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December 12, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-12

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:Mt'*r 4ju

muig

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF- T14E UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
blication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ted in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
Subscription by carrier or mrail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
re not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
.and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
'etion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dail' office.
gned communications will receive no consideration. No mnan-
pt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
he evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MAGING EDITOR.............GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR
,s Editor.........................Chesser M. Campbell
.t Editors-. . . .V. H itch o k
T. H.. AdamsH.WHicok
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood JA enti
ay Editor................ stn
rials...... ........ Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T, j.Whinery
.tat News-........... ....................P. Lovejoy Jr.
................................. Robert Angell
nen's Editor........................Mary D Lane
graph ........ ...... ................West Gallogly
cpe .................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
pbine Waldo Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
O_ Weber Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klaver
na Barlow Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
bkreth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
. Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beata Haslet'
,ge Reindel Hughston McBain Kathrine Montgomery
thy Monfort Frank H. McPike Gerald P. Overton
y B. Grundy J. A. Bacon Edward Lambrecht
ces Oberholtzer W. W. Ottaway William H. Riley Jr
rt E. Adams Paul Watzel Sara Waller
nan CA Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
;INESS MANAGER ........,LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
ertising ..................................-.D- P. Joyce
ifids............................Robt. 0. Kerr
ication'.'.'...'......................... -- . M. Reath
unts.................. ..............R
lation\ ......................................V.yF. Hillery
Assistants
N. Larnbrecht P. R Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
,. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
und Kunstadter Robt. LDavis Thos. L. Rice
er W. Millard M. M. Moulew . G. Slawsn
$Iarel Jr.- D. S. Wattjerworth R. G. Burchell

Y

The gymnasium only holds a limited number of
spectators, and every year some are disappointed in
being unable to witness some of the bigger games.
An opportunity will soon be given each student to
secure seats for two of the contests and it will pay
to be on hand when that chance comes. But no
matter how many games we attend, there is one
thing that we can certainly do and that is to boost
and boost hard. Basketball is in the ascendancy
now and we ought to give it just the same kind of
All-Michigan support that we give football and
baseball in their season.
THE OSBORN ADDRESS
Chase S. Osborn, ex-governor of Michigan,
speaks at the Union service at Hill auditorium to-
night. The Union meetings are non-sectarian and
offer a chance for the students and townspeople to
attend lectures which treat of practical Christian-
ity, brought out by well-known chgurchmen and
laymen. Mr. Osborn, in addition to being a for-
mer governor, was at one time a regent of the Uni-
versity and has at various times published newspa-
pers throughout this state and Wisconsin. His
subject this evening, "Life and Knowledge," will
undoubtedly treat of Christian living rather than
of Christian theology.-
Most of us can ill afford to pass up the chance
to hear a man of Mr. Osborn's character. His
ideas will undoubtedly help us in attaining the goal
which we as students are all attempting to reach.
GET INTO THE GAME
The Intramural department is entering upon a
heavy program for the year, to include swimming,
hockey, bowling, basketball, indoor and outdoor
track, and baseball contests, both between the va-
rious fraternities and between classes.
The program outlined is quite inclusive, and pro-
vides a highly cmmendable means of keeping up
class and organizaztion rivalry. It is, moreover, an
encouragement for the men to get out and partici-
pate, men who, perhaps, would not take part in any
sport otherwise. Heretofore,.however, there have
been a certain few men and organizations who have
come out regularly and helped to build up the
spirit of friendly opposition while the rest were too
often rather minus quantities. With such a pro-
gram ahead, and with opportunity given for each
organization and each class to take part in a num-
ber of sports, there is hardly any excuse for a lack
of interest on the part of any group. The club or
.class that does lie down on the job and let the
rest go ahead ana compete for the honors is the
loser in the long run.
Let's get-into the game and make the intramural
sports amount to more than they ever have before.
"Jimmy Demands a Woolly Sheep" - Daily
headline, referring to Christmas gifts to Ann Arbor
poor children. Probably most of the Ann -Arbor
Jimmies would prefer the woolly sheep in the form
of a good warm outfit of clothes. How about it,
Michigan?
We hasten to remind the three co-eds who so
frequently block the only entrance of Tappan hall
between classes ;hat they're becoming a serious fire
menace.
' The best way to avoid using the aisle or a seat-
arm for a Pullman: Make that reservation now
and let the railroad know you're coming.
Are you fortified with a barrage of Michigan
"dope" to talk up from end to end of the Christ-
mas holidays?
The Telescope
STANDING
No. of Contribs Points
Men..........280 280
Women......... 83 249

Sunday again finds the women hanging over
the ropes with nothing but the week-end gong to
save them from defeat . Only a truly remarkable
and immediate exhibition of recuperative powers
can avert their being lost forever in the maelstrom
of male wit.
So many requests have come in that we print
our own picture in these columns that we have at
last decided to accede to the request and reproduce
below our latest photographic likeness,

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK
-s o ~

UNIVERSITY MEN! Invest your
spare monies with the HURON VAL-
LEY BLDG. & SAVINGS ASSO. Div-
idends wil double it in ten years. Can
iraw it ANYTIME & get 5 per et.
from date of investment. f. H.
HER BSTSec'y., A. A. Savings Bank
Isdg.-Adv.
DItOIT UNITED LINES
In ElTect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
limited and Express' cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 -a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. in. and e',ery two
hours to 9:48 p. i.
Locals to Detroit- 5 55a.m., 7:00 a.m
and every two hours to 9:00 p. in..
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only.
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m
Locals to Jackson-7:6 0a. m.. and
12:10 p.m!
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
Nen: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished anq re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
longaand saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
TUT TLE'S
,LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"
O LLA

E1CCD N

Ask for the

U

CARDS
AND FANCY
CHRISTMAS
STATIONERY
207 OFF

I

|| 0 . D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade
Gilbert's and Martha Washington
candies for Xmas, Packed for mail-
ng. Tice's Drug Store, 117 S. Main
St.-Adv.
Read The Daily for Campus News.

T6. Smart Looking, Popular Shoe
for CAMPUS
#nd CLASS ROOM
Ideal, All Round College Shoe
Same High Quality as the
TOM LOGAN GOLF SHOE
If your dealer cannot :Puplo
THOMAS H.LOGAN COMPANY
Hudson. Mass.
Send for the Tor Logan Calendar,
which pictures, suitable for framing,
the International Golf match between
Ouimet. Ray and VNardori.

OF

GRAHAM

+nw ..o. r., ..te r '.y.. i rrY w +

TWO STORES

Open eivenings Until Christmas

-
Persos wishing to seure information concerning news for an
~sue of Tlhe Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
f all news to be printed that night.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1920.
. Night Editor-RENAUD SHERWOOD
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITYf
Michigan's catalogue lists more than one hun-
red seventy-eight entire courses, counting a com-
lete study, as bacteriology, English literature, or
rench, as a unit. Of this number, sixty-four are
alght in the Literary college.
THE MERITS OF "SOPHISTICATON"
Detroit schoolmen are much exercised over the
icreasing "sophistication," as they put it, of high
:hool students. They bewail the fact that the
oys and girls are acting and dressing like their
lders. There is doubtless room for criticism of
ress and dancing by those who are constitution-
Ily opposed to admitting anything good about what
new. But there is some chance in spite of this
onservative opposition to see beneficial results in
he "sophistication" of high school students.
It would doubtless be fair to judge the results
f the modern tendenciesby comparing the first
ear men on the campus now with those of say
ve years ago. Few people would be prepared to
ay that the morality of the freshmen this year is
ot just as good as it was then. Marked changes
f another sort are apparent nevertheless. The
reshmen of the last few years are better dressed,
iore self-reliant, have a broader talking knowledge
n diversified subject matter and are on the whole
ore interesting than were their predecessors.
'hey seem to fit in with greater facility. Most of
hem are capable of acting as cultured people in
>cial gatherings instead of behaving like lost lambs
'nong a pack of wolves every time they are placed
i the midst of strangers.
.There is a bare chance that the same forces which
re tending toward the production of "sophisti-
ated" students in the schools of Detroit are also
elping to change the genus freshman from a
goof 'into a self-possessed young man or woman
f social possibiblities. If this be so, these forces
re not without mitigating influences.
The modern high school graduate'is hardly "so-
histicated" in the true meaning of the term; he is
ot artificially subtle, but simply better able to take
are of himself. As long as this quality remains
mply what we sum up in the word "poise", it is
esirable in a freshman; it is only when he be-
>mes proud of it and tags himself as "cocky", that
is campus elders justly take him in hand.
BASKETBALL'S TURN
'Fhis year the Maize and Blue has some big bas-
etball games scheduled. There are thirteen con-
sts remaining on the list and twelve of these are
ith Conference schools. The thirteenth game
>mes January 3, a day or so before we return
-om the holiday vacation, but being with an
astern school, it marks something of a change in
[ichigan's recent athletic policy.
Throughout the hard season ahead we must re-
ember that a basketball squad is just like the
even which lines up every year on the gridiron -
ere is a psychology in the sound of the voices of
-iendly rooters, and we-owe the men who work out
Lily on the floor of Waterman gymnasium just as
uch in the way of suvort as we owe the Michi-
,n warriors of football fame.

HOLIDAY GIEU'TS
for Men

We are showing an excellent
Knitted Neckwear and Scarfs."
be had in both Wool and Silk
consistent with the times.

assortment of
The latter to
and at prices

Clothes, Furnishings and Hats

4'

TINKER

& COMPANY

S. State St. at William St.

Eli

I

KLKIN
co~

PARTY

DRESSES

CLEANED
ANDf
REFINISHED
PERFECTLY
pMEjAh4RS -"" I
i{".5 ". :"" "-
"'ii' "~i ,ft: : ":{ss::. s"''5.. i

324 SOT H $TATE STRET
EAST AND $OUTH UNIVERSITY AVFNIJES

711 PACARD STREET

0

Call and see these

r "

TWENTY-ONE

This picture of us was taken right after we had
finished our usual evening's work. We might add
that at the time the picture was taken we had just
got through calling an ace high flush, which ac-
counts for the rather blank expression on our face.
Oh! Thats' Different
Frosh-I'd like to get this shirt repaired.
Salesman-Why, we don't repair shirts here.
Frosh-That's funny. Your sign says, "SHIRTS
RETAILED."
Pamousg Closing Lines
"Rushing the growler," he muttered as he saw
them chasing the bulldog.
NOAH COUNT.

YEARS' SATISFACTORY

ERTNCI

.
. ..
:1
r ,1
E .
P r.,.
...... ,1'
_ _
_ -
,
...
.-
- -

Just reccived.
They're up to the
standard of qual-
ity we have set for
thlis §tore-tke
kigk,

WE 0

PLEATING

OF ALL

i11A

KINDS

.

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