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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 11, 1920 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-11

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1 I l. WI_ ivttt JJUlaE- j' V IL ,I

~Ijt:3IC1qZIUDad
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER of THE UIVECRSITY
* OF MICHIGAN
Published .every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sty year by the Board in Control cif Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
:rThe.- Associated Press' is exclusively entitled to the use for
1"pb3*caj~ of all news dispatches credited to it or nt otherwise
r'ditb this paper and the local news published therein.
"Entered'at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan as second
alss matter.
Subscription by carrier or mal, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press bulding, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business 96; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 'words, if signed, the sig-
natureAot necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
Uait. ",and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
disretiosn of the Editor, if left at or maild to The Daily ofice
Unignied communications will receive no consideration. No man-
isot will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
.~he Daly does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed ii the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIIM STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR........ "...GEORGE . BROPHY JR
N'fws Aditor..........................Chesser M. Campbell
ight Editors-
- .H. Adams H. W. Hitccc
B. P. Campbell J. E. M Manas
j. I. Dakn T. W. Sargent, Jr.
-Renaud Sherwood na dtr. ....A
B e n t i . . . . I e o d u f o e t S g , T o e o s s is ta n t N e w s . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E . P . L o v e jo y J r .
Sports............................ Robert Angell
Women's Editor ... .....................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph .. .... ......................West Gallogly
Telescope .............. ..................... .Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Byron Darnton H.L E. Howlett
Pahl, G. Weber Thomas R, Dewey M. A. Klaver
Aloena 'Barlow Wallace F. FEliott 1:. R. Meiss
elizabeth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beata Hasley
Gerge Reindelf Hughston Mclain Katrine Montgomery
IDorothy- Monfort F rank H. MPike Gerald P. Overton
Harry B. Grundy J. A. Bacon Edward Lanbrecht
Fraices Oberholtzer W. W. Ottaway William H. Riley Jr.
Robet . Adams Paul Watzel Sara Waler
Not Man C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.
BUSINESS STAFF
nu Telephione 960
BU+SINESS' MANAGER ......... LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising .... ..... .... ................ D. P. Joyce
Cllsaifieds........ .....................Robt. . Kerr
Publication ........ .............. ..... M. Reth~
Accounts...... ................. ..R 1rehs
Ciehtion............................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. °W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
$. G. Gower. F. A. Cross R. C: Starnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
3cster 'W. Millard M. M. Morale D. G. Slawnti
J. T. Iramel Jr. D.'5 Watterworth R. G. Burchell
-Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, whoha full charge
of al newto be printed that night.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1920.
Night Editor-JOHN I. DAKIN.
KNOW, YOUR UNIVERSITY
,Michigan ranks third among the great universi-
ies of the country as to the number of students
enroled on the, campus, being excelled only by Co-
ut~ibia and California universities, respectively.
*PROFITING FROM THE DECLINE
Taken in the light of recent disclosures in the
Ailn Arbor boarding house situation, the announce-'
nent of a local grocer that boarding houses could
mmtxediately -reduce prices from fifty cents to a
lollar a week because of cheaper groceries, meats,
ad othier foodstuffs, indicates conclusively that
hose boarding house proprietors who have made no
eductions in their rates are taking an unnecessar-
ly sefish view of the food situation, in seizing the
whole profit, on every iecline for themselves, and
.oally ignoring the interests of the students who
.re their patrons.
That this policy cannot succeed in the long run
,yen though, it will result in temporary profits has
thready been reaized by some cafeterias and board-
rig houlses which 'have shown a disposition to give
he student his share by cutting prices in accordance
with. reduced costs.
Whxen school began this fall considerable redc-
ions in food prices had already taken place as cor-
ired-with the, costs when the 'board tariffs were
xed. 'Since then further declines of increased sig-
Lificance have been registered.!resulting in the glar-
rig discrepancy that now exists between the cost of
'ood. and what it is sold for. During the whole

eriod from October first until now every time the
'armer has been paid, less for food, additional sur-
Aus profit in the pockets of the boarding house
rotorietors has resulted.
Boarding house- proprietors who have made no
seductions have been keeping the profits from de-
lines in food prices entirely to themselves for more"
han a month arld a half. The situation has reached
.point now where price reductions must be made
o give the student a square deal.
THE SOUL OF THE CITY .
,James Schermerhorn, editor of the Detroit
imes, made ' the statement before the University
tress club that a city had no "soul" and add-d,
They have sunk toio deep in materialism." He
tressed the lack, in our\ cities, of neighborliness
rd culture.-
Perhaps it is not the place of a merely practice.
)urflalist to attemnt to' tread upon the theories of
man like Mr."Schermerhorn, but in reviewing the
oints made- in his address it would almost seem
iat the matter miz-ht be looked at from two sides.
sit not possible that there may be more than one
nd of a community soul and that the real soul of
,hich hie speaks does not. necessarily mean only a
evelonment of the, cultural side of life and the
1ttral side alone?
"Cities do not sing," says Mr. Schermerhorn.
ranted ; but while the city of today does not have"
s community ballads and airs as did those of past
res, it is true that the civic group of the present
radically different from that of former times
id that, instead of the municipality existing as a

