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January 05, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY PL

I. fssioal bll, nd wll sickVo Mic

CAMPUS ATHLETICS
ENJOY POPULAR1I
Intramural Office Reports Record
Number Turning Out for Var-
ious Sports
HOCKEY AND BASKETBALL
LEAGUES-NEXT ON SCHEDULE
With the last pin knocked over in
the class bowling to rnament, and the
final swimming meet finished, the in-
tramural office has completed the first
part of its program for the year.
During the fall season, Director
Mitchell has made r arrangements for
both fraternity and class contests in
soccer, bowling, swimming, football,
tennis, and cross country. The result
of these affairs has been satisfactory
to the intramural office and indicate
that the campus is taking a mueh
greater interest in athletics than in
the past. Some of the sports that
were inaugurated this semester
were caught up by the classes and
fraternities with such spirit that the
intramural office had to work day and
night to keep up with this unexepect-
ed'turn of affairs.-
Soccer New Sport
Soccer made its appearance as ani
intramural sport this fall. Neverthe-
less there were 31 teams in two dif-
ferent leagues, playing on Ferry field.
It was thought that last year .an un-
beatable record was set when 22
teams entered in the bowling tourney.
But this number was greatly over-
the Union alleys. It is interesting tc
note that the quality of this year's
teams surpassed that of last season's
aggregations by a considerable marg-
in. The two high marks of last fall
of 605 and 579 for three successive
games looks meager when compared
with this' year's tallies. There were six
high counts ranging between 641 and
622 for the set of three games. Alsc
quite a number of bowlers bowled the
pins for scores falling near the 602
mark.
The same success attended this sem-
ester's football league, 47 teams turn-

ing out against 28 last year. In 1919f
49 men signed up for cross country
while 84 hill and dalers came out this
season. The greatest increase is
noted in swimming, for notwithstand-

Wesbrook Ranked FOUL SHOOTING CONTEST IS
NEXT INTRAMURAL EVENT

No. 28 in Tennis

I1

ing the fact that the season is hardly Walter K. Wesbrook, '22, for two
begun 150 swimmers have turned out years Western Conference tennis
as compared with .last year's 77. singles champion and a prominent
Other Leagues Soon contender in the national tournament
During January and February, var- at Forest Hills, Long Island, last sum-
ious leagues will be formed in hock- met, is given a rating of 28th in the
ey and basketball. There will be two national tennis rankings for 1920.
hockey tourneys, one for fraternities Wesbrook is also, a member of the
and the other for class competition. track and field team, in the pole vault
Anyone who made the informal hockey andbroad jump events. In 1918 Wes-
team last year is ineligible for en- brook was given 33 and last year plac-
trance in either tournament. ed 55th.
Four leagues will be organized in W. T. Tilden, II, of Philadelphia,
basketball. Classes, departments, fra- world's singles champion was first in
ternities and campus organizations the ranking, and William Johnston, of
will each have separate tournaments. San Francisco, second. Both of these
A player may participate in two differ- men are members of the American
ent league teams if de desires. That is, tennis team that defeated Australia in
a man may play on a campus organiza- the finals of the Davis cup matches at
tion team and a fraternity team with- Auckland,o New Zealand.
out violating any rule. The campus The first 10 in the ranking are as
organization includes any campus follows:
group not classed as a fraternity, such W. T. Tilden, II, Philadelphia, Pa.
as honorary societies and sectional Wm. M. Johnston, San Francisco.
clubs. R. N. Williams, II, Boston.
It is intended by the Intramural of- I. Kumagae, New York.
fice to put off the class basket ball W. E. Davis, San Francisco.
tourney until the opening of the C. 1. Griffin, San Francisco.
second semester. In this manner a Watson Washburn, New York.
line may be gained on the prospec- C. S. Garland, Pittsburgh.
tive class team players from the tour- N. W. Niles, Boston.
naments which precede, and all the Wallace F. Johnson, Philadelphia.
players will be in top season-form. A a._
cup will be given the winning frater-
nity team in the .house league, while Yost Refuses 1
medals will be awarded the winners
of the department aid campus organ- Virginia 0 f f e r
ization tournament.

