100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SECTION
ONE

OPW
4AW
AAfisr4t ttu

4]3 1!3
Ott

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
PAY IAD NIC1T 1 lRI
SERVICE

1 F

VOL. XXXI. No. 6.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1920

PRICE THREE C

UNION

PLANS

NEW

TAP

Roo

WOLVERINES WIN'
FROM SGIENTISTS
FIVE TOUCHDOWNS SCORED BY
YOSTMEN, PLAYING STRAIGHT
FOOTBALL
MICHIGAN ROLLS UP
THIRY-FIVE P O I N T S
Case Held Scoreless 'by Excellent
31aidze and Blue Defense; Steketee
lakes 75-Yard Run
Michigan's Varsity romped through
Case for ,a 35 to 0 victory yesterday'
on Ferry field as a starter for the
1920 season. The visitors had a rath-
er weak eleven so that little real light
was shed on the strength of the Wol-
verines.
Coach Yost used eight men in the
backfield in the course of the after'
noon, three of whom, Ed Usher, Frank
Steketee, and Jack Dunn, showed to
particular advantage. The most sen-
sational run of the game came in the
fourth quarter when Stek broke away
from the pursuing tacklers for 75
yards and a touchdown. In the course
of his journey the big fullback used
the stiff arip effectively and sidestep-
ped well.
Usher Injured,
Ed Usher, who was knocked out and
slightly bunged up in the fourth quar-
ter, was the most consistent gainer
in the, backfield as long as he was in
the game. He picked his holes with
fine judgment and always showed
plenty of fight. Three touchdowns
were made ,by him on plunges through
the line. Jack Dunn ran the team
well and contributed several long end
runs. His^ attempted drop kick from
the 52-yard line only failed by inches.
It had plenty of distance, but the aim
was a trifle Inaccurate.
Of the linemen. Captain Goetz and
Wieman showed to the best advantage.
Goetz demonstrated how, well he fol-
lows the ball by recovering one of
Case's fumbles. Johns replaced Vick
in the fourth quarter and showed him-

Interesting Services Planned 1y
Ann Arbor Churches For Today;
Music Features MVany Programs

INDIANS CONQUEN
IN FOURTH GAME
OF WORLD SERIES

MINNESOTA OUT OF
BIG TEN TT'LI~i

RACE

Many interesting features have been
planned for the various' church serv-
ices today, including many prominent
speakers. Special music is to be fur-
nished at some of the churches.
Service at the Congregational
church begins with an organ prelude
at 10:20. The minister, Rev. Lloyd
Douglas speaks on "the Rediscovery
of America."
At 12:10, the University Student's,
Forum, in charge of T. S. Evans will
be' addressed by Professor Brumm,
the subject being. "the Student and
Orthodoxy." At 6:30x the Congrega-
tional Student's Association will be
addressed by Harry G. Mershon, di-
rector of the education of the church.
Dean Shailer Mathews of the Divin-
ity School of the Jniversity of Chi-
cago will speak at 7:30 o'clock tonight
at the Methodist church' His subject
will be "History and Social Optimism,
-the first lecture on the Wesleyan
Guild course for the year.
Plan Open Meeting
"The Perfect Life" will form the
topic of Rev. John Mason Wells' ser-
mon at 10:30 Sunday morning at the
First Baptist church. Following the
sermon the opening meeting of the
men's class twill be held in the church
auditorium.
At 10:30 Sunday at the Presbyter-
ian church;"the Rev. L. A. Barrett Will
preach on "The Significance of Jesus
Christ." At noon the Bible class meets,
led by Dr. T. M. Iden. At 7:00 Sun-
day evening, Prof. W. D. Henderson,
Tappan lecturer, will speak on "The
Rediscovery of America."
Services at Lane Hall begin at 9:30
with the Men's Bible Class which will
be conducted by Dr. T. M. Iden. The
Student Volunteer Group meets at
4:30 in the "Upper Room," while the
Jewish Student Congregation and
Zionist Society meet at 2:30 in the
auditorium.
Regular services will be held at the
Zion Lutheran Church at 10:30. The
regular Sunday School will be held
at 8:45 at St. Paul's Lutheran church
and church services at 9:45.
At the Church of Christ, Bible
school, with classes especially for Un-
iversity students, will be held at 9:30
this morning. The morning service
will be held at 10:30 and the, subject
LEAGUE PULNS PROAIM
FOR OPENINGRECEPTION
PRESIDENT BURTON TO ADDRESS
WOMEN OF THE
LEAGUE

