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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 10, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HIGAN DAILY

SI

S -nit
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
iblished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
.ar by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
e Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
imition of all news 'dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
A in this paper and the local news published therein.
ntered at the postofihce at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
'atter.
ibscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
lices: Ann Arbor Press bulding, Maynard Street.
ones: Business. 96o; Editorial. 2414.
)mmunications not to exceed 300 words, if. signed, the sig-
not necessarily to appear ii print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The D~aily at the
ion of the Editor, if left ator mailed to The Daily office.
ied communications will rec^;ve4 no consideration. No man-
,will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
e Dany does not, necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
I in the communications.
Vhat's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
evening preceding insertion.
EDIT0RIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
GING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
Editor..........................Chesser M. Campbell
T H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock ,
B. P. Aambel . E. McManis
. .am eln T. W. Sargnt, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood J enti
.Editor.. ......... ................. A. Bernstein
als............Lee Woodruff, Robert sage, T . Whinery
nt News ....................E. Povejoy Jr.
...................................Robert Angell
n's Editor......... .. ... ........Mary D. Lane
pe .................+...........": kWestGallogly
'po..........................ackW. Kelly
Assistants
ine Waldo Byron Darnton H. I. Howlett
. Weber Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klavei-
a Barlow Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
th Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beata I-asley
Reindel Hughston McBain Kathrine Montgomery
y Monfort Frank, H. McPike Gerald P. Overton
B. GrundyJ A.kBacon Edward Lazbrecht .
s Oberholtzer W. W. Ottaway William H. Riley Jr.
E. Adams Paul Watzel Sara Waller
n C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr..
BUSINESS STAFF
- -Telephone 960
NES MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
sing ............................- -...D. P. Joyce
eds.......... ................ ..... ...Robt. 0. Kerr
ation..........".........".. ...........F. M. Heath
ts ...' ..............E. R. Vriehs
to...........-------.- .-.....-..V. F. Hillery
Assistants
Lambre P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
*d Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawsnnr
[amel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

.,

in a word, to know the undergraduate.
Shortly after the war started he resigned his po-
sition went to London and was appointed director
of recruiting offices. In 19I8 he was made min-
ister of reconstruction. Because of his keen in-
sight into matters of state, his diplomatic ability,
and his knowledge of people, and not as the result
of a political pull, he is now serving as ambassador
to the United States.
The graduating student can learn a great deal
from a man who knows so much about the life
and problems of one attending a university, who
knows what the university student must cope with
when he leaves his Alma Mater, whose knowledge
of and friendship for the American people is prob-
ably not surpassed by that of any other foreigner.
HOW ABOUT DEBATING?
Every so often we hear someone ask, "What's
the news on Michigan debating? Why don't we
hear more about it ?"
The question is timely. We give much time
and enthusiasm to boosting athletics, especially
football, and we are .ever anxious to win some-,
thing. This is highly commendable, for it helps to
improve the college spirit; but while we are in for
competition, why can't we develop a little prp-
nounced anxiety to beat somebody along intellectual
lines as well as athletic?
Debating is one of the forms of strictly intellec-
tual competition which might be encouraged by the
entire student body, but is not. A handful of stu-
dents regularly attend the meetings of debating so-
cietiqs and take part in the meets, but most of us.
seem to have little -interest in this orm of activity ;
and, if we do attend, we seem to-do so with the ex-'
pectation of being bored for the period of an hour
or more. The result is that the big men, and often
the best debaters, on the campus have not lately
turned out as they should, have not taken part in
the work of the societies, and debating has fallen
off in importance.
Oratorical work and the preparation for con-
tests of this sort are helpful, however, and should
be encouraged. Such a pronounced lack of interest
in one of the activities which makes most toward
personality, culture, and the faculty of leadership
is, in University men and women, nothing short of
deplorable and, even with all the rest of our outside
interests, there seems to be no good Feason why we'
should not give debating the support it deserves.
It's odd but true that a student gets off more old
correspondence just before he goes home for
Christmas vacation than he does in a whole semes-
ter
What are you doing to make this Christmas a
genuine Yuletide for the poor children of Ann
Arbor?
Legionnaires of the University will have their
chance tonight to transfer tothe new post. Let's
make it the best Legion body in the country,,with
every Michigan ex-service man a member.
The Telescope

GRAHAM

TWO STORES

Open Evenings Until Christmas

B AH ENS AM
BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

.__..

_
}

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. mn. Aid
every two hours to 8:48 p.m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit- 555a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 1j:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 g.in., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12: 10 p.M.
h dA

f_ _I

.1

TUT TLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Out
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

II

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1:

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t.

I

DECEMBER
S M T W T
1 2
G 0 7 8 9
12 13 14 15 16
19 20 21 22 23
26 27 28 29 80

F
3
10
17
24
31

S
4
11
18
25

Ready to Serve
AT ANY-TIME
Open from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of rice
PLAIN CHOP SU EY
3 i CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Style
Short Orders
Qang Tum, Lo
6#3 E. Liberty St

Courteous 'and.:satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
liesonrees .........000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North UJniversity Ave.