governmental group in itself, it today exists as a
mere partt of a larger whole which is the nation.
This is an age of4 national, not local or individual
ideals; .the songs and sentiments of- today are the
songs and sentiments of the entire commonwealth.
Moreover, Mr. Schermerhorn's idea of a city's
soul seems to link rather closely with the higher,
development of culture we fnd in Europe, and to
discount as apparently unworthy of consideration
along this line the commercial spirit of America.
But while the cosmos of the Old World has to do
largely with an element of culture, this is an age
in America of science, of invention, of production,
and of transportation. We have the commercial
viewpoint and it would seem that this might be
considered the soul of the American city as art and
literature and the like were the embodiment of the
spirit of old Rome and Athens.
We should not discourage a development of cu-
ture by any means; we have only too little of it at
the present time. But should not a civic soul which
combines the cultural with our present commercial
life and, at the, same time, reaches out toward a re-
dievelopment of the family and community group,
be the ultimate goal toward which we as journal-
ists and citizens should strive?
THE FRESHMAN SPREAD
Tonight all women of the University will as-
semble together to celebrate the fortieth birthday
of the freshman spread. The idea of the affair,
that of honoring the freshmen and making them
feel at home in University, life, is one worthy the
support of all upperclasswomen.
To those women seniors in particular, who feel
but a lagging interest in an affair which no lnger
is invested with the glamour of novelty, a rflec-
tion on past freshman days when the spread held
a place of honor among the events of the 3ear will
perhaps bring the realization that this occasion wvar-
rants true self forgetfulness. The purpose of the
evening is to make the freshmen look back on this
occasion as one of the happiest of the -first year at
the University.
The spirit of good fellowship flows naturally on
an occasion such' as this. It. is easy "to show the
freshman a good time" once one is under the in-
fluence of the music, the gay decorations and en-
tertainment furnished by the sophomore hostesses.
The main thing is to -- show by our presence
our belief in this tradition, honored by forty ears'
observance, and the good time will follow of itself.
THE SECRET COURSE
"I wonder what he'd do to a student if he found
out something about this course ?" is a humorously
rueful question that is heard among the crowds
exiting from certain quizzes at Michigan.
Occasionally the University still presents the
spectacle of a professor laboring under the delu-
sion that in order to "stimulate intellectual curios-
ity" he must make his course a sort of puzzle, the
secrets of which are open only to the type of stu-
dent with the nut-cracker braifn.
Would it be folly to suggest that the greatest of
all stimulatofs to curiosity is the presentation of
.facts, facts, facts ; and that only when a whole field
of study is laid clearly before him does a student
really acquire that appreciation of significance
which makes for spontaneous research?
It's not too late to buy your railroad ticket early.
itie Telescope

r. .r..., __.

GRAHAM

TWO STORES

Open evenings Until Ch ristmas

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

DETROIT UNITED LINE
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920 Z
Bet-ween
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson Ai -
(Eastern Standard Time) i
Linlled and Express cars leave for y H !
Detroit at 6:05 a. in., 7:05 a. in.
8:0a . n oryt 0p .Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. mn. and. = ,
every two hours to 8:48 p. gym. Ex- -
presses at 9:48 a. in. and w.' ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-5 :55a.n., 7:00 a.m
and every two hours to 9: 00 p. Mn., ' s
also 11:00 p. mn. To Yptillantl only, -
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.mn., and 1:16 a.m.
12:10 P.M. a n
Z -7 jI

DECEMBER
S M T W T F 8
15 6 7 18 2 10 1
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just, as
long and saves you Sire to ten
dollars. We do only high cl-ass
work. Factory liat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.,

"Make It. etter i
DISPLA.Y*ED thruout the &agle factory is
this sig-MKEITBETE-an ever.
present reminder to the workers that staxnd-
aris iier e made to bie surpassed.A great
fui a ti E. 3 'xceptiL Al laundersing. Such,
work hip iAVto sake every Eagle
,Shirt the ia2:4 mI value at the prie.
ALL SHIRTS 20 PERCENT OFF
Jo F. WVER.ftUCO.
NEXT TO WVXZRTRI THEATRE

E

MTCHIGANENSLAN NOTICES
All 'fraternities, sororities, and
organizations must have pie-
tures taken for the Mlchlganen=
sign before Christmas vaca-
tion. Th~s is final.

Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
ise The Michigan Daily.--Adv.

x,-- ,, :.
_ ? '

STANDING
No of Contribs
MVen .........245
Women ........ 8o

Po-ints
245
240

,Jack and Jill went up the hill
To get something to eat.
Jack sold his safety razor
And Wp Gillette.

Dear Noah :
Why is it that all of England's great men are
buried in Westminster Abbey?
Perry Goric.
After considerable thought, on the :question we.
have come to the'° conclusion that the real reason
. why they are buried there is because they are 'dead.
You're right, Clarice, when you say that what
we need now is plenty of cheap ice -- we've al-
ready got plenty of cheap skates.
We Love Her Still
She is just a little co-ed
And she minds her P's and Q's,
She is strong on all convention,
Wears a fur coat, overshoes.
Paints her visage, chitter-chatter,
Always parades a senseless grin.
BtsesaltaIdeieFor she gives me Holland gint
J'had'ja Mean?_
She (evi. sy-YeI know ,.Mildred has.
beautiful hair but if I had hair like that I'd look
pretty, too.
He _(gallantly)-Not at all, your hair just suits
your, fface.
Famous Closing Ldines
"Ha, a roasted chicken," he muttered "as hie saw
the ,boss bawling out the stenographer.
NOAH COUNT.

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THE ICHU AN, NI-9
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THURSDAY, DEC. 9--2-5 and 7-9; FRIDAY, DC 0
_ 9-2ad25 A U DA ,--E.1-91
PRICES
ENTIRE LOWER FLOOR, BOX SEATS AND
FIRST -FOUR ROWS IN THE _ BALCONY
$1.50
NO WAR TA
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