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October 10, 1920 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

e

The Screen

This Week In
Ann Arbor

(By Edwin R. 1%eiss)
Among the prospects for a week
of blood curdlers at the various movie
houses in Ann Arbor, two pictures
initiating the week's program prom-
ise to offer the best entertainment.
The first -of these, appearing at the
Majestic from today through Tuesday,
stars Mae Murray and David Powell,
the title being "The Right to, Love."
The picture is adapted from a French
play and is quite intricate, dealing'
with a husband and wife, living in
Constantinople for diplomatic rea-'
sons, who agree to disagree, but both
of whom are interested in another
one of the opposite sex.
This results in numerous complica-
tions and absorbing episodes, and
finally in a murder and more compli-
cations which in the end are solved
to the complete satisfaction of the
audience.
The other picture which offers
most to the public appears at the
Wuerth, also beginning today. Wil-
liam Farnum in "If I Were King"
again plays an interpretative role.
in "Les Miserables" Farnum recently

gave a very fine characterization of
that novel, and if the past is any cri-
terion for the future, this new dram-
atization or "scenarization" should
prove exceedingly interesting to the
University public.
For those who desire no stars at
all, the Arcade is furnishing a Rex
Beach story with an all-star cast. Its
title, "Going Some," refers to a foot
race upon which a ranch is wagered.
Just before the race oil is struck on
the aforementioned ranch, a thing
which was not considered in the
wager. Legal proceedings are insti-
tuted, but in order to save the au-
dience from the ennui of a court-
room trial the author kindly settles
the affair out of court in a manner
at the same time plausible and un-
expected (something unusual in a
movie). The picture promises to be
up to the standard of Rex Beach
stories.
As concerns the middle-of-the-week
shows, the Arcade has the edge.
Ethel Clayton appears there, sup-
ported very efficiently by Jack Holt,
in the play, "Crooked Streets." The

on Friday; once at the Arcade in "The
Man Who Had Everything," the usual
story of the pampered son of the idle
T e Stage 'rich whose career of reckless dissipa-
tion is sidetracked into the paths of
righteousness by some experience or
other with a blind man; and at the
'same time down at the Orpheum where
picture is a melodrama, very well di- he plays "In Wrong," taking the part
rected, and with a beautiful China of a young villager, for which he has
setting. Miss Clayton plays the part always been best adapted.
of a girl in the secret service who
takes a position as secretary with, a
family of crooks who are going to
China presumably in the search of
ancient vases.
The picture holds the interest of the
audience throughout and is well worth
taking an hour and a half off to see.
The Majestic for Wednesday-Thurs-
day offers the "Jack-Knife Man," di-
rected by King Vidor. The plot con-!
cerns a boy who has run away from H eadquarte
home and is just making good selling
Jack-knives to house-wives, when a
peculiar situation forces him to spend Parker
all that he has earned, and leaves in
his care a little cripple. The plotj
promises one continuous round of
thrill but the cast is nothing to
boast of.
On Wednesday night, the legitimate
stage attracts us to the Whitney for
"Take It From Me," a musical comedy
by Will B,. Johnston and Will R. Ander-
son. The show comes direct from De-
troit, if that is anything to its credit.'
The plot has to do with the troubles
of a young man who is bequeathed a
department store and who attempts to
run it. Efficiency is no word for what
result.! L. C. SMITH.
The musical numbers should proveLI
quite entertaining. John Hennings,'
Richard Mack, and Alice Hills are
there to provide the laughs; and say,
fellows, on the Q. T., it's whispered
around that Marjorie Sweet renders,
to those that will look, a very pleasing
vampire dance.
With the appearance of Elsie Fergu-
son in "Lady Rose's Daughter," at the
Majestic Friday and Saturday, the pub-;
lic gets the opportunity of seeing a
picture from which one can depart un-
ruffled, instead of feeling as if he had
gone through a steam laundry. Miss
Ferguson plays the part of a young,
woman of high birth who has fallen:
into disgrace merely because of the
fact that her female ancestors for two
generations back had had the Innocenti
tendency to disagree with their hus-!
bands and to elope with other men.
As a result there is a taint upon her!
name which would prevent any con-
scientious highbrow from marrying
her.I

Brother Dustin Farnum follows
closely on William's heels at the'
Wuerth in "Big Happiness." If ad-
vance reports may be believed, the
story offers quite a few peppy epi-
sades, and 'Brother Dusty should not
lose anything by being set off against
Brother Willie.
The Majestic offers the only feature
c comedies of the week, beginning with
Buster Keaton in "One Week" on Sun-,

day, and ending up with a Sennett
"Sheriff Nell's Tussle" on Friday and
Saturday.
Taken-altogether, the first and last
part of the week promise to offer the
best in moving pictures in general, and
those who can't tide over from one
period to the other will have a nice
sparkling musical comedy to satisfy
their dramatic appetites in the middle
of the week.

0 ,

rs for Conklin, Waterman,

,s

Schaeffer

and other

eading

makes

NaINr
-- s U U r s u U

Of
PENS

B'i

THE TYSON MAKE

THE
SHIRT
TRADE MARK REGD

CORONA, HAMMOND and
PE"WRITERS
of all kinds
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade

d

i

Of White

Golf and Polo

SHIRTS

The Shirt University Men
Wear
TINKER AND COMPANY
South State at William Street

_ . .

.-.

d1 -

Consequently one falls in love with
her on the spot, and there the plot
thickens. Although it furnishes a good
entertainment, "Lady Rose's Daugh-
ter'-' is not quite up to Miss Ferguson's
usual standards of quality.
Jack Pickford comes to town twice

I

r VM
w'' ill

rlk

Phil Diamond's
Orchestra
PRESENT
six combinations at liberty for the season 1920-21
DIRECTED BY
PHIL DIAMOND
"DOc" WRIGHT
"BILL" O'DONNELL

iI

TRADE

MARK

Y

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WORLD'S LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES

"ARNIE" PRATT

"DOC" FRENCH

*

GEORGE LYNN

OFFICE: 324 S. STATE S.

PHONE 1038-W

_ __

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