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December 19, 1920 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, D]

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, 13

_ _ i a

'LASHES FROM THE
EIN ANN ARBOR THIS WEEK
S CR EEN AND S TAGE

(By Edwin R Meiss)
Once to every man comes the oppor-
tunity to change his habitual line for
one that is more interesting. And at
last the wrtter has found his bluebird,
for today this column may treat with
equal good taste either upon the qual-
ity of photoplays or upon the retaining
capacity of sieves. For, the past is
dead, and the future, for this column,
three weeks hence.
But it is the privilege of a critic to
write. And if for no other reason,
force of habit leads his pen into the
open door of a picture show. Every
picture show has an audience; it must
have that in order not to be turned
into a garage. Therefore, a few words
concerning an important adjunct to
the screen art.
There are two kinds of audiences,-
Regular and Ann Arbor. The differ-
ence lies in the fact that one thinks
while the other thinks and acts.
The even-tempered person (always
grouchy) who continually utters dis-
pararing remarks, and the light-heart-
ed chap who spoils every death scene;
the irreverent young man who horse-
laughs at hoopskirt modesty, and the
imaginative youth (way ahead of the
picture) who whistles expectantly at
a less moral exhibition; all these are
the despair of conscientious Ann Arbor
mov-ie-goers, and the spice of life to
students and outsiders.
There are, however, two other inter-
esting characters which fare equally
obvious in both types of audience, and
equally annoying. There are two. 1.
The nimble-jawed young lady who puts
the chewing gum under her seat; and
2, the little kid who scrapes it off. The
conversation of the former would not
be proper here, but that of the latter
is always of lively enjoyment, espe-
cially when you are seated in the row
ahead. The following is customary:'
"Mama, what's 'at man doin',
mama ?"
"Just , scolding the other man,
Willie."
"Why? What did 'e do, mama?"

"He stole the man's girl away. But
please stay in your seat, Willie, and
don't snap your fingernails in that
man's hair."
"Oh, look! Hurrah, he shot his gun
What does 'at say, mama? Mama
what does 'at say?"
"It says he killed the man, Willie."
'Which man?''
"The other man. The one who stole
his girl."
"But he didn't really kill him, did
he, mama?"
"No,' of course not, sonnie, that's
just in the picture."
"But look, mama, they're takin' him
to jail. Why do they take him to jail
if he didn't really kill the man?"
"But he did kill him in the picture."
"But don't they know it's just a
picture?"
"Willie, don't talk nonsense."
"What does 'at say, mama? mama?
mama?"
"Willie, do be quiet, and quit pick-
ing the feathers out of that lady's
hat."
"But what does 'at say, mama?"
"Be quiet and I'll read it to you. 'As
Aurora gradually ascended in her
golden chariot-"
"But what does 'at mean, mama? I
don't see any charriutt."
"I know, son, that means when the
sun comes up."
"Well, mama, why don't they say
what they mean?"
"Willie, if you don't get right back
on that seat this instant and keep still
the rest of the picture I'll never bring
you with me again."'
"But mama, I can't see there."
"All right, we'll go home. Come
on."
"Aaaaw ma, I don'wanna go home."
"Very well, then; sit up there and
be quiet."
"But mama-if I'm real good, mama,
-will you bring me again next week?",
"Yes, if you're real, real good."
"All right, mama-but what's 'at
man doin'?"

HU6E COMMITTEE
AFTER POOLFUNO5
(Continued from Page One)
men pledged to raise this amount, the
average per man must be almost $30.
This of course doesn't mean that when
a solicitor gets his $30 he should
spend the rest of his vacation in
thinking what a whirlwind he is.
Somebody is going to have hard luck,
somebody is going to find it impos-
sible to raise his share. So every man
that is working must get the limit;
there must be enough of the longs to
cover the shorts, and this spirit should
be general.
To encourage $100 donations, the
Union has decided to make a special
offer to alumni who are not Union life
members. Such an alumnus will be
granted a life membership, if he de-
sires it, on making a contribution of
$100 or more to the pool fund.
Installment Plan
In case he cannot make cash pay-
ment, installments of $20 per year
will be accepted. Life membership
cards may be obtained at the cage in
the Union lobby where the men run-
ning the drive are stationed to answer
Read The Daily for Campus News.

any questions or to give any assist-j before resulted in the Union building. ber by having their work result in
ance the solicitors may need. Men now in the University can show completion of the pool. When shall
The work of the classes that went themselves of the same Michigan cali- the Union let the contract?

NOR

TODAY AND
TOMORROW
SHOWS START
2-3:30;7--8:30
TALMADGE

"Y es oer No"
A "FIRST NATIONAL" ATTRACTION
HANK MANN IN "A GUM RIOT"

J
I -

W

If

b

E

Sleep Anyplace ff i,
Eat at Rex'9s
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard

ut

Best

Wishes for

I-

2:

:|::|||

A

MERRY

CHRISTMAS

NOTICE OF INTEREST TO
THEATRE-GOERS

In the future, the Orpheum Theatre
will return to Ann Arbor for a sec-
ond showing the pictures of the fol-
lowing producers:
First National Attractions, with
such stars as Norma and Constance
Taliadge, Charles Ray, Lionel Bar-
rymore, and Katherine MacDonald,
"the American Beauty," as' well as
such producers and authors as Mar-
shall Neilan, King Vidor, and James
Oliver Curwvood.
Metro Pictures, with stars equally
as well known, Bert Lytell, Viola
Dana, Slay Allison, Alice Lake, and
last but not least, the great Nazim-
ova. Metro, too, has well-known
authors writing for them. Jack Lon-
don, for instance, and the great Span-
ish writer, Ibanez.
Goldwyn Pictures present many
popular stars, Tom Moore, Madge
Kennedy, Jack Pickford, Mable Nor-
mand, and Will Rogers. Goldwyn
Eminent Authors' productions are
pictures of the stories by tex Beach,
Mary Roherts Rtinehart, Gouverneuir

AND

A

HAPPY

NEW

YEAR

MAY THE OLD HOME TOWN
NEVER L O O K SO GOOD AS
ON THIS CHRISTMAS NIGHT
HERE'S TO YOU
MEN OF MICHIGAN!

p

°a.,

GARRIG K

I

Cordially

Yours,

1

WAGENHALS & KEMPER

WUERTH

& ORPHEUM THEATRES

PRESENT

The Sensational Mystery Play

Morris and others.
The Admission Prices of the Or-
pheum are, and always will be, re-
gardless of the production-Evenings
and Saturday and Sunday Matinees,
Adults 2ke, Children 10c. All otheri
Matinees, Adults 15c, Children 10c.
Very truly yours,
THE ORPHEUX THEATRE.

IUA

tTHE

BAT "

- p

BY

SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY

UEKTH

STANDARD PRICE
ADULTS-30c
CHILDREN-IOc

Mary Roberts Rinehart,
and Avery Hopwood

A STORY OF RED-BLOODED MEN OF THE GREAT NORTHWEST

With A

BRILLIANT CAST

I ,;;

A story of the Hunter and the
Hunted, in a Land where only

I

SCHUBERT
ETROIT

the Strong survive.

Th
Count
a wo
price.
k ~t/

ie glamor of the Snow
try where life is cheap, but
man's love is held without

I;

Mr. LEW FIELDS

PRESENTS

I_

A Musical Novelty In

OVERTURE..........
........."RAYMOND"

FOX NEWS

2 Acts and 7

Scenes

'I

"PoorLittle Ritz Girl"

BY A. THOMAS

/ 2!I

Played by

r

I

WITH

ANDREW TOMBES
LULU McCONNELL
FREDERIC SANTLE Y

THE WUERTH ORCHESTRA

Clarinet......N. Falcone, Director
Violin ................L. Falcone
Flute ...............Mrs. Snyder
Cornet..................Corbett
Trombone................. Martin
Drumns.................... Young
Piano .................... Evans

LEWIS J. SELZHICK Prwdt
OUTOF THE SNOW
RALPH INCE PRODUCTION
A story that pictures the northland in all its romantic
glory - of a member of the Royal Northwest Mounted,
who faced death to forget the torments of an aching heart.

HANK MANN

IN

I

AND A

"WHY CHANGE
YOUR MRS?"

"Ritz" Aggregation of Charm

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