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January 05, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-05

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; SOMEWHAT
COLDER TODAY

I

r ~ir

4tl

ASSOCIAT
PRESS

EAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 66.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1921.

PRICE FIVE

r

1 (

RESULTS OF POOL
CAMPA1IN TO DATE[
NOT ENCOURAGING

Reasons For Poor Work On Part Of
Students To Be Determined By Tests
Similar To Ones Employed In Army

VARSITY WINS 6
CONTESTS ON TRIP

ASCRIBED TO LACK OF WORK
PART OF STUDENTS
SOLICITING

ON

TOTAL OF FUND NOW
LITTLE OVER $5,900
Plans for Other Ways of Raising
Money to Be Made in
Near Future
Reports and money as handed in by
the men who.volunteered to raise the
money for the completion of the Union
swimming pool were discouraging ac-
,cording to the final reports yesterday
afternoon.
Beforetvaaton $8,079 had been
pledged to the Union by alumni. Of
this amount $1,500 was totaled by two
subscriptions which were given by
prominent alumni to act as an incen-
tive to the students who were to do
the actual soliciting.
Total Now $5900
About $900 came in yesterday's
mail, bringing the total since the
start of vacation to $2,900 or a sum
total of a little over- $5,900 on the
$50,000 that is needed. Union officials
ascribe the failure to the lack of co-
operation and real work on the part
of, the men who pledged themselves
to do the solicitng during the vaca-
tion. There will probably be more
coring in during the next few days
but results so far indicate that the
drive will not go over.
To Make Other Plans
"Other measures will have to be
adopted to raise the money," said
Maynard A. Newton, '22, chairman of
the drive. "The failure of the stu-
dents to get out and work for this
addition to the facilities of the Union
is undoubtedly due to the typical hol-
iday vacations, which are invariably
without thought for University life.
That we will raise the money is cer-
- tain and other plans will be made as
soon as the last of the reports are
in."t
Poor business conditions have been
blamed by many as one of the most
drastic of the reasons for the drive
not succeeding. At this time many
of the alumni have also to contend
with t~,es and the holiday expenses
which make it difficult for a man,
however much interested, to subscribe
a large amount.
FOUR NEW MEN ADDED TO.
PERSONNEL OF R. 0. T. C.
Local Organization Receives Large
Supply of Military Equip-
ment
Lieut. F. W. Hoorn, Master Sgt. Har-
ry F. Miller, and first class Privates
Joseph Yunevich and Hairm Allen,
have been added to the personnel of
the local R. 0. T. C. Lieutenant
Hoorn, who is assistant professor of
military science and tactics, will have
charge of the student signal corps.
Sergeant Miller succeeds Sgt. R. W.
Collier, who has been transferred to
the Sixth Service company at San An-
tonio, Texas. Sergeant Miller served
as signal corps captain during the
war.
The local contingent has also re-
ceived a large addition of new equip-
ment, including a five-ton caterpillar
tractor, a 155 nm. G. P. F. rifle, an
eight-inch howitzer, a mortar plotting
board, a terrain board, a submarine
minng case and other small items,
such asspowder samples, fuses, etc.
FACULTY MEN AT CONFERENCE
OF MODERN LANGUAGE ASS'N
Several representatives from the

University of Michigan attended a
meeting of the Modern Language asso-
ciation held Wedlnesday, Dec. 29, at
the University of Chicago.
Prof. Solomon F. Gingerich of the
'English department read a paper on
"The Turning Point in iWordsworth's
Religious Faith." Profs. Hugo P.
Thieme and Charles P. Wagner of.
the romance language department and
Prof. Samuel Moore of the English
department were also present at the

Students on probation will be given
mental tests in order to determine the
reasons for their poor work and to
find out what line of study is especi-
ally adapted to them. This ruling was
adopted at a recent faculty meeting
and will be enforced immediately.
The bureau of mental tests and
PLANSPROGRESSING FOR.
NEW ATHLETIC STADIUM
PROF. J. H. CISSELL DRAWING UP
DESIGNS; STANDS TO HOLD
46,000
Plans. for the new Ferry field stad-
ium are progressing well, according to
Prof. J. H. Cissell, of the engineering
college,;who is drawing them up, and
they will be submitted within 10 days
to contractors throughout the United

States.

Numerous inquiries have been re-
ceived from various bidders within
the last few weeks, and much inter-
est isbeing manifested. Among the
recent inquiries is one from a New
York City contractor, who designed
the stadium of the College of the City
of New York. Following the submit-
ting of the plans to the contractors
the proposals will be acted upon by
the Board in Control of Athletics.
, "The stadium," said Professor Cis-
sell yesterday, "will take care of two
cities the size of Ann Arbor, and will
seat 43,000 people. This capacity is
the average and is the same as that
of the Harvard stadium.".
NEWBERRY APPEAL
IN SUPREME4 COURT
Washington, Jan. 4.-A strange le-
gal mixture was disclosed today,
when counsel appeared for hearing of
the Newberry appeal before the su-
preme court. Earle Houck, who was
chief assistant to Frank C. Dailey in
preparation of the Newberry case, has
since been employed by Charles E.
Hughesas an investigator in connec-
tion with Mr. Hughes' private law
practice. Mr. Hughes is now chief
counsel for Mr. Newberry and his co-
defendants.
Messrs. Dailey and Hihes are
fellow counsel for the defense in the
case of the government against the
coal miners and operators growing
out of the strike in the 'winter of
1919-1920. Mr. Dailey in this case
represents the coal operators and Mr.
Hughes the miners.
Mr. Houck, who first became as-
sociated with Mr. Daily in the pros-
ecution of officials at Terre Haute
and in Indianapolis, was placed in
full charge of the secret service staff
in the investigation which preceded
the calling of the Newberry grand
jury in Grand Rapids. He remained
through the trial as a principal as-
sistant in the prosecution.
FUNERAL RITES FOR J. J.
WALSER TO BE HELD TODAY
Graduate of Class of '00E Died in
Florida Saturday After
Long Illness
Funeral services for the late Jo-
seph J. Walser, 'OOE, will be held at
2 o'clock this afternoon from the fam-
ily residence at 1043 Baldwin avenue.
Rev. Lloyd Douglas will officiate and
the funeral will be private.
The deceased died Saturday at Lake
Worth, Florida, following aih illness
of more than a year's duration. He
was connected with the Goss Printing!
company of Chicago. A widow and
four daughters survive.
POET GENERAL WILL BE
LAST MAN TO LEAVE TRIEST

measurements will give the tests and
the results will be filed in the' dean's
office for future reference and for use
of administrative officials. They will
be given as soon as the details con-
nected with them are worked out.P
The tests are of a psychological na-
ture are are somewhat similar to the
army tests. They will not only be of
use to University officials in determ-
ining the reasons for delinquent work,
but also will aid the students as it
will point out to them the cause ofI
their poor work and show them what
line of work they are adapted to and
aid them in choice of studies.
Many groups of students no doubt
will stand out clearly the officials be-
lieve. These students have ample
ability to do the work and will be
made to bring their marks up immed-
iately, as tir poor work is clearly
a case of neglect..
The students who are poor will be
aided in finding something for which
they are fitted and will be shown how
to over come their defects.
5-YEAR ARI0iITECTURL
COURSE MEETS PPOVL
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FAVORS
NEW PLAN AS BENEFICIAL
TO STUDENTS3
Declaration in favor of a five year,
course for students in architecture
was mrade at a recent conference In;
Philadelphia of the committee on ed-
ucation from the American institute
of architecture and the executive com-
mittee of the association of collegiate
schools of architecture.-
Prof. Emil Lorch attended the meet-
ing and represented the interests of
the University in the proceedings. Ac-
cording to Professor Lorch, the addi-
tion of another year of study is in-
tended to give an opportunity for the
presentation of more courses of a
general cultural nature than is now
possible in the four year course of
architecture.
Report of the action of the two com-
mittees will be made at the annual
conventions of the organizations next
May.
PREPARE SUMMER
SESSION CATALOG
Announcements for the 1921 Sum-
mer session are now being compiled,
according to Dean E. H. Kraus, and
an abridged bulletin will probably be
ready for distribution in time for
the second semester elections.
"We have a tremendously attractive
program," said Professor Kraus yes-
terday. "Our Summer school differs
from that of all other universities," he
stated, "in that it includes most of the
courses of the regular sessions, and
these are, in turn, given by the regu-
lar faculty and not merely by certain
instructors who teach during the sum-
mer only."
Dean Kraus is a believer in stu-
dents completing their University
work, by means of the Summer
school, in as short a time as possible
in order to make room for others and
avoid congestion. "The trouble is
there are not enough who realize the
importance of getting through as
soon as possible,' he said.
The complete catalog will probably
be ready some time in March.
TRYOUTS BEING HELD FOR
NEW CHINESE SPOTLIGHT
Plans are under way for the pro-

duction of a "Chinese Spotlight" on
Jan. 20, the proceeds of which will
go to the fund being raised by the
Chinese Students' club for relief work
in China. The program twill include
several Chinese acts and American
talent. Tryouts are being held at the
present time.

Michigan Quintet Shows Class
Defeats Handed Fives
of South

MAIZE AND BLUE DEFENSEe
FEATURE OF ALL GAMES
Playing and winning six games, the1
Christmas vacation trip taken by the 1
Varsity basketball squad seems toE
predict an excellent season for Coachr
Mather and his charges. The Maize=
and Blue team played the pick of theE
Southern independent quintets, and
showed to excellent advantage againste
all opponents. Only one game, that
with the Memphis Y, where the score
was 14 to 11, was not taken by a safe
margin.
Michigan Defense Good
The feature of the trip from a Mich-
igan standpoint was the splendid
work of the Varsity defense, which
allowed only one team, the Louisville
Y. M. H. A., to score more than three
field goals. The Nashville Ramblers,
considered the best in the South, was
able to gather but two field counters
in each of the two games played.
Vanderbilt scored two and Louisville !
five.
It would be difficult to pick a sin-
gle star from the eight men that made
up the Michigan squad, as all of the]
men played well. The games were
won by the good playing of all the
Imembers of the team, and not by any
one star. Whitlock was the high scor-
er of the team, with Captain Karpus,
Miller and Weiss close behind him.I
Michigan's scoring, the weak point of,
the game for the past few seasons,
seems to be in a fair way to be rem-
edied by the 1921 five.
The following ien made the trip:
Forwards, Captain Karpus, Miller, and
Whitlock; centers, Weiss, and Rea-
son; guards, Williams, Wilson; and
Rea. Rea and Weiss have both been1
shifted from their positions of last.
season, and have both been more than,
satisfactory in the games played thus
far. Rea has gone from forward to
guard, and Weiss from forward to
center.
Games and Scores
The games played on the trip, and
the scores: Michigan 32, Louisville
Y. M. H. A. 18; Michigan 28, Nash-
ville Ramblers 16; Michigan 24, Jones-
boro 16; Michigan 14,Memphis Y 11;
Michigan 28, Nashville Ramblers 11;
Michigan 21, Vanderbilt7.
The entertainment provided for the
members of the team on the trip was
one of the most pleasing features, es-
pecially that of the Kentucky Club of
Michigan, while the men were in
Louisville.
Wisconsin, Jan. 8, opens the Big Ten
season.
WORD RECEIVED OF DEATH OF
J. E. CLARKE,'56, AT HARTFORD
John Emory Clarke, '56, died Mon-
day in Hartford, Conn., according to
word received here yesterday. He was
88 years of age.
He graduated with a bachelor's de-
gree in 1856 and received his master's
degree in 1859. He was a member of
the faculties of the State Normal col-
lege and University from 1856 to
1859. He then studied abroad. He
was professor of mathematics at Yale
university from 1873 to 1901. He serv-
ed in the Civil war with the Fifth
Michigan cavalry, being discharged as
a lieutenant-colonel.

by

Health Service
Issues Warning
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director of
the University Health service, issued
a warning last night requesting all
students to report at once any mani-
festations of illness. "Hiving been
widely scattered throughoutdthe st tes
for the past two weeks students might
easily have contracted diseases which
if not promptly taken care of would
lead to epidemics," said Dr. Forsythe.
The Health service was open one
hour a day during vacation for the
benefit of those students who remain-
ed in Ann Arbor during the holidays
and who desired medical attention. It,
is estimated that 10 students reported
every. day on an average. The same
schedule that existed previous to va-
cation in regard to hours goes into
effect again today.{
BISHOP, LEETEj, INDIANA
ON WESLEYANPROGRAM
GUILD SCHEDULES PROMINENT
SPEAKERS IN SERIES OF
LECTURES

As one of a series of lectures ar-
ranged by the Wesleyan guild for the
rest of this year, an address will be
given by Bishop F. D. Leete of In-
dianapolis on Sunday evening in the1
Methodist church on the subject, "The
Future of America."
A 'rather extensive program has7
been planned by the guild for the re-
mainder of the year. The next ad-a
dress will be given by Bishop Thomas
Nicholson of Chicago on Feb. 27, and
on March 13 D. W. L. Stidger of De-
troit will be the speaker. The only
other address to be given before the1
spring holidays will be one by Dr. F.
F. Shannon of Chicago, who willj
speak on March 20.- /
Between the Easter vacation and;
commencement there will be three lec-
tures on the program, the first of
which will be given on April 24 by
Miss Jessie Rogers of the Henry
Street settlement of New York City.
The last two addresses on the pro-
gram will come on May 8 and 29 and
will be given by Edgar A. Guest of
Detroit and by ex-Senator A. J. Bev-
eridge, respectively.
TO BEGIN COUPON
DISPOSAL TODAY
Method of distribution of tickets for
the Conference basketball games hav
been announced by the athletic office.
In exchange for coupon number 36,
signed, and personally presented at
the desk in the corridor of University
hall, or at the athletic office, a single
admission to two games will be given
The games have been paired as fol-
lows:,1 Wisconsin, Jan. 18, and Iowa,
Jan. 21; Indiana, Jan. 10, and Illinois,
Feb. 26; Ohio, Jan. 15, and Purdue,
Feb. 28.
The choice of any pair of these
tickets will be given as long as they
last, the number available being 2200
for any one game, due to a ruling of
the Board of Regents.
.The pairs of these games, as men-
tioned above, will not be split.
Tickets will be given out from 9 to
12 o'clock in the morning and from
1:30 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon,
beginning this morning. The distribu-
tion will continue until Saturday
morning, provided -the demand for
tickets does not take them all before
that time.

PLANS SET FORT?
BY PACKERS AH
NOT ACCEPTIE
PROPOSALS FOR DIVESTMEN
STOCKYARD INTERESTS
ARE REJECTED

MUST PRESENT NE'
WITHIN THIRTY

I

Justice Stoffard of District Supr
Court Hands- Out FDecisio
" Against "Big FiTVe
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 4.-All propo
thus far advanced by the "Big F
meat packers for divesting themse
of their stock yards' interest were
jected today by Justice Stoffard in
district supreme court. The comj
ies were given 30 days in whih
submit new plans.
' At the same time the court w
ed that unless the defendants pro
ed plans that would meet regq
ments. outlined, it would "feel ol
ed' to appoint officers to take tit
all the .stock of the stock yardi
question and to hold the ame,
jept to the order of the court i
suitable agreements can be mad
have it disposed of in accordance i
the terms and interests of the de
of the court, agreed upon between
packers and the government i
than a year ago." In a formal 81
ment regarding the court's deci
the Department of Justice i
preted as meaning "that if the p
ers did not divorce themselves f
the, stock yards, the court would i
for them." s ,
Justice Stoffard said that "to f
itate future progress it is consid
best to state here that the court
not see its way to approve any
for the consolidation of the y
whether by a holding company or
erwise."
Such a plan had been submitte
Swift and Armour, which comp
had proposed that a holding comr
be organized by F. H. Frince
company, Boston bankers. The
ernment opposed this plan.
"Any. plan to be acceptable,"
tinned the opinion, "must provid
an early and complete divestmen
the defendants of all the obno
holdings."
BIOLOGISTS HOLD LUNCHEO
DEC. 29 AT CHICAGO1Ea
Twenty-seven at Roll Call; Se
Addresses on Program for
Meeting
Gathering from all parts of the
ited States, men and women who
attended the University of1Mi
biological station at Douglas
held a luncheon, Dec. 29, in the I
Del Prado, Chicago. A roll call,
taken and 27 people responded, t
their present occupation and
they had accomplished since the3
left the station.
Among those appearing on the
gram were: Prof. Ray Pool, b
ical director at the University'"O1
braska, who was a member of the
at Douglas Lake in 1910; Dr. r
Gleason, assistant Airector of the
York botanical gardens, who wa
sistant director of the biological
tion in 1913 and 1914, and diret
1914; Prof. 0. C. Glaser, Amher
rector of the station in 1916; an
G. R. LaRue, present directoi
Douglas Lake.
UNOFFICIAL REPORTS CAUSI
FRENCH GOVERNMENT CON(

University Offers $500 Reward In
Attempt To Check Campus B lazes

Triest, Jan. 4.-Gabriel D'Annunzio Anyone desiring to take part in
will be the last man of his expedi- the show who has not been in touch
tionary force to leave Fiume, it was with the committee should leave a
announced today. Evacuation of his note at the Michigan Union lobby
forces will commence tomorrow and desk tody containing the following in-
will last several days. Present con- formation: Name,, address, phone
ditions in the city are miserable, due number, eligibility, description of the
to a lack of food. Relief has been proposed act. This should be address-
asked of the leaders of the blockading ed to the "Chinese Spotlight," care of
'forces. L. E. Frost, '21E,

With the hope that student aid may
be instrumental in locating the guilty
party, a reward .of $500 has been of-'
fered by the University to the person
or persons furnishing information
that may result in the capture and
conviction of the person causing the
recent incendiary fires in the buildings
of the University.
The numerous blazes discovered
recently within University buildings
are, in the opinion of University offic-
ials, the world of a fire maniac, who
is likely to operate again, and who re-
lies upon the large number of stud-

ents to conceal his movements. Be-
lieving that students may help to;
catch the disturber the matter has
been brought to their attention and a
reward offered.
Seven fires in all have been discov-
ered in University hall and wings, the
Museum, and West hall. No serious
damage has resulted with the excep-
tion of a fire in the classroom in the
north wing of University hall. Owing
'to the fact that the fires have been
discovered some time after they were
set 'University officials have been un-
able to catch the originator at work.

Paris,Jan. 4.-The French gov
ment was concerned over unof
advices telling of the concentratk
six new divisions of the Russian
shevik on the frontier of Bessar
and along . the Dinester river.
reports indicate that Moscow is
paring an attack for the purpos
trying to regain the province of
sarabia.'
The Associated Press was infor
at the Roumanian legation at P
that the Bolshevik menace, whil
ways at the door of Rbumania,
more acute today than for sev
months past. The legation had
confirmation of reports that the
manian king had signed a de
calling several classes to the. c

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