100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SECTION

r Sit

:3ai1tj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AMD NIGHTTIWIRE
SERVICE

ONE

,,..

PRICE FIVE CR

VOL. XXXI. No. 59.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1920.

PRICE FIVE CE

V

DISARMAMENT IS
GRADUALPROCESS
COlUIIISSION MEMBERS BELEIVE
PUBLIC OPINION NOT
READY

JAPAN
WHILE

CANNOT REDUCE
U. S. ENLARGES

Good Seats Left
For Atinstrelsy;
Sale Nets ooo
When the reserved seat "Minstrel-
sy" ticket sale for Union nmembers
closed at noon yesterday, about 1,000
of the available seats had been sold.
There are a number of choice seats
remaining, however, and these have
been transferred to the Whitney thea-
ter, where the general public will be
given an opportunity to secure them
at the box office commencing at 10
o'clock Monday morning.
Considering the financial outlay of
more than $2,000 it is essential that
this final sale meet with good re-
sponse in order to insure the finan-
cial success of the production.
It is reported that the musical clubs
are at their best in this offeriig and
rehearsals indicate that it will be one
of the most unusual and diverting
forms of campus entertainment.
BAKERY PRODUCTS
PRICE TOO HIGH

Question of Choosing Four Elective'
Members Starts Long and
Confused Debate
(By Associated Press)
Geneva, Dec. 11.-Disarmament of
the world must be a slow and gradualT
process, is the decision reached by. the
league of nations assembly commis-f
sion which has been deliberating on
the question more than three weeks.
The opinions of the leading mem-
bers of the commission are that neith-
er the political situation nor public
opinion is yet ready for full realiza-
tion of that fact. I
Reduction in Stages
In fact, the beginning of the re-
duction of armaments is not consid-I
ered pssible at the present time. Ac-
cording to the program of the as-
sembly it is to proceed in three
stages. The first involves an agree-
ment between the powers to make no
further increases in armaments. The
second will provide for a general re-
duction on a basis which will be
laid down by the armament commis-
sion of the council of the league. The
third will provide for general and
complete disarmament, when it may
be found that the situation permits it.
Viscount Ishi improved the occa-
sion to give notice that Japan cannot
reduce her armament so long as Un-
ited States increases hers. One con-
spicuous- fact is the necessity of pro-
paganda to prepare the world for a
radical solution of the question.
Election Debated
The covenant of the league agai
gave rise to a long and confused de-
bate in the assembly this afternoon.
The question was how to chose the
four elective members of the council.
It had previously been decided that
the terms of these members should be
limited to two years with a period of
ineligibility after the first term.
Another provision stoutly contested
was the apportioning of members
among the different continents, which
gave Europe and the Americas three
and Asia one. This provision was
held to be contrary to the covenant
which provides that the assembly
shall "freely" choose the members of
the council, while apportionment
would tie the hands of the next as-
sembly.-
SSNDSRY SRCES IN
ANN RBOR CHURCHS
Ten men of the Guild Evangelical
band and Mr. Lionel Crocker, their
leader, will participate in the services
at the First Baptist church today
Four bandmen will speak on "Jesus
the Savior of Men" at the service at
10:30 o'clock and six others on "The
Right Decision" at the evening serv-
ice
ieModern Thought Is Topic
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas of the Con-
gregational church will address his
morning congregation on "The Capi-
-talization of Losses: the Process of
Converting Liabilities into Assets."
The subject of discussion of the forum
at noon today is "Modern Thinking
Concerning Christ." It is stated that
these discussions may clarify some
of the misconceptions which several
(Continued on Page Six)

FORMER GOVERNOR
TALK S TON IHT
Life and Knowledge Topic of Address
at University Servs
lees
IS STRONG, ORIGINAL
SPEAKER, SAYS BEAL
Chase S. Osborn, ex-governor of
Michigan and former regent of the
University, speaks at 7 o'clock to-
night at the University service in Hill
auditorium. His subject is "Life and
Knowledge."
"Noted throughout the country as
an orator and recently as an author-
ity on iron ore, Mr. Osborn is an ex-
pert in many fields," said Regent Ju-
nius E. Beal, with whom the former
governor is staying. -"His reputa-
tion as an editor world traveler,
chemist, and asthe discoverer of the
Moose Mountain iron range, has giv-
en him a broad experience on which
to base a speech on "Life and Knowl-
edge," and I am positive that it will
be vitally interesting to University'
students.
In addition to the address tonight,
there will be two hymns by the con-
gregation, a quartette, the scripture
lesson and the prayer. Harry G.
Mershon, associate minster of the
Congregational church, will give the
prayer and read the scripture. Music
is in charge of William Wheeler, of
the School of Music, who will direct
the quartette. Earl V. Moore, of the
School of Music, is to be at the or-
gan and the meeting will be presided
over by Chesser M. Campbell, '21.
PARTY AND GIFTS WILL'
BE 6 EN- POOR TOTS

500 ATTEND PANTY
FOR '24 WOMEN IN ATHLETIC BOARD PLANS TO ERECT
BARBOUR GYM si
More than 500 freshmen were en-NEN STANDS TO COMPLETE t0hhOF
tertained at the 40th annual freshman n in~
spread whichw held lastnigh

ing the grand march in which all
classes took part a gigantic block "M"
was formed.
Never before have the decorations
been so elaborate. A false ceiling
was formed by a lattice-work of many
colored crepe paper and all of the
rooms were trimmed with ChristmasI
bells and holly. Programs with red-
green, and blue pencils carried out
the color scheme.
One of the special features of the
evening was a favor dance which was
the third on the program. The fresh-
men and sophomores only took part in
this dance, the juniors and seniors
looking on from the balcony.f
The patronesses of the party wereI
wives of the members of the faculty.
T HOMA9sO0N S PEAKS
TODAY AT UNION
Successful Newspaper Man Will Talk
at First of Union Sunday
Meetings
''THE NEWSPAPER GAME" TOPIC
OF BIG DAILY MANAGER

BOARD CONSIDERS RESIGNITION
OF P. G. BARTELME; NO
ACTION TAKEN
MICHIGAN WILL GO TO
EASTERN TRACK MEET
Bids Will Be Received for New Stands
Which May Be Started
Next Spring

Cost to Students Unreasonable;
to Poor Buying Judgment
Says Local Dealer

Due

Erection of a new north concrete
stand and a new west stand to com-
plete the "U" stadium at Ferry field
was the chief matter brought up at
the meeting of the Board in Control
of Athletics last night, and definite
action was taken towards this end. At
the same meeting P. G. Bartelme, ath-
letic director, tendered his resigna-
tion, the board taking the same un-
der advisement.
Bids to Be Called For
Plans will be given to the engi-
neers for final completion and bids
will be called for. According ta, the
estimate of the board, between $350,-
000 and $400,000 will be needed for
the work, and it is considered very
likely that should the bids be about
that amount, contracts will be let.
Work will commence in the spring
and the "U" will be completed by
fall, if unforeseen obstacles do not
arise. The final test, however, will
come about the middle of January
when the board will .meet to .accept

FLOUR, SUGAR, AND LARD
DECLINE CAUSE COST DROP
Wholesale and retail prices of
bread, rolls, cookies and almost all
baked goods have had a decline of
from 10 to 20 per cent, it was learned
yesterday from an inquiry of Ann Ar-
bor bakeries. Because of the marked
decline in the price of flour which at
one time was $17 per barrel and is
now $9.65, of sugar which was 30
eents a pound and is now 10, and
lard, lard compounds, and shortening
which was from 30 to 33 cents and
is now down to 12 and 13 cents in
some grades, the bakers have cut their
prices to about the level of the 1918
market.

Cost Not Considered
"I can't see why people who sell our
products do not sell them for less. We
are certainly wholesaling them for1
less. I have on hand quite a stock
of expensive raw materials, but I am
selling my goods on the basis of the,
present cost of materials. I don't
think students should be made to pay
for expensive stocks which business
men now hold, and which really rep-
resent a mistake in buying," was the
observation of one baker yesterday.
Large loaves of bread wholesale for
13 cents now compared with 15 cents
two weeks ago, while the retail price
is 15 cents instead of the former price
of 17 cents. Showing a decrease of
3 cents a dozen, rolls sell now for
17 cents wholesale at one bakery,
while at another the price is 15 cents
wholesale supplanting a former price
of 17 cents. At the latter bakery the
retail price of rolls is 18 cents com-
pared with 20 cents before.
Cookies are down from 22 cents to
17 cents per dozen wholesale, while
cakes have dropped a nickel. Former-
ly wholesaling at 25 cents, they sell
now for 20 cents. Retail prices on
cakes are now 25 cents compared with
30 cents previously.
Meat Steady
Meats held their own the past
week, showing little change in price.
The spectacular drop in pork from
50 cents to 35 cents a pound, and the
drop of about 4 cents a pound in the
cheaper grades of beef still stand out
as the only declines in the principal
items in the meat market.
Three meals a day for $6 a week
is the rate at the Martha Cook dor-
mitory, where 118 women are serv-
ed. Overhead expenses for hired help
and gas are included in this price, but
not heat and light, which are furn-
ished by the University. Another sav-
ing effected there which is not made
(Continued on page Six)

Provisions have 'been made by a
committee of students to insure at
Christmas celebration for the poor
children in Ann Arbor hospitals and
for the children of local poor fami-'
lies. In addition to gifts of clothing
a Christmas party will be given for'
the children at 4:30 o'clock next
Thursday afternon in Lane hall.
This action is the result of the re-
quests of numerous studgents who,
because they are not connected with
fraternities, do not take part in the
annual Christmas charitable work of
these organizations. These students
feel that they want to do something
for the poor during the holiday sea-
son and the celebration in Lane hall
wil give them the opportunity.
Merchants Will Be Asked
Funds for the work will be raised
by means of don'ation boxes and by
solicitation of State street merchants.
In so far as some of the recipients of
the Christmas gifts will be Ann Arbor
children it is felt that the merchants
will be glad to assist in the work.
Boxes will be placed in prominent
positions on the campus Tuesday and
Wednesday. There will be no direct
solicitation.
Clothing Needed
According to Mrs. H. S. Mallory,
social service director of the Homoe-
opathic hospital, there is a great need
of shirts and other old clothing for
distribution among the poor. She-re-
quests that students having anything
of this sort save them until next
Monday or Tuesday, at which time a
truck will make a tour for collec-
tion. This truck will also be used
'o gather in the trinkets left from the
Christmas tree parties in the various

S. E. Thomason, '04, business mana-
ger of the Chicago Tribune, will
speak on "The Newspaper Game" at
3:30 o'clock today in the assembly
hall of the Union at the first of the-
series of Sunday afternoon meetings.
The meeting is to be not over an hour
in length, there being only a single
musical number in addition to the
talk.
Informal Talk
Making no pretense at oratory, Mr.
Thomason will endeavor to keep away
from the formal lines of an address,
and will informally discuss the ad-
vantages and opportunities as well as
the disadvantages of the newspaper
business. His attempt will be to make
clear to students just what to expect
in this work after they leave the Uni-
versity. The remarks, while giving
practical suggestions to those who in-
tend to enter the work, will be broad
enough to be of interest to those who
wish only to inform themselves as
to how a large newspaper plant is
opbrated.
A very successful newspaper man,
Mr. Thomason is manager of one of
the biggest dailies of the country.
Several years ago his salary was
$50,000 a year, and since tfien he has
had several increases. In addition to
his immediate duties in Chicago, he
1ooks after the paper's pulp mills in
Canada, which are the source of the
Tribune's print paper supply.
Before his appointment to the busi-
ness managership, he was chief of the
Tribune's legal staff, where his suc-
cess was marked. In one case he se-
cured a judgment of $600,000 and in
another a judgment for $400,000. No
doubt he will figure prominently in
the $10,000,000 suit which the city of
Chicago is waging against the Trib-,
une.

The following fraternities and house
clubs have not as yet rendered -a re-
port: Acacia, Alpha Chi Sigma, Al-
pha Kappa Kappa, Alpha Phi Alpha,
Alpha Sigma, Alpha Tau Omega, Del-
ta Sigma Delta, Delta Sigma Phi, Del-
ta Tau Delta, Delta Theta Phi, Gamma
Alpha, Gamma Eta Gamma, Kappa
Nu, Lambda Chi Alpha, Nu Sigma
Nu, Phi Alpha Delta, Phi Beta Pi, Phi
Chi, Phi Delta Chi, Phi Delta Theta,
Phi Rho Sigma, Phi Sigma Delta,
Phi Sigma Kappa, Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon, Sigma Delta Kappa, Sigma Nu,
Theta Chi, Theta Xi, and the Monon
club.
Officials of the dirve request a re-
port from each team and fraternity
immediately. Reports will be receiv-
d in the Union lobby cage each aft-
ernon until the campaign is over-sub
scribed.
POLITICIANS EE SELVES
HRAT RECENT CAPAIN