is announced as "A Sermon by a
Church Elder" given by the pastor of
the church.
Announce Special MUsIc
Special music is included in the
services at =the Trinity Lutheran
church', where the morning serivce
beginsat 10:30.
Reverend Tatlock of the St. An-
drews Episcopal church will preach
at 10:30 on the subject "The Univer-
sity Student and the World," a serv-
ice which is conducted primarily for
students. At 4:30 in the afternoon
Rev. Webb will give an address on
Jesus' Bible Today."'
At the St. Thomas Catholic church
services will be held at 6:00, 7:30 and
10:00 in the morning and at 7:30 in
the evening. Services at the Student'
Chapel for Catholic students will be
held at 7:30 and 10:00 in the morn-
ing.
CONCERT *SERIES
PR OISES WELL
School of Music Announces Program
of Internationally Famed
Artists
METROPOLITAN OPERA SEXTET
LEADS LIST OF ATTRACTIONS
(By L. L. N.)
The programs of this year's con-
certs promise to be the greatest and
most celebrated in the history of Ann
Arbor's musical activities. Never be-
fore have so many artists of national
and international renown been sched-
uled to appear, and it is predicted that
these concerts will mark their greatest
year since they were instituted by Dr.
Albert A. Stanley in 1888.
In the Choral Union series the fol-
lowing nu ibers have been booked:
Oct. 29, Metropolitan Opera sextet,
consisting of Giovanni Martinelli and
Guiseppe Carollo, Tenors; Nina Mor-
gana and Marie Rappod, Sopranos;
Helen Marsh, Contralto; And Thomas
Chalmers, Bass, with Emilio Roxas at
the piano, in a program of excerpts
from Verdi and Puc ini Operas.
Sergei Rachmaninoff, the distin-
guished Russian piano virtuoso and
composer, will appear Nov. 11. His
works and phonograph records are
familiar to piano students and teach-
ers throughout the musical world.
Artist Returns
On Dec. 13, Jan Kubelik, the vio-
linist who electrified America in his
last tour seven years ago, will appear.
Mr. Kubelik'has been absent from this
section for a number of years and his
return is welcomed by many of his
admirers.
The Detroit Symphony orchestra
is scheduled .to appear Jan. 24. Ossip
Gabrilowitsch, the magnetic conduc-
tor of the organization will act as di-
rector as in former concerts.
The Minneapolis Symphony orches-
tra, with Emil Oberhoffer acting as
conductor, will present its program
on Feb. 24th. On March 7th the De-
troit Symphony orchestra will play a
return date. Ossip Gabrilowtsch will
again act as conductor, while Marcia
Van Dresser, soprano, will appear as
the soloist for the evening.
Extra Concerts Planned
In the second annual Extra Concert
series five numbers will be given. The
first of which takes place on Nov. 4th,+
when Albert Spalding, America's Pre-1

mier Violinist, who made such a bril-
liant record in the aviation corps dur-

CLEVELAND TIES BROOKLYN
STRUGGLE FOR 1920
CHAMPIONSHLIP

IN

COVELESKIE STARS
GIVING BUT FIVE

BY
HITS

Evanston, Oct. 9.-Minnesota
Big Ten championship hopes
were dashed today when North-
western entering the contest
against them dazed the Gophers
defense with a varied aerial at-
tack and shatteredatheir offense
at every critical stage, winning
17 to 0.
It was a startling upset for ex-
pert observers of Big Ten Con-
ference football for Minnesota
with her vaunted backfield and a
line equal to any foe was pick-
as one of the strongest contend-
ers for the Conference title. Ex-
cept for the first period and an
occasional spurt in the second
Minnesota was completely out-
classed in every phase of the
7 game with the possible excep-
tion of individual brillancy as
shown in the performance of
Halfback Oss.

I
i

POPULAR DEMAND
EXCEEDS PRESEN-T
WOULD MAKE ADDITION FOU
TIMES LARGER THAN
ORIGINAL
$100,000 NEEDED FOR
ANNOUNCED PLAN

Forest City Gets Edge on Game
Tearing Into Brooklyn in
First Inning

By

self the more
He repeatedly'

aggressive of the two.
broke through the op-

posing forward wall and nailed the
runner.
Dunne and Wilson played three.
quarters at guard, but did not stand
out. Neither is the ideal build for a
guard, Duke not being heavy enough
for his height and.Gob being a little
too light altogether..
Disappointment was felt at the ina-
bility of Michigan to complete passes.
Six were tried, all of them failing.
Goebel had a little hard luck on a
couple of them, and Ed Usher took
two steps after catching another, when
he dropped it. Cappon did not exhib-
it anything startling although he
played a strong defensive game.
Backs Block Well
The blocking of the backfield after
the first quarter was one of the feat-
ures of the game. The long end runs
which were made so often were due
chiefly to this cause.
A crowd of 10,000 turned out to see
the game, one of the largest that ever
attended the opening game of the
season.
First Quarter
Case's kickoff to Nelson was follow-
ed by Michigan plunges that netted
25 yards. After Ipunn's fumble, recov-
ered by Cohn, line plays took the ball
to the Case 8 yard line, where the Sci-
entists braced and stopped the Mich-
igan rush. Case was helpless against
(Continued on Page 4)
Professor Ieighard Attends Dedication
Prof. Jacob E. Reighard, head of the
zoology department is now at Fair-
port, Ia., attending the dedication of
the new United States fish commission
laboratory there. Professor Reighard
attends as the representative' of the
University.

(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Oct. 9-Cleveland massa-
cred Brooklyn this afternoon, winning
5 to 1 and tieing the struggle for the
1920 baseball championship of the un-
iverse. Each team has now won two
games; a~nd the battle will be renew-
ed tomorrow with the American
leaguers the favorites.
The Indians completely swept the
Brooklyn team off their feet today
and brought unlimited Joy to the
thousands of fans who had been
awaiting, with confidence, the awak-
ening of the home team.
Coveleskie Holds Invaders
While the Indians were battering
four of Brooklyn's pitchers to a fraz-
zle, Stanley Coveleskie was holding
the invaders almost helpless in the
grasp of his elusive spitball delivery.
Only 5 hits were collected from his
slants and shoots. In almost every
inning the Robin batters went out in
order. So perfect was his control,
and the defense of his teammates at
his back, that but three Superbas
were left stranded and only one, Jim-
my Johnston, completed the circuit
for a Brooklyn tally.
From the offensive standpoint the
Clevelanders tore into the Nationals
with a rush in the first inning and ac-
tually won the game in that frame.
Two runs were quickly accumulated,
followed by another pair in the third
and the final score went across in the
fifth.
Victory at Psychological Moment
The victory came at the psycholog-
ical moment for the Cleveland club,
which now is thought to have the edge
on Brooklyn. With the games all
even and three games still to be play-
ed on the home grounds, the advan-
tage should rest with the Indians. The
American leaguers have now seen ev-
ery Brooklyn pitcher of class work-
ing against them and the star twirl-
ers of the Robins are no longer a
mystery.
COUNCIL TO MEET FOR
FIRST TIME WEDNESDAY
TWO COMMITTEE HEADS CHOSEN;
CLASS ELECTIONS EARLY
THIS WEEK
The first regular meeting of the Stu-
dent council for the year 1920-21 will
be held next Wednesday night at the
Union. As there is much work to be
done, includifig organization and first
meeting business to be transacted, alli
members are urged by the officers to
be present.I
Announcement of a meeting last1
Wednesday night was through a mis-
understanding and was but one of
the committees.
John C. Cary, '21, has been appoint-
ed by the president of the council to
head class elections, which are to be
held as soon as possible as the Stu-
dents' Directory is already calling for
the names of the class heads. It is
expected that the classes will be called
together the first of this week for nom-
inations of officers.
Fred "Petty, '21, has been made
chairman of the committee to select a
cheer leader and those interested
should communicate with him at once.
Library to Remain Open Sunday
Continuing the same policy as last
year in regard to keeping open on
Sundays the Library will put the read-
ing room and the periodical room at
the disposal of students from 2 to 9
o'clock today.

ENGIEERS GIVEN
NOVEEL TRAINING
Quantity Production Course Introduc-
ed for Benefit of Students; Makes
for Efficiency
WILL MANUFACTURE SPRING
SPREADER FOR AUTOMOBILE
With the intention of training engi-
neering students to work toward
greater efficiency in production, and
also of giving them some what of an
economic rather than a mechanical
view-point of the manufacturing in-
dustry, a new plan of quantity produc-
tion was put into operation yesterday
in the engineering shops,. the system
to be gradually developed and handled
something along the same line as the
system now employed in many large
manufacturing plants.
The plan, as originated and put into
operation by Prof. John Airey, acting
superintendent of the engineering
shops, is to be turned to the exclusive
production of one article, a spring
spreader for motor cars, the purpose
of the system being to train engineers
to become executives, or at least to be
able to handle executive work in pro-
duction and manufacture.
Under the new system, each student,
will make during his shop course, 100
of the articles, As the plan was be-
gun yesterday, two men will consti-
tute a team and will work together.
They will start in on some one opera-
tion in the manufacture of the article,
one manuperforming the operation
while the other times him. After
making 20 or more parts, the men will
change places, and thus, by alternate-
ly timing each other, they will en-
deavor to gain the greatest possible
efficiency before the operation has been
performed on 100 of the parts.
The spreader to be made is the in-
vention of Mr. John H. Stevenson,
foreman and instructor in the engi-
neering shops, and for some time past
has had rather a wide distribution.
It is hoped by the originator of the
plan to be able to have the system in
full operation within a year, 'it being
delayed that long due to the equip-
ment it may be necessary to add for
full operation.
MAYOR MAC SWINEY REPORTED
IMPROVED AND RESTING WELL
London, Oct. 9.-The Irish Self-De-
termination league issued a bulletin
tonight saying that the condition of
Lord Mayor MacSwiney was improved
and that he was resting well. An
earlier bulletin described his condi-
tion as very weak.
STUDENTS' WIVES INVITED
TO MICHIGAN DAMES MEETING
Wives of students who are now liv-
ing in Ann Arbor for the first time
are especially urged to call Mrs.
Charles Wilkie, and leave their ad-
dresses in order that they may be
called for and taken to the first meet-
ing of the Michigan Dames. This meet-
ing will be held at 8 o'clock Tuesday
evening, Oct. 19, at Lane hall.

Architects' Drawings in Hands of
Official; Await Arrangement
of Finances
Plans,'drawn by Pond and Pond of
Chicago, architects of the Union, for
a larger tap room, to cost approxi-
mately $100,000, are in the hands of
Homer Heath, general manager of the
Union. Funds are not yet available
for its construction, but officials look
forward to the building of the new ad-
dition as soon as finances are in shape
to make this possible.
Expansion of the Union, officials
say, demands a larger tap room. The
present room is so popular that it is
hardly adequate to meet the present
needs of men students. Its success
far exceeded the expectations of the
most optimistic of the Union officials.
The new plans call for a room aboue
four times as large as the present
quarters, with seating facilities for
600 men. The bar is to be 100 feet
in length. The present bar is 30 feet
lohg. Furnishings .in the new tap
room are to Pe of the same character
as are now used.
Serve Many
According to Union officials, there
are seats for 148 men in the present
tap room, yet 2,200. to 2,500 meals are
served by the cafeteria each day. In
addition there are 1,500 customers at
the bar daily.
The new tap room will accommo-
date about four times as many men,
thus eliminating the tendency towards
fast eating because of the rush In the
present quarters.
The court just southwest of the Un-
ion building will furnish the space
for the new tap room. Excavations will
be made to the basement level. The
bowling alleys will be moved to the
extreme south end of the addition.
and the new tap room will use the
space now occupied by the bowing,
alleys plus a great portion of the pro-
posed enlargement of the building.
The kitchens, which are very crowd-
ed. in their present location, will be
situated west of the new tap room.
Sky lights will furnish ample light-
Plan Serving Hall
There will be no evidences of serv-
ing of any kind in the tap room itself.
A long hall, to the rear of the room,
will be used as a serving hall. After
obtaining food there, the men will en-
ter the tap room and sit at the nu-
merous tables. A dumb waiter, in the
center of the room, will carry away
the dishes by an underground route.
The old tap room will continue to
be used after the addition is con-
structed, but it will serve another
purpose than it now does. Organiza-
tions wishing to use it for an evening
will be given permission to do so
when a function is given which de-
mands privacy and the tap room at-
mosphere.
More Additions
After the new tap rom is construct-
ed, another addition may be built over
the kitchens to the rear of the room.
The proposed additions are the
means which Union officials hope to
enlarge the building to meet the ever
increasing needs of the students, as
the present building is already out-
growing itself, they say.
Auto Hits Child; Slightly Injured
Darting out in front of a taxi yester-
day near the Arcade theater a small
girl, Francis Cushing, was knocked
to the pavement and stunned. She was
rushed to the hospital where it wa
found that she suffered no serious in-
juries. The taxi was driven by Fred
'Bierman of the Ann Arbor Taxicab
company.

At the opening reception of the
Women's league, to take place at 4
o'clock Tuesday afternoon, October 19,
President Marion L., Burton will ad-
dress the 1women students of the Uni-,
versity and all other members of the
league. Mrs. Burton will' also be a
guest of honor at this reception which
will mark the formal beginning for
the year of the usual series of Wo-
men's league parties.
President Burton will speak shortly
after 4 o'clock in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, and will outline briefly, for
the benefit of entering students, the
function and policies of the league,
and the part it plays in the life of the
women students. As all women stu-
dents bedome members of the league
automatically when they pay their ma-
triculation fee, and as there are many
alumnae members a large attendance
may be expected.
FOOTBALL RESULTS
Wisconsin, y27; Michigan Aggies, 0.
Ohio State, 37; Oberlin, 0.
Notre Dame, 42, Western State Nor-
mal, 0.
Chicago, 20; Purdue, 0.
Johns Hopkins, 0; Syracuse, 0.
Carl Johnson in Ann Arbor
Carl M. Johnson, '20, member of
America's Olympic squad, all star
track man, and captain last year, is
back in Ann Arbor. He is at the Un-
ion at present but his plans for the
future are not known. -

ing the war, will present an exception-
al program.
The United States Marine band will
appear on Nov. 13. This organiza-
tion has had a continuous existence
for a century and a quarter and has
participated in every presidential in-
augural since 1801. The present brief
tour is the first which the band has
been permitted to take in nearly a
decade.

THE WEATHER
Change in Temperature

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan