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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
eredited in this papery and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postofice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 966; dite al, 2414.
- Communications not to exceed 3o0 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith,: and. notices of events will b published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or maid to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive noconsideraion. No man-
uscript will'be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed ifn the communications.
"What'shGoing On" notices will not be received after S o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE o. BROPHY, JR.
News Editor.............................Chesser M. .Campbell
Nightt Editors-
T. i. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
J. A. Bernstein J. l1. McAanis
B. P. Campbell T. W. Sargent, Jr.
J. . Dakin
Editorials.........Lee woodruff, Robert Sage, C. 11. Murchison
Sports.............................. .........Robert Angell
Assistant News..... .............. ..........E. P. Lovejoy
women's Editor..............................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph ................. .West Gallogly
Assistants
J!sephine Waldo Thomas J. whinery Harry B. Grundy
aul G. Weber R. W. Wrobleski Winefred licthan
Almena Barlow George Reindel Robert D. Sage
Elizabeth Vickery Doroty Monfort Marion Nicholst
G."E Clark Minnie Muskatt rances Oberholtzer
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGE ........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
Advertising.....................................D. P. Joyce
- Credits and Classified Ads....................... W. Rawings
Publication .......................................F. M. I eath
Accounts. ....... ........................... ..L. R. Prihs
Circulation..................................... P. Schneider
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht B. G. Gower Lester W. Millard
Robert 0. Kerr Sigmund Kunstadter V. F. Hillery
The night editors for the week will be: Brewster
Campbell, Monday night; Thornton Sargent, Tues-
day night; Thomas Adams, Wednesday night; John
Dakin, Thursday night; John McManis, Friday
night; and Joseph Bernstein, Saturday night.
Persons wishing to secure information conc rsing news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, wo has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
SUNDAY, OQX0BER 10, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
There ar seven honorary societies at Michigan
as follows: Michigamua, senior interclass; Griffins,
alb-department, interclass; Vulcans, senior engi-
neering; Druids, senior literary; Barristers, senior
law; Sphinx, junior literary ; and Triangles, junior
engineering.
HOUSING THE STUDENT BODY
Few programs 'have been more successfully car-
ried out than that of the University and Michigan
Union housing committees which have co-operated -
in solving'the formidable housing problem that con-
fronted the student body this fall. Called upon to
provide accommodations for what was estimated
as a twenty per cent increase in attendance, these
committees went ahead efficiently and thoroughly
with far-reaching lans to meet the situation.
That rooms were found for all is not the only
result of their efforts. They also succeeded in cur-
tailing the jump in prices which occurred when it
was believed that rooms would be scarce. They
made the Union the central room market, to the
benefit of both students and landladies, and com-
pleted their work by establishing the court of ap-
peal which is to consider rooming house disputes.
Although the exaggerated attendance prophecies
did not wholly raterialize, the committees did their
part so well that there are now morethan two hun-
dred rooms available for late comers.
The committee of appeal- is an important devel-
opment, which promises to minimize disputes be-
tween students and landladies long after building

conditions return to normal and rooms are plen-
tiful at reasonable.prices. Breaches of contract on
the part of landladies, which have caused no small.
part of the indignation expressed this fall, should
be almost entirely eliminated when it is realized that
such contracts will be enforced. Overcharging for
rooms is perhaps the most important field for rem-
edy by the committee, which has a big task be-
fore it.
The students can co-operate at once with the
housing committee by aiding in finding room-mates
for men who are alone in double rooms.
REGISTER FOR THE UNION
Only two-thirds of the rmen in the University
have so far responded to the appeal for registra-
tion at the Union. Carelessness, or misunder-
standing as to the value to Michigan of this regis-
tration, may be the cause; but a brief consideration
of the usefulness of the plan should be sufficient to
,send every man to the desk with his treasury re-
ceipt. Regardless of whether or not he is a life
member, the officials want each student to come in
and fill out a classification card.
The purpose of this registration is to provide an
estimate of the amount of material obtainable upon.
the campus for various enterprises, so that when a
show is started or a campaign initiated, the officials
will know exactly where to look for publicity
agents, for managers, musicians, artists, and for
the many other personnel requirements of a suc-
cessful student undertaking. In choosing officers

and committeemen, the registration cards are con-
sulted and the selections made therefrom.
Las year fifteen hundred positions were filled
through these cards. Let's make them just as use-
ful in 1920-I92I.
THE SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT
Features and photographs have become two
of the most important departments of the modern
newspaper. Believing that Michigan had the jour-
nalistic talent to provide both, and the ability to
get out a Sunday supplement along the lines of
metropolitan editions, last year's Daily nianage-
ment began the publishing of a special section ev-
ery week devoted purely to the unusual, the instruc-
tive, the interesting, and the beautiful. University
art, drama, literature all had their place in the sup-
plement, along with special humor sections, photo-
graph layouts, authoritative "dope" stories, worth-
while interviews, and special articles.
The plan was a success beyond the imagination
of those who inaugurated it. Other college papers,
perceiving the opportunities in the supplement idea,
published similar extra sections. This year The
Daily hopes to make its Sunday special worthy of
the publications talent of a great University, and
will do its best to equal or if possible exceed the
record of excellence set last year.
BACK OFF!
It is an obvious though none the less instructive
fact that when, your face is too close to a mirror,
the proper perspective is lacking.
In the business of learning, the first of a new
college year is an admirable time to "back off" and
take a look at the advances made, get a better view
of our exact destination.
Few great men have become so through freaks
of fortune. The vastmajority of the "go getters,"
of people who do big things, of the best intellects,
accomplish their aims by first knowing exactly what
they wish to accomplish, and then moving in a con-
tinued course toward that end.
A new semester offers this opportunity of a gen-
eral sizing up of the situation, a mental "backing
off" to obtain the proper perspective, a tightening
of the mental girth, and a united physical and men-
tal effort to go after and secure the end we seek.
If our business be to find a vocation which fits
our-makeup, we must make all plans to this end.
Once the destination has been decided upon, we
must see that the staunchest of educational foun-
datiofns is laid, for no specifications as to the height
and weight of the proposed structure which we
will build are obtainable now.
Back off! Let's take a good look at ourselves
and our contemporaries-and then "feed her the
power."
Th e Tele'scope

.....-,

GRAHAM

1- 1 -20466.

TWO STORES
Books and Supplies for dll Colleges at
2ioth Stores

.

Both Ends of Diagonal Walk

ANN( i CE)ENT
Mr. and Miss, Moses announce the
re-opening of their dancing classes for
University men and women in the
Nickels' Arcade Dance Hall. Enroll
Monday or Tuesday evening, 7:15 to
8:15, Oct. 18 and 19. Classes will be
beld for advanced students and be-
giniers. Private lessons by appoint-
ment. Call 1545-W for further inform-
at ion.--Adv.
I.UETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect June 15, 1920
Betweeni
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
LiMited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9:10 P. nn. 1
Limiteds to Jacksou at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. im. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. n.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40-p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
eA

-

- 'a-

Formerly Pop Bancroft
THE SAEE - SAMEEATS
nder Student anagement

C. G. GRUBAUGH & SON, Prop.
COR. MONROE AND OAKLAND
7 J Lunc , Stu

Phone 2647

dent Supplies

I99

ti

TAX 1

X99

K
14
Iwo

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service
enough said
~999

4-

~99

0CTOBE1
S M T W T

I

10
17
24
30

4
11
18
25

S6
19 20
26 27

7
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28

F; S
1 2
8 9
15 16
22 23
29 30

M1en: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear gust as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

-

I

i

"I can't live without you,"
She murmured with a sob.
And her words rang true
For she knew he had a job.

., n
Y
'

In keeping with our last year's policy of being
a patron of art the Telescope will from time to time
give to the world the precious brain children of
some of our campus artists. Accordingly we re-
print below the picture which on its appearance last
year took the campus by storm. "The Crossing of
the Red Sea by the Israelites."
In this picture, as the 'reader can easily see, the
sea has rolled back, the Israelites have already
crossed over and the Egyptians haven't come up
yet.
As a second course at our intellectual feast we
su bmit:
"The Rise and Fall of a Freshman."
(Dedicated to all freshmen who attend the
Union dances)
To the glittering lights of Revel,
Flippant songs of praise he sang;
For this gay youth had never been
To the Loving Land of Whang-
Where the saxophones play viciously,
Yoodle high, then grunt and wheeze,
Where the sensuous, love-me odor
Of Djer-Kiss lades the breeze.
Where no hunch-backed, pig-eyed fluke
Can be such a beastly bore,
But some sweet thing will answer "yes"
And prance with him 'round the floor.
Fate has left him, now a senior,
Memories with soulful tang;
For this gay youth was far too fond
Of the Loving Land of Whang!
Dear Noah:
I intend going to the Martha Cook formal and
would like to know whether it is proper to wear
an overcoat over evening clothes.
ANXIOUS.
Sorry, but we are unable to answer this ques-
tion since we have never been lucky enough to pos-
sess a winter overcoat and evening clothes at one
and the same time.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, a little shaver," he muttered as he gazed at
the short barber.
NOAH COUNT.

Modern Motive Might
MffOUNTAINS, miles and minutes give
way before electricity, the magic mo-
tive power. Properly applied, it drives giant
locomotives across the continental divide,
tows ocean liners through the Panama Canal,
or propels huge ships.
Through good light, safe signals,and illumin
ated highways, it is making travel better and
safer and also is increasing the usefulness of
transportation methods on land, sea or in
the air.
In short, electricity is revolutionizing trans-
portation, making it quicker, safer, more eco-
nomical and reliable in all sorts of weather.
And back of this developnent in electric
transportation, in generating and transmit-
ting apparatus as well as motive mechan-
isms, are the co-ordinated scientific, engi-
neering and manufacturing resources of the
General Electric Company, working to the
end that electricity may better
serve mankind.
w

£

l

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