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

1

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Persons wishing to 'secure infration concerning news for any
lssueof The Daily should see t night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1920.
. NightEditor-T. W. SARGENT, JR.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The University of Michigan Extension division
was organized in 1911. At the present time one
hundred eleven faculty members deliver three hun-
dred lectures a year, reaching every county in the
state. The twelve bureaus send out reading rat-
ter, supervise high school debates, care for the pub-
lic health in case of necessity, offer regular univer-
sity courses for full credit, and loan the services of
faculty men to municipalities where their advice is
invaluable in determining the course of public
projects.
THE EXTENSION SERVICE
Not many years ago' there were whole counties
in Michigan where the University of Michigan was
a fague institution "out there" which sometimes
broke into the news columns because its students
had committed some new asininity. Now all of
that has been changed, largely because of the serv-
ices rendered by the University of Michigan Ex-
tension division.,
The three main purposes of this division were
to acquaint the people of the state with their Uni-
Versity and its work, to give the faculty a more
adequate conception of the problems of the peo-
ple, and to make use of the University facilities to
the greatest possible extent in aiding the state to
solve its problems.
We may well be proud of the success of these
three measures under the administration of Profes-
sor Henderson. Our faculty members have in their
trips about the state become human beings'instead
of names to the people. The University is no
longer something intangible. It has become the
place where Professor So-and-So hold his classes.
'Oh, yes I know him. We had a long chat to-
gether the' last time he was down from Ann Ar-
bor." The professor on his side has in these chats
come to know the people, too, as human beings and
to appreciate the conditions under which they live.
The whole thing has been put upon a human basis
as opposed to its preceding institutional character.
In addition to this the towns and cities of the
state have been given sthe benefits of the work in
the .University laboratories and of the technical
skill of our instructors.
The. University has become to some extent the
workshop for the state of Michigan without in the
least decreasing its efficiency in its primary func-
tion, the instruction of Michigan students. This
undeniably is a worthy achievement.
SIR AUCKLAND GEDDES
Classes graduating from the University of Mich-
igan deserve the best that is to be had in the way
of commencement exercises, and it is probably with
this end in view that the authorities obtained Sir
Auckland Geddes, British ambassador to the United
States,'to deliver the commencement address.
Before the war Sir Auckland Geddes was active
in educational pursuits, serving as president of Mc-
Gill college, Montreal, Canada. While acting in
tltis capacity he was able to study the different
types of men and women found on every campus
mingle with them, ascertain their problems, and,

S CHUBERT
DETROIT
S0. .HERNDON
presents
CHRISTMAS
WILL BE HERE
IN THREE WEEKS
Your thoughts are already turn-
ing towards those Yuletide fes-
tivities to coime.
But will you be able to partici-
pate in them? When the even-
ing lights are glowing and all
are making merry, will you be
able to sing anddance with the
rest? Or must you sit idly by,
watching the others enjoy them-
selves?
I can't teach you to sing, but, I
will guarantee to teach you to
dange perfectly by Xmas, if you
see me at once. 1

Special Selections
OF
HOLIDAY GIFTS

for Men

We are showing an excellent' assortment of
Knitted Neckwear and Scarfs. The latter to
be had in both Wool and Silk and at prices
consistent with the times,

Clothes, Furnishings and Hats

TINKER

& COMPANY

STANDING
No. of Contribs
Men ...........230
Women .........69

Points
230
207

LE VERNE
HALSE.
STUDIOS
Hours: 15 -
Wuerth Arcade

M.
Y,'S

S. State St. at William St.

7.10
Ann Arbor

If Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned,
neither hath it any like a man ridiculed. The fin-
ger of scorn which has too long been pointed at
the men because of the inability to draw away from
the women in the Contest seems to have aroused
them to a superhuman effort and today finds them
leading once more.
"Drink to- me only with thine eyes,
I prithee do not wink,
I would not lose a single zlance;
It's all I have to drink."
Miss Represent.
Answers to Yesterday's Questions
1. Sing Sing is the highest mountain insthe
state of New York. Many men who have gone up
there often' do not come down again for several
years.
2. No, a Missulman is not always a strong man.
3. One of the means suggested by economists to
repopulate France is to require the people to eat
green annles and goon the whole population would
be douhled up.
4. The phrase "a human dynamo" is anplied to
all persons who have everything they wear charged.
5. We think Lord Bacon was acquitted at his
famous trial - the prosecutor couldn't prove that
he wrote Shakespeare's plays.
Angelina, our able contributor, recovered suffi-
ciently from that Eac. I bluebook to pen this
A green little ,freshman in his zreen little way,
A green little apnle did eat one day;
Now the zreen little grasses zracefully wave
O'er the green little freshman's green little grave.
Did This Ever Hap pe.- to You Also?
I occupied the pew alone,
She sat near. observant and still.
What could I do? I had no change
And so I dropped that dollar bill.
Pamous Closing Lines
"A well deljvered text," he muttered as lie saw
the minister throw the prayer book at the sleening
man. NOAH COUNT.

L 'I

f _

1-3 Off Suits and O'coats Sale 1-3 Off

The

Greatest Saving

Ever

Made

We have all been tempted by absurdly low prices, afterwards
learning that the price was very dear because Qf poor service.
You'll mak your greatest Saving when you buy your first
Suit of

I

Ftfr

Clothes

FOR YOUNG MEN

You've never enjoyed such satisfaction as permitted by Ftform
style and the elegance of Fitform tailoring. And Fitform serv-
ice-here is where you save money. Fitform Clothes are made
so well that an iron-bound guarantee of absolute satisfaction
goes with every garment.

Gordon Leather Coats $30.00

Cloth Hat $2.98

$S.00 Quality

Heavy Wool Hose $i..oo

Tom
116 E. Liberty St.
The Young l(ens Shop.,

Corbit

Between Main St. and 4th Ave.
Where FITFOA Clothes are Sold.

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