CHASE S. OSBORN WHO WILL
TALK TONIGHT IN HILL AUDI-
TORIUM.
FAI1LURE OF SOCIETIES
TO REPORT DELAS DRIVE
Final reports last night on the
Union swimming pool drive showed
only a total of 1,556 pledges signed
or $28,609. This showing necessi-
tates a continuation of the cam-
paign into next week. The outstand-
ing feature of the drive to date has
been the failure of the fraternities and
house clubs to report anything near
the desired totals.

or reject bids.
One of the members of the board
expressed the opinion: "I think the
estimate reasonably safe."
Third Scheme Selected
Three schemes for construction
work of stands on Ferry field were
submitted to the board in plans
drawn by the staff of the Engineering
college. Scheme three calling for the
completion of the "U" by two snew
.tands was the one accepted, the
board feeling that as long as some
building was done it should do a
thorough job. One of the other
schemes was for the construction of
a new north stand only, while the
second was for a new west stand
only.

houses.
J. B. Brill, '21E, is chairman of the
committee handling the work, and the
members of the committee are: Mark
Covel, '21, Harold Lindsay, '21, Fred
Petty, '21, Roswell Dillon, '21E, W. B
Gilbert, '22, R. E. Adams, '23, John
Stewart, '21, M. J. Kusterer, '21, J. H.
Moore, '22L, Lois DeVries, '21, and
Aletha Yerkes, '21.

Was Daily Editor
Mr. Thomason graduated with the
class of '04, and has always been loy-
al to the University. He is a strong
supporter of the Union. Chief among
his activities during his college days
was the managing editorship of The
Daily, which he held first after the
reorganization of the paper.
In an effort to help students decide
while they are still in the University
just what line of work they wish to
take up after leaving, the Union has
instituted a series of Sunday after-
noon meetings at which the leaders
in America of various businesses and
professions will speak.

Washington, Dec. 11. - The an-
nual dinner of the Gridiron club to-
night was made occasion for a post
mortem on the presidential election,
the purpose being to give politicians
present an opportunity to see them-
selves as others saw them during the
campaign. One of the happy episodes
of the skit was a front porch meet-
ing at Marion with such characters
as Senator Harding, Harry Daugher-
ty, Al Jolson, W. J. Bryan, and
'Slush Fund Rumor" participating.
Daugherty stalked the front porch
in the role of "Koko the Lord High
Executioner" and pounced upon
"Slush Fund Rumor" when he invad-
ed the Harding lawn. Will Hays sang
plaintively to the Republican candi-
(Continued on Page Six)

Will Scat 44,004
Seating approximately 44,400 the
the proposed new stand will be about
equal in size to the Harvard stadium
and smaller than the Yale bowl by
about 18,000. Plans were drawn un
der the direction of Professor Gram
of the Engineering college and it
them future expansion is anticipated
for some day additions can be bull
above the present proposed heights
The stands .would then be what ar(
termed "double-deckers."
No reason was given for the re
signation tendered by P. G. Bartelme
who has been athletic director sinc
1909. The resignation was taken unJ
der advisement by the board.
It was voted to send the track teat
to the eastern intercollegiates nU0
spring, the first time this has bee
done in three years. Approving th
track, baseball and football schedule
as they now stand, the -board sane
tioned the athletic program of th
teams as they had been announced be
fore. Awards of Ms, AMAs and 11
as heretofore announced were ap
proved.
Laws Will Hold Smoker Wedneedt
Tickets for the annual All-La;
smoker, which will be held at 7:3
o'clock Wednesday evening in the a:
sembly room of the Union, will b
placed on sale in the corridors of ti
Law building tomorrow.
A program consisting of talks I
Dean Bates and the class presiden
and music is being arranged.

THE WEATHER
Unsettled; Probably Rain pr

Snow

BY Professor

FREE

LECTURE

Herm ann

S.

AT
Whitney THEATRE
TODAY

On

Hering C. S. B.

of
CONCORD,

Christian

Science

N. H.

3P. M.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan