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December 17, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
LITTLE CHIANGE IN TER-
PERATURE TODAY

r 5k iOa

D augx

AUSSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 63. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

6QYERNOR ALLEN
UPHOLDS IDEA OF
INDUSTRIAL COURT'

GIVES DESCRIPTION OF
LABOR SITUATION
KANSAS

SERIOUS
IN

GOMPERS COULD HAV
SITUATION SAYS
SWIMMING IS-
-One of the fipest exercises
known;
Recognized as a Varity
sport in colleges throughout the
country;
--Kept from the students of
the University of Michigan be-
cause we have not the facilities
either for practice or competi-
tion; and
-Within a few months of
realization at Michigan if we
put ; across the campaign, this
vacation, to secure alumni funds
for the completion of the mag-
nificent Union pool.
Is it worth the effort?

E IMPROVED LABOR
ALLEN IN INTERVIEW
"If Samuel Gompprs had spent his
time and brain power to bring peace
and prosperity to labor instead of
emphasizing unnatural difficulties, all
of us, with the single exception of
Samuel Gompers, would be better off,"
was a parting estimation by Governor
Henry J. Allen given to a Daily re-
porter before leaving Ann Arbor last
night. In his address the governor
made several caustic references tol
the notorious labor leader, but this
interview estimation was the hard-1
est of all.
"Although farmers in- Kansas are
hard up, the situation does not ap-
proach disaster," was the governor's
comment on the condition of the mid-
(Ila wt fnmr cirn rinn f thnir

STUDENT BODY TO
HEAR BURTON AT
EXERCISES TOAY

CONVOCATION IS ELEVENTII
KIND; PROCESSION TO BE
OMITTED

OF

THERE ARE-
Only four more Days left for
You to pledge part of your Time
and lots of your Energy to-
wards the completion of the
Swimming Fool.
Seventeen hundred Loyal
Michigan Men have already vol-
unteered their Services, more
will volunteer today. . Every
Man who is able to walk and
talk should sign the little yel-
low Card before he leaves for
Home.
Michigan Men h ave always
been Known for their Willing-
ness to Serve, not Self, but their
University, and the Union is a
Part of the University.
What are You going to do?
BE OF SERVICES

ANSWERS QUESTIONS
ASKED BY AUDIENCE
Has Made Constructive Contribution
to Capital-Labor Problem, Says
President Burton
"If the government may with jus-
tice, prescribe relations between hus-
hand and wife, and parent and child,
don't you think that the government
can establish justice between the lab-
orer and employer? That's all there
is to it." Such was the justification
given by Gov. Henry J. Allen, of Kan-
sas, for the court of industrial rela-
tions in his address on "The Kansas
Industrial Situation," last night at
Hill auditorium.
Describing the serious situation in
his'state on account of the coal strike
last fall, he explained the need of a
court and how legislation was passed
which established it. He gave in de-
tail the operation of the court, and its
success.
All But Two Accepted
"The law has been on the statute
books for nine months and has passed
the first great court test and the pub-
lic test. We have had the help of the
conservative element of union labor
In nine months last year we had 102
strikes, while this year only 20 decis-
ions have been made by the court,
and 16 of them were brought into the
court by labor. Of these all but two
were accepted without appeal."
"The right to work is as sacred as
the right to loaf," Governor Allen said
in explaining that the law protected
labor which really wanted to work
when the union opposed it. "All lab-
or needs. is the restoration of its own
ideal, and the passing of leadership
into the hands of the constructive and
conservative elements."
Answers Questions
Answering questions from the audi-
ence at the close of the formal ad-
dress, he made clear many points
as to the enforcement, appointment of
members of the board, and other in-
formation related to the practical ap-
plication of the principle of the court.
President Marion L. Burton, in in-
troducing Governor Allen said, "The
governor has made a constructive
contribution to the solution of the
capital and labor problem." The ad-
dress was the fourth on the Oratorical
association series.
Poor Tots Attend
Christmas Party
More than 150 poor tots attended
the Christmas party yesterday after-
noon at Lane hall. From the hospi-
tals every child who was able to leave
his bed was there - very much
there- and the children of the poor
families of the city celebrated
Christmas there, too. For many of
the youngsters this was the begin-
ning and end of Christmas, for their
parents are not able to do much in
the way of playing Santa Claus.
Billie, the hunchback from the
Homoeopathic hospital, had the time
of his life, even if he did have to
make the trip in a wheel chair. And
Jimmy, the same Jimmy who cried for
the woolly sheep, liked it until they
shot off a flash light and that fright-
ened him.
Huge candy canes and ice cream
cones were served to the children
and they were entertained by music,
story telling, and a playlet by the
Women's league.
Contributions to the poor children's
fund totaled $210. Additional donors

are Joyce McCurdy, and Sadie Har-
wick. This money' will be used to
purchase clothing for needy children.
Old clothing is needed by the char-
itable organizations, and students are
requested to save what they have in
this line and notify Lewis Reimann at
Lane hall. Fraternities having Christ-
mas tree parties are asked to have
the trinkets for the poor children of
the city. A collection of these arti-
(Continued on Page Eight)

PRESIDENT TO SPEAK ON
UNIVERSITY CONDITIONS
All Classes to Be Dismissed During
Exercise; Large Attendance
Expected

I

__

i

ALREDMAY CHOSEN
Lichtenberg, iHume, Stauffer, and
Hummer Named as
AssistantsF
McKEAN AND FORBES ELECTED
OFFICERS OF ATHLETIC BOARD
Alfred May, '22E, was elected foot-
ball manager for next season at a
meeting of the Board in Control of
Athletics held last night.
Robert McKean, '21, was chosen
president of the board of directors,
and Daid Forbe; '21, secretary and
treasurer. ° Assistant football mana-
gers named -were William Lichten-
ebrg, '23, James Hume, '23, Arthur
Stauffer,.'22E, and Charles Hummer,
'23. David Forbes was re-elected in-
ter-scholastic manager.
Plans were discussed for the inter-
scholastic athletic meets and it was
decided to have the state high school
basketball tournament in the latter
part of February, while the track meet
will be held in May.
SCHOOL CHILDREN HOLD
CHISTMAS CAROL SING
SEVERAL HUNDRED TAKE PART
IN SECOND ANNUAL
LEETING
Several hundred Ann Arbor school
children took part in the second an-
nual Christmas carol sing yesterday
afternoon at Hill auditorium. Mr.
George Oscar Brown was supervisor
of the sing and Miss Lou M. Allen act-
ed as assistant supervisor, while Prof.
Earl V. Moore was organist. The Un
iversity School of Music and the Ann
Arbor public schools co-operated in
providing the program.
Most of the songs were old folk
songs sung in the old countries from
almost immemorial times. Others
were the popular modern Christmas
hymns. Among the old folk songs
were "The First Noel," sung by the
whole chorus; "O Come Little Child-
ren," by the third grade children;
the Welsh melody "Deck the Hall,"
by the chorus; the old French "Cradle
Song," by the seventh and eighth
grade children; and "From the Starry
Heavens High," by the fifth and sixth
grade children. Other carols of more
recent origin, such as "It Came Upon
a Midnight Clear," "Silent Night,"
and "Hark the Herald Angels Sing,"
were also sung. A plan is going for-
ward to revive the ancient custom of
singing Christmas carols on Christ-
mas even in Ann Arbor, by having
groups of children meet together and
sing in their various neighborhoods.

ce west armers, since prices o ieir
products have. had such a great drop. Characterized by a short program
"The subject is entitled to the gravest and the absence of the usual acade-
concern by congress, and if the gov- mic parade of former years, the elev-
ernment can do anything by liberaliz- enth annual All-University Student
eminnt an o aythig b lieraiz-Convocation will be held in Hill aud-
ing credit, I think it should be done. Cnoat4n olock his afternoon.
Unfortunately for the farmer, he be- torium at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon-
gan to enjoy profitsfrom the war lat- The outstanding feature of the Pon-
er, he was more severely regulated, vocation will be the address by Pres-
and he is the first to experience re- ident Marion L. Burton.
duction." His address is intended primarily
"Do you have- a department of for students, and for tihs reason fac-
journalism at Michigan?" he asked ulty members have been asked not to
Upon receiving an affirmative ans- attend the services in order that as
wer he said: "Sentiment has changed many students as possible may obtain
among newspapermen as to the rela-Inthis official caparys
tive value of a department of journal- head of the University, President
ive vale ofs TBurton desires to bring before them
ism in colleges. The old-fashioned

editor used to sneer at the college
trained journalist. Now, however, it
is realized that the best journalist is
the one who has taken courses in col-
lege, together with subjects of a spec-
ial nature."
POOHL FUND GETS $95
FROM 1920 SOPH 'PROM

