes much can
be saved by reducing the army strength
to 175,000, as soon as possible, and
then working it down to 150,000 as a
continuing minim um.
"I am sure Senator Harding does
not believe that the millenium has
come, but I do not think he is ex-
pecting trouble in the near future."
Conference One of Series
The con herence at which Mr. Hard-
ing also expressed his desire for a
well organized reserve force was one
of a series he is holding with con-
gressional leaders in charge of mili-
tary and naval legislation. Soon he
is too see Chairman Butler, of the
house naval committee, to urge re-
trenchment in that arm of the service
and to seek a continuing policy for
naval armament.
School Of Music
Faculty To Give
Concert Sunday
In her first appearance this season,
Mrs. Grace Johnson-Kenold, colora-
tura soprano, will sing a recitative
and aria from Verdi's "La Traviata"
at the concert by the faculty of the
University School of Music at 3
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in Hill
auditorium. In addition she will of-
fer a group of songs. Miss Marian
Struble and Mrs. George B. Rhead will
also appear on the program, whichl
follows:
Sonata, F major, Op. 24....Beethoven
Allegro; Adagio molto espres-
sivo; Scherzo (Allegro mol-
to); Rondo (Allegro ma non
troppo)
Miss Struble and Mrs. Rhead
Recitative-E Strano
Aria-Ah, fors' e lui.......... Verdi
Mrs. Johnson-Konold
Reflets dans l'eau ......... Debussy
The Contrabandista...........
.Schumann-Tausig
Etude, G flat, Op. 24, No. 1......
.............::......Moszkowski
Mrs. ahead

Tax

FEW RESPOND TO CONTEST
Closing Date for Judge College Wits'
Humor Competition is Jan. 21
"Only a few contributions for the
second College Wits' contest have been
received," said Howard Weeks, '21, ed-
itor of the Gargoyle, yesterday. These
have been sent to the office of Judge,
the magazine holding the contest. As
soon as contributions are received
they will be sent in.
As the closing date of this contest
has been set for Jan. 21, there remains
only two weeks in which Michigan
students will be able to contest their
wit with that of other colleges. It is
hoped that more contributions will be
received soon. Address them to Ed-
itor, Gargoyle, University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
STATE SOCIAL WORKERS
HOLD CONFERENCE HERE
STATEMENT PRESENTED AS TO
NEED OF NEW TRAINING,
COURSE HERE
Requesting that a more definitely
organized course for the training of
workers in social and recreational
fields be installed in the University,
social workers of Detroit, Grand Rap-
ids, and Bay City met with President
Marion L. Burton, the committee on
educational policy of the Board of Re-
geps, and members of the University
faculty in an informal conference
Thursday afternoon.
The social workers presented on
their part a clear statement as to the
need of the University for such a
course, stating"that a far more general
one was necessary. The matter was
discussed, and the proposition for a
four or five year course and the use of
the city af Detroit as a laboratory for
the working out of social problems
talked over., In the opinion of many
of the visitors, Detroit is the logical
place for such a laboratory, it being
necessary to visit the slums of a large
city and to inspect the law courts.
The matter of a more extensive
course for the training of social and
recreational workers has been brought
to the attention of the University by
the workers of the state several times
within the last '20 years. Several
courses of the above nature are now
being given in the University, but it
is believed by many that a more sys-
tematic and general system of courses
should be developed.
The results of Thursday's meeting
wiere highly satisfactory and it is
probable that a more specific plan
will be presented to the University in
the near future. Among the men at
the conference were Charles Cody,
superintendent of the Detroit public
school system; Fred Butzel, prominent
Detroit philanthropist, and the secre-
tary of the Detroit civil service board.

TWO RESOLUTIONS
ofIM PORTANCE,
PASSED 6BY BOARD
DEPARTMENT FEES DETERMINED
FOR SUMMER SESSION OF
1921
PROF. HOBBS GRANTED
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Chase Osborn, Former Governor, Re-
gent, Contributes Funds for
Geological Expledition
Two important resolutions dealing
with the problem of a separate Col-
lege of Architecture and with the
need for training for social workers
in the University were adopted at the
January meeting of the Board of Re-
gents, held yesterday in the Regents'
room in the Law building.
The first resolution takes up the
question of a College of Architecture,
which has been under consideration
for some time. The resolution as
adopted by the Regents follows:
"Resolved-That the committee on
educational policies be requested to
continue its study of the problem of a
separate College of Architecture, par-
ticularly in its relationship to the
Fine Arts, including the present
courses in Art, Landscape Design, and
Music, and at the proper time to re-
port its findings to the Board of Re-
gents."
Training Course Advocated
Need for training of social work-
ers was recognized by the Regents,
and their resolution is to the end
that careful study may be given the
situation before action is taken. It
follows:
"Resolved-That the President in
co-operation with the deans and other
..rawnuan,eacosctaieR fifi un
persons concerned make a careful
study of the needs for the trainng of
social workers in the state of Michi-
gan, and the best methods by which
the University could undertake to
meet these needs; and that they re-
port their conclusion to the commit-
tee on educational policies of the
Board."
" Prof. William H. - Hobbs, of the
Geology department, was granted
leave of absence for the next acad-
emic year. The leave is given in or-
der that Professor Hobbs may go on
a scientific expedition throughout the
Southern Pacific ocean. He also plans
to spend some time at an European
university center before his return to
IAnn Arbor. The expedition is made
possible by the donation of funds by
Chase S. Osborn, former governor of
Michigan and regent of the Univer-
sity.

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OVER THE WIRE

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To a Hill Top .................. Cox
Sunshine Song ............... Grieg
Villanelle .............. Dell 'Acqua
Mrs. Konold
The public is reminded to be seat-
ed on time as the doors will be clos-
ed during the performance of the
number. Patrons are also request-+
ed to refrain from bringing small
children.
DEAN E. H. KRAUS IS ELECTED
PRESIDENT OF CONOPUS CLUB
E. H. Kraus, professor of mineral-
ogy and dean of the University Sum-
mer session was elected president of
the Conopus club at its annual meet-
ing of the Union Thursday evening.
Other officers elected were: Sid Mil-
lard, vice-president; Herbert Silves-
ter, secretary; and Carl Braun, treas-
urer. Frank DeVine is the retiring
president.
LEGION MEMBERS REQUESTED
TO 'TRANSFER TO NEW POST
All members of the American
Legion who have not already had their
memberships transferred to the new
University post are urgently request-
ed to do so at once. The new Uni-
versity post is Post No. 303. The next
meeting will be on Jan. 20, and it is
expected that the present membership
will be greatly increased by that date.

Washington, Jan. 7.-Searching in-
vestigation into the headquarters of-
fice of the government's prohibition
enforcement officers was announced by
internal revenue bureau officials to-
night to determine if there was any
connection between employees here
and the alleged "whisky ring" con-
spiracy in New York to obtain fraud-
ulent permits for withdrawing liquor.
Miss Irene Richardson, a clerk in
the permit division of the prohibition
office, was suspended today pending
the investigation. Commissioner of
Internal Revenue Williams declined
tonight to discuss reports of irregu-
larities in the issuance of permits.
Salina, Kan., Jan. 7. - Efforts to
form a state organization to 6ppose
the activities of non-partisan league
leaders in conference will be made at
a meeting here next Monday, it was
announced today. Governor Allen was
invited to attend. Announced plans
call for the establishment of head-
quarters from which a state campaign
against the non-partisan league now
in process of organization in Kansas,
will be conducted.
New Ventilating System in Effect
Installation of the new ventilating
system in the auditorium of University
hall being completed, the system is
now in use.

Stanley's Resignation Aedepted
The resignation of Prof. Albert A.
Stanley, of the School of Music, was
accepted with regret. The resigna--
tion, to take effect at the end of the
present academic year, will mark the
close of Professor Stanley's 33 years
of service to the University.
Prof. Clifford Woody, of the Uni-
versity of Washington, was appoint-
ed professor of education in the Uni-
versity, effective Oct. 1 of this year.
Professor Woody will be director of
the bureau of tests and measures, and
after he takes up his work with the
University, Prof. Guy M. Whipple will
have the title of professor of exper-
imental education. Charles C. Fries
was promoted from instructor in Eng-
lish to assistant professor in that de-
partment.
Fees for the Summer session of
(Continued on Page Eight)

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POWDERED FACES TO BE
SLAPPED, SAYS VOLIVA
Zion, Ill., Jan. 7.-Hereafter
women in the Zion tabernacle
will appear with unpowdered
noses or Overseer Voliva will
"lecture 1them and slap their
faces," according to an edict de-
livered today.
"The use of the worldly pow-
der puff is a violation ..of .the
sanctity of God's house; it is a
sacrilege and a disgrace. You'll
come here unpowdered and you'll
cover your bodies as my grand-
mother covered hers or I'll
you and slap your faces instead
of powdering them."

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