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December 17, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press b-lding, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not recessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith. and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion oi the Editor, if .'eft at o mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily c.oes not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the coib munications.
."What's Going-On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor.........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E" McManis
3.1. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood.J. A. Bernstein
*Sunday Editor .......... . .. .......ABentn
Editorials............Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News............................E. P. Loveoy Jr.
Sports................................... .Robert Angell
Women's..Editor .............................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph....... .... .....West Gallogly
Telescope....................................Jack W. Kelly

the work for all he can get out of it in the way of
pleasure and knowledge, and is a loyal, law-abiding
citizen. As evidence that he is loyal, one has only
to consider the thousands of such men who enlisted
in the army and navy at the beginning of the war
and, being already trained, made it possible for the
government to place them on duty in stations im-
mediately. They saved the situation in many cases
by their ability to step in and take hold of the radio
work of the navy department.
Influential men all over the country can be found
among the ranks of the wireless enthusiasts. Hiram
Percy Maxim, the inventor of the Maxim silencer
and a munitions manufacturer, is a radio amateur,
as are also John Hays Hammond Jr., and count-
less lesser lights all over the country. It is such
men as these who have made a number of the most
useful discoveries in the field of radio communica-
tion in years past.
The radio amateur is sufficiently limited in power
and wave length so that his work does not mate-
rially interfere with commercial communication,
and a great deal of credit is due him for helpful
work in times past. To try to put a stop to his
work and to make necessary the confiscation of his
apparatus is certainly an unjust folly.
THE CONVOCATION CALL
President Burton has issued a request that all
students assemble this afternoon in Hill auditor-
ium. This gathering will mark the annual observ-
ance of Convocation, a tradition of the University
which rivals Cap Night in its significance. The
administrative head of the University, in his only
direct communication of the year to the student
body exclusively, will appeal to the men and women
of Michigan for support and co-operation in carry-
ing out his plans and policies, and in realizing the
ideals for which his administration stands. It is
only with this aid from the student body as a unit
that the President can hope to accomplish unham-
pered the ambitions for an even greater and a bet-
ter Michigan.
Attendance at Convocation is not only an impor-
tant opportunity for each student to come into
closer contact with his University, but it is also a
tradition carrying with it a duty which no man or
woman at Michigan should shirk.
The Telescope

i

GRAH

TWO STORES

Open evenings Until Christmas

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

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....

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arborand Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. ., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. mn., and hourly to 9:10 p. mn.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:4S p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e,.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit--5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

' The Most Beautiful and Refined Dancing School
in Ann A rbor.

WUERTH ARCADE

1

V

n

osephine Waldo
Paul' G. Weber
Almena Barlow
Elizabeth Vickery
G. R. Clark
George Reindel
DorothyMonfort
,Harry B. Grundy
FrancesOberholtzer
Robert E. Adams
Norman C.. Damon

Assistants
Byron Darnton
Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace E Elliott
Leo J. Hersl dorfer
L. Armstrong Kern
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
3. A. Bacon
v. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
J. W. Hlume, Jr.

H. E. Howlett
M. A. Klaver
I. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
SBeata Haslky
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Waller

II,

999

TAXI

999

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER....-.....LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising .............. ..................D. P. Joyce
Classifieds..............................+Robt. 0. Kerr
Publication........... ... .... . ........... . .F. M. HeIath
Accounts........... ......................-.E. R. Priebs
Circulation ....................-....... .-V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
I I ni l Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

DECE L BER
S X T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 39 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, -efinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

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Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issueof The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1920.
Night Editor-THOMAS H. ADAMS.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Michigan was the first university to adopt the
diploma system of entrance from high school, in
I870, thus displacing the older method of entrance
by examination which is still being employed by a
few of the Eastern universities.
DRAMATIC CO-OPERATION
Anyone who is at all acquainted with the dra-
matic situation here knows that there ,are a large
number of organizations on our campus which aim
primarily at play-production. For women exclu-
sively there is Masques; the Comedy club and the
Classical club take up somewhat differing phases
of the drama; and other organizations put on a
play now and then and let it go at that.
There are a great many things to be said in favor
of every one of the dramatic organizations on the
campus for the work of each is highly commenda-
ble and each aims at a slightly different phase of the
ideal toward which alt are working. But the diffi-
culty is that as a result of the number of such
groups and the amount of time and talent required
by each one for each play produced, not only do
none gain the standing which their work warrants,
but the dramatic interest and development of the
student body as a whole is somewhat dampened.
There seems to be, moreover, a tendency on the
part of the numerous organizations to work for
their own interests, for the notoriety which the'pro-
duction of their play will bring, and to take a crack
now and then at the other club which is also trying
- to do some work \xin this line. Being hindered in
our aspirations toward a development of the better
dramatic art by the lack of a campus theater, we
are, of course, dependent on these various clubs and
their work and unless they have co-operation we
cannot expect as full an upbuilding of the pure
drama as might be hoped for.
Competition is a good thing but competition in
amateur dramatics without co-operation is a hin-
drance. If we are to have the kind of instruction
and production here that other universities have
and that Michigan surely needs, we must begin by
a more unified aim and more of a spirit of mutual
help among the campus dramatic organizations.
The present time, when casts are being picked and
rehearsals for the various plays are beginning, is
the right moment for that co-operation and mutual
encouragement and boosting to start its function-
ing.
WHY KILL AMATEUR RADIO?
About every so often someone in congress con-
ceives the idea of bringing up a bill the intention of
which is to squelch the radio amateur, and just so
often is the amateur body of operators in the United
States compelled to rise up in arms and defend its
rights. The latest action of this sort is the Poin-
dexter bill, which provides for a "National Radio
commission," part of whose duty it shall be to put
out of business all stations "not necessary for the
general good of the public service," meaning ama-
teurs.
Whether he be a business man or a high school
or college student, the experimenter in radio is in

MIMEOGRAPHING
CIRCULAR LETTERS
POST CARDS
24 - HOUR SERVICE
Leave Orders at
Either of
Wahr's Bookstores
or Edwards Bros.

MADISON AND WABASH3

/ CHICAGO

FINAL STANDING
No. of Contribs
Men ..........2439

Points
2439'

FOR IMMEDIATE CLEARANCE
MEN'S POLO SHIRTS

Women........ 590 1770
The above figures tell the story of how the slum-
bering manhood'of Michigan, with ignominious de-
feat staring it in the face, suddenly awakened to
the call of duty and how well it responded to its
clarion appeal. All day Thursday the avalanche of
letters poured into our office, and it was only by
an almost superhuman effort that the judges were
able to tabulate the final result before the paper
went to press.
It is with mingled pride and sorrow that we an-
nounce the final result of the Contest. We are justly
proud of the fact that once more our sex has
clearly demonstrated its unquestioned right to wear
the wreath 9f Superior Wit which has adorned the
classic brow of the male all through the ages.
But our pride in the achievement of our sex is
tinged with sorrow that such a heroic and splen-
di fight against odds as the women put up, should
go for naught. F~or spirit such as they exhibited
can never die; the unbreakable spirit which they
evinced in the face of overwhelming odds has for-
ever enshrined them in the hearts of Michigan men.
In the words of the Good Book and of the Ec. I
textbook, "broadly speaking, they fit the -good
fight," and no man dare ask more of any one.
A wonderful eleventh hour rally by the women
who sent their offerings in a handsome box to be
sacrificed on the altar of wit was one of the most
touching incidents of the whole Contest. But even
this final flicker of their undying spirit failed to
stem the tide and the women were forced to bow
to a superior foe.
Angelena writes in to say that the reason a man
is said to "pine" for a woman is that pine is the
softest wood there is.
Dear Noah:
Is there any connecting link between the animal
and the vegetable kingdom? G. Allijust.
Yes, certainly -hash.

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REDUCED TO $3.00
(NO TAX)

Made from fine quality Oxford with button down collar attached
Sizes 132 to 16.

After

MEN'S PURE SILK NECKWEAR

TO CLOSE AT

$1.00 EACH

Classes

I

SAMPLES NOW BEING SHOWN BY OUR REPRESENTATIVE

Movies

MR. RAYMOND ZOLLO

AT

324 SOUTH STATE STREET
ABOVE CALKINS-FLETCHER DRUG STORE

Parties

I'

Chat

I

Rest

cme Liberty Cleaners & Pressers
523 E. Liberty Street
SUITS
PRESSED

Be

Refreshed

Phone 2571-W

"Failed in Ec., flunked in French,"
I heard him softly hiss.
"How I'd like to catch the man
Who said 'Ignorance is Bliss.'"

1

A REAL

at

Yes, Angelena, you are quite right when you as-
all pictures, telephone numbers, etc., which are en-
sume that our mail is strictly confidential and that
closed in letters are regarded as such.
Furthermore, Ang., we hope you don't let the re-
sult of the Contest dishearten you because we've
enjoyed your column very much lately.
We agree with another eminent authority in be-
lieving. that metaphysics is two men in a dark room
looking for a black hat which is not there.
Famous Closing Lines
"He has the edge on me," murmured the pugi-
list as the barber started shaving him.
NOAH COUNT.

.Xmas

Dance

AT

D E

X

I

TER

9 N
709 NORTH UNIVERSITY

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS
SPECIALTIES
SANTA CLAUS WILL GREET YOU ALL
HATS & WHISTLES FOR EVERY ONE
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22
PHIL DIAMOND
AND HIS FIRST ORCHESTRA

Ip

I OWN I

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