4

AIMOUNT
TAX

RECEIVED FROM WAR
REFUND DONATED
TO UNION

Ninety-five dollars was added to
the swimming pool fund yesterday
when the war tax refund from last
year's sophomore prom was donated
to the Union. This action was taken
by the prom committee, of which 3
Douglas Dow, '22E, is chairman.
Five sectional clubs met yesterday
and discussed methods of putting the
drive over during the vacation. These
clubs included the men from Wash-
ington, D. C., Jackson, Battle Creek,
Chicago, St. Louis, and Pontiac. Chair-
men elected for the last four cities
were: Norman Kolb, '23E, Edward
Martin, '24, Edward Grayson, '23, and
Murray VonWagoner, '21E.
Pledges to date number 1,693 for a
total of $31,238.
Three sectional club meetings have
been called for 4 o'clock today at the
Union, South Bend, Ind., men meet-
ing -in room 306, Kalamazoo men in
room 304, and Niagara Falls, N. Y.,
men in room 308.

information as to the condition of the
University of particular importance
at this time.
To Suspend Classes
It was announced yesterday that all
University exercises will be suspend-
ed during the time, of the convoca-
tion. This will give every student
an opportunity to hear President Bur-
ton's message.
The academic procession, a feature
of former convocations, was held this
year on the day of the inauguratioi
of President Burton, and the lateness
of the season makes it impossible to
attempt anything of this nature now.
The customary time for convocation
(Continued on Page Eight)
Xmas Gargoyle To
e On Sale Today
Enclosed in a cover entitled "A
Gift - That's All," depicting the maid
beneath the mistletoe, drawn by Lee
Boyd, '23L, the Christmas number of
Gargoyle makes its appearance on the
campus this morning. The cartoons
and jokes all have the Yuletide
trend, especial prominence being plac-
ed on gifts.
Noteworthy among the art contri-
butions is a double page cartoon by
W. W. Gower, '23, a frontispiece by
Carl Hubach, '22, and several other
smaller drawings.
A feature of the issue will be pic-
tures .of foreign lands, including the
South Sea islands and Princeton,
which is a burlesque on Scott Fitz-
gerald's "This Side of Paradise."

COOQLIDGE BID TO
SIT WITHCAINET
Harding and Vice - President - Elect
Discuss Future Officers
of State
NEW ENGLAND GOVERNOR IS
PLEASED WITH LEAGUE WORK
Marion, Dec. 16. - Vice-President-
elect Coolidge was formally invited
today by President-elect Harding to
sit in the cabinet consultations and
take an active part in shaping the pol-
icies of the coming administration.
The invitation was extended at a
conference here, in which the two
talked over in detail the question of
cabinet appointments and plans for
an association of nations and many
other problems involved in the as-
sumption of executive authority next
March.
Mr. Coolidge indicated that he
would accept gladly such responsi-
bilities as his chief may suggest. The
vice-president-elect declared he was
particularly pleased with the progress
made in the League of Nations con-
ferences and predicted that Mr. Hard-
ing would work out an agreement be-
hind which the American people could
stand united.
The vice-president-elect would not
go into detail about the cabinet ap-
nointments he discussed with Mr.
Harding, but said that a number of
names were mentioned and that the
President-elect had asked him to
make suggestions.
ANl MNNR TO UIV
Jane Manner, who will give a
drama reading at 8 o'clock Saturday
night in Hill auditorium under the
auspices of the Oratorical association,
is a graduate of the University of Cin-
cinnati and the Speech Arts depart-
ment of the College of Music of Cin-
cinnati.
She later succeeded her teacher as
principal of the School of Expression.
of the College of Music. For seven
years she devoted herself to Shake-
spearean interpretation, two of her
engagements being with the Cincin-
nati orchestra in "A Midsummer's
Night Dream." After this came a
time of travel when Miss Manner read
in many large cities east of the Mis-
sissippi. She then went to Europe
for a year's study.
In 1914 she conducted a series of
dramatic readings at the Hotel Plaza
in New York. These proved so pop-
ular that the larger hall of the Wal-
dorf-Astoria had to be secured and
the readings continued through six
seasons.
She has appeared before some of
the best schools in the country, be-
sides the women's clubs of practical-
ly all the large cities.

M I NSTRELSY SHOW I M H M N
B IMRVMN
OER FIRST NISHT
MUSIC ALONE SUFFICIENT TO
GIVE IT FAVORABLE
RECEPTION
BRONSON AND CLARKE
HAVE PROFESSIONAL AIR
Roderick, Alerrieless Also Stand Out
on Program; Rough Spots
Eliminated
(By Hugh W. Hitchcock)
With the rough spots that met with
disfavor on the opening night almost
entirely smoothed over by a process
of re-arrangement and revamping,
the combined musical clubs of the
Union offered in "Minstrelsy" last
night an entertainment that met with
approval from a fairly large audi-
ence.
Music Pleasing
Although the jokes of the minstrels
are rather musty and flat, the fact re-
mains that the music of the produc-
tion alone is sufficient to give it a
favorable reception. Lovers of good
music, light tuneful airs, and synco-
pation as well, are given just enough
of each to make a well balanced pro-
gram.
The professional atmosphere creat-
ed by the setting .of the opening
number in the second part, Bertrand
Bronson, '22, violin, and Gage Clarke,
'22, piano, was amply carried out by
the excellent work of these two. Their
playing was remarkable for students
and each displayed talent in the ren-
dition of well chosen classical num-
bers. The act, which was particu-
larly pleasing, met with warm re-
sponse from an appreciative audi-
ence. Drdla's "Souvenir" gave Bron-
son opportunity to display his excel-
lent technique. Clarke acquitted him-
self well at the piano, his accompani-
ment being unusually good.
Kemp Keena, grad., met with ap-
(Continued on Page Eight)
NEWSPAPER SOCIETY
TAKES NINE JUNIORS
Pi Delta Epsilon, national honorary
journalistic fraternity, took in nine
junior lits in its annual fall initiation.
held yesterday at the Union. Follow-
ing the initiation ceremony a banquet
was held at which LeGrand Gaines,
'21E, Renaud Sherwood, '22, and
Prof. E. R. Sunderland, of the Law
college, were speakers.
Professor Sunderland emphasized,
in his speech, the fact that there were
three prime requisites for the news-
paperman, these being broad knowl-
edge, courage, and knowledge of the
technique of newspaper practice.
Gaines welcomed the initiates and ex-
plained the work of Pi Delta Epsilon,
while Sherwood replied for the new
members.
Those initiated were: C. Maurice
Atkinson, Renaud Sherwood, Thorn-
ton Sargent Jr., Joseph A. Bernstein,
Robert D. Sage, Edward R. Priehs
Jr., Hugh W. Hitchcock, Brewster P.
Campbell, and Thomas H, Adams.
DEC. LAW REVIEW
TO APPEAR TODAY

Featuring the second of a series of
articles on "Constitutional Law in
1919-1920," by Thomas Reed Powell,
of Columbia university, the Michigan
Law Review will appear today.
The article discusses taxation, po-
lice power, and eminent domain, be-
sides citing a number of recent cases.
Among the other articles are "Indi-
rect Revocation and Termination by
Death of Offers," by Jdmes Lewis
Parks, of the University of Missouri
Law school, and the "Law of Oil and
Gas," by James A. Veasey, of Tulsa,
Oklahoma.
In the "Note and Comment"- section
is a criticism of Judge Kenesaw
Landis for accepting the. presidency
of the American league, accuslitg
him of using his position as a judge
to gain pecuniary reward and of pos-
sessing a "dulled sense of proprie-
ty." Other discussions in this sec-
tion are "Municipal Zoning," "Privi-
leged Communication Between Phys-
Ician and Patient," and "Criminal
Liability of Corporations."

i Dea

. Optiona
course in
sultant a
training v
outlined 1
in an ad
the Junio
bly yester
"We ar
block sys
in its pla
tute a rib
tem, the;
culture, c
get it, as
in more
"In the
be multi-
es will b
technical,

nz Cooley Outlines Advantages
Of Five Year Engineering Course
tl election of a five year clear through, so that a man will ar-
engineering,, with the re- rive at the end of his college train-
dvantages which a five year ing with a much broader education.
will give to an engineer, was "There is a tendency all over the
by Dean Mortimer E. Cooley country in the larger engineering col-
dress which he delivered to leges toward a broader curriculum.
r engineers, at their' assem- It is with this view in mind that the
rday morning. faculty of the engineering depart-
e going to do away with the ment has suggested both technical
tem," said Dean Cooley, "and and cultural courses other than those
ice it is proposed to substi- offered by the engineering college."
bon system. In the block sys- As regards to the actual working
student bites off a chunk of out of a five year program, the same
hews it, and hurries to for- degree might be secured at the end
he becomes more engrossed of four years as that now given un-
technical subjects. der the four year regime. The addi-
ribbon system, which will tion of another year might easily be
colored, the cultural cours- made so as to secure a M.S. in con-
e blended with those of the nection with the work required by the
and the colors will run graduate school.

a: .!

ATTH
Saturday, Dec.

[M UNION
18 2:30 to 5:30

ALL

WELCOME

50 cents Dancing
"Nobe" Wetherbee's Two-Piano Orchestra

j

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