Intramural athletic activities will
open Thursday, and continue Friday,
with the second annual foul shooting
contest. This event, inaugurated last
year,, brought out a large entry list,
and was won by Nathan Lorah, '21,
with a total of 83 baskets in 100 trials.
Carleton Wells, '20, was second with
80 in 100 attempts. Waterman gym-
nasium will be open from 1 to 3
o'clock each afternoon, and from 7:30
to 8:30 o'clock in the evening.
All entrants must shoot 15 of their
first 25 attempts, and all doing so will
be eligible to complete the full quota
of 50. The 10 with the highest total
will then shoot 50 more, and the best
score in 100 shots will be counted.
Patronfre Daily advertisers.-Adv
Read The Daily for Campus News.

PRATT NOT GOING
BACK TO MAJORS
Derrill Pratt, new Michigan diamond
coach, will not play professional base-
ball next year, and probably will nev-
er return to the big leagues, at least,
until after his three year contract with
Michigan expires.
According to report, Pratt, who
went to the Boston Red Sox as a re-
sult of an eight man deal between that
team and the, New York Yankees,
would play with Boston in the 1921
campaign. Pratt, however, has an-
ounced that he is through with pro-

fessional ball, and will stick to Mich-
igan and the coaching game.
Paronize Daily Advertiers.-Adv.

SREST

Home of Sweet and Purity
Always Fresh

302 S. Main

Phone 474.W

!
t .
* .:

Ba-Adjustment Sale
Now On

I

LARGEST ISLAND OF OUTER
HEBRIDES ADOPTS PROHIBITION
Stornoway, Scotland, bDec. 16.-(De-
layed.)-The island of Lewis, the larg-
est of the Outer Hebrides, has over-
whelmingly voted "dry" in the prohi-
bition poll taken here.
For total abolition there were 720
'votes; for no change, 149, and for lim-
itation of drink licenses, 5.
As a result, all licenses .on the is-
land will be annulled next May.
Lewis is a rugged island which
abounds in ancient Druidic structures
and ruined old-time fortresses.

Bear stories now current, that Field-
ing H. Yost, Varsity football coach at
Michigan for 20 seasons, will not be
here next year, are emphatically de-
nied by Yost himself. When turning
down the offer made him by the Uni-
versity bf West Virginia, he said that
when he quit coaching at Michigan he
would quit coaching. Several other
schools have also asked the Michigan
leader to take- charge of their grid-
iron squads, but with no more success
than the West Virginia school.
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.

"THERE'S NOTHING TO DO
IN TIlNS OLE TOWN"
Have you ever said that when
you're tired of the movies, and
your best girl is out of town,
and you feel sort of "unneces-
sary?"
Just note the address at the
bottom of this advertisement
and drop in here "just to look
around" and watch the players.
You'll soon find a partner for
a game of "rotation" or
"straight" and forget all about
your lonesomeness.
This is a clean, decent place,
one which you'll enjoy visiting
regularly. Come in today.
HUSTON BROS.
Pocket and Carom Billiards.
Cigars and Candles.'
Soft Drinks and Light Lunches.
.Cigarettes and Pipes.
"We Try to Treat You Right"
No. 2

$14.00 Shoes, now.

S 11.20

$13.00 Shoes, now ... .

... 10.40

$12.00 Shoes, now.....
$10.00 Shoes, now .... .

9.60
8.00

$16.00 Shoes, now .. .

Determined to close out completely all Winter Shoes-
Oxfords and Pumps-for Men and Women.
This cut takes care of three different things:

.$12.80

The Break in Wholesale Prices

$15.00 Shoes, now,....

Any Further Break that may happen in Spring

12.00

And Our Usual Mid-Winter Reductions

A MOST FAVORABLE CHANCE TO BUY HIGH GRADE
SHOES
Walk-Over Boot Shop

115' South Main Street

%C

ri

I -' I

ACCURACY,.

DISPATCH,

NEATNESS,

COURTESY

- --these are our Ideas of SERVICE
Service also includes complete facilities for the transaction of every

kind of business.

I

We maintain a Commercial Department and

a Savings

Depart-
country

ment; buy and sell

foreign

exchange,

on nearly

every

in the world; safeguard your valuables in our safety deposit boxes;
loan money.
Come in and gbt acquainted.

THE

ANN

ARBOR

SAVINGS

BANK

Organized 1869
RESOURCES $5,400,000.00

Offices:- Northwest Corner Main and Huron and 707 North University Avenue

_ .. ..

-doolbk

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