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December 10, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-10

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ATH ER

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ASSOCIATED
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VOL. XXXI. No. 67 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

LABOR DEPT. WILL
DETERMINE EXTENT
OF UNEMPLOYMENT
BELIEF PREVALENT THAT MANY
ARE IDLE THROUGHOUT -
COUNTRY
CLAIM 200,000 NEED
WORK IN MICHIGAN
John L. Lovett Says Detroit Manufac-
turers Do Not Expect Normal.
Business for a Year
(By Associated Press) -.
Washington, Dec. 9. - An inquiry'
to determine the extent of unemploy-
ment in 65 principal industrial cities
of the country was announced today
by the Department of Labor. Officials
would make no estimate today of the
country's idle workers although they
expressed the opinon that the trend
toward unemployment , on a large.
scale had been marked during the last
few months.
Many Needy in Michigan
Jackson, Dec. 9. - Half of the
unemployed men in Michigan, esti-
mated at a number nearly 200,000, are
"in actual need of work to avert suf-
fering," was the conclusion reached
in a meeting here today of managers
and secretaries of the Manufacturers
and Employers' association of a dozen
industrial cities of the state.
Resolutions were adopted calling
upon the governor to start work on
contemplated public improvements in
an effort to furnish relief, instead of
waiting anticipated reductions in cost
of materials. It was estimated that
$150,040,000 was now available for
such work.
Cities represented at the meeting
included Detroit, Battle Creek, Jack-
son, Saginaw, Muskegon, Flint, Pon-
tiac, Kalamazoo, Lansing, and Grand
Rapids.
Sew Business Revival
Statistics brought to the meeting by
representatives of these cities show
that of a total of 495,000 men normal-
ly employed in their industries 312,-
000 are now at work. Indications
were, it was said, that a revival of
industrial activities was not in imme-
diate prospect.
John L. Lovett, manager of the
Michigan Manufacturers' association,
told the conferees that Detroit manu-
facturers did not expect their busi-
ness to return to normal for more
than a year.
OSBON TO SPEAK ,ON
"LIFE AND1 KNOWLEDGE"
MUSICAL NUMBERS, THE PRAYER
AND SCRIPTURE READING
COMPRISE SERVICE
"Life and Knowledge" is the sub-
- ject on which Chase S. Osborn, ex-
governor and former Regent of the
University, will speak at the Univer-
sity service next Sunday night.
The rest of the. program will con-
sist of musical numbers, the prayer,
and the scripture reading. Music is
under the direction of William Wheel-
er, of the School of Music, who- has
provided a mixed quartette for this
service in contrast to the chorus and

solo work of other services. The
quartette consists of Mr. Wheeler,
Mrs. Wheeler, Doris Howe and Frank
Thomas, all of the School of Music.
Harry G. Mershon, associate min-
ister of the Congregational church,
is to give the opening prayer and to
read the scripture lesson. Earl V.
Moore, of the School of Music, will
be at the organ, and Chesset M.
Campbell, '21, will preside over the
meeting.
BEG YOUR PARDON

DETROIT ALUMNI
HONOR COACH YOST

-

"hDetroit alumni turned out to pay
their respects to Coach Fielding Yost
at the last smoker of the year, held
at the Cadillac hotel yesterday aft-
ernoon.
Harold Delbridge acted as toast-
master, and Fred Lawton, 11, was,
cheer leader.
Coach Yost, the principal speaker,
discussed the impractibility of play-
ing more than four big gaies, prom-
ised that the two year debt plus in-
terest which Michigan owes O. S. U.
wilf be paid in full on the gridiron
next October, and said: "I am wil ling
to bet that Chicago has already re-
gretted their scheduled game with
Princeton."
Yost complimented Goetz, saying
that he wasthebest tackle in the
Conference, that he was a real lead-
er, and that he worked, and worked
hard, not for the sake of the credit
he received, but for the team's suc-
cess.
DOCTORS PROPOSE
HEALTH CENTERS,
Medical Faculty Has Opposed State
Medicine and Health Insurance
Since March
PLAN SUGGESTED WILL GIVE
PROPER CARE AT LOW RATE
Community health centers organ-
ized in a systematic manner for the,
purpose of giving to the average in-
dividual advantages offered by the ,
medical science, but at a moderate
cost, were proposed by the University i
medical faculty in a recent meeting.;
In regard to the rumor circulated
through the medical profession of the
state that the University hospital
staff favored state medicine, Dr. C. G.
Parnall says: "As far back as March
the medical faculty went on record as
being opposed to state medicin and
health insurance, and offered in its
place the establhment of communi-
ty health centers."
No State Authority
The details of the plan, diering
from the common conception 'or state
medicine, provide for no state au-
thority over the physicians in charge
and safeguard them against the loss
of their professional individuality. It
Is entirely with the object o giving
to the average individual modern med-
ical service at a price that he can af-
ford, according to the promoters of
the plan.
It is recognized that aside uom the
comparatively small groups at either
end of the economic scale, the mass
of people are receiving mediocre
medical attention at a cost beyond
their ability to pay. This difficulty
will be avoided under the system ad-
vocated. By distributing the cost over
the community as a whole, health
centers would be erected with the ad-
vantages of the best possible group
service in the way of diagnosis and
treatment of disease. Well-equipped
buildings and hospitals with adequate
staffs and maintaining a satisfactory
character of service would be encour-
aged.
Precaution Urged
Every. 'precaution against the cen-
ters coming under political influence
is urged. Members of the health serv-
ice would be adjudged competent by
disinterested groups or boards. The
whole organizaztion would be co-or-
dinated, and the adminstration cen-
tralized so that competition would be
encouraged and merit duly recog-

nized.
C. W. WOOD TELLS OF THREE
FACTORS IN CARBUERATION
Illustrating his talk with pictures
and graphs, C. W. Wood of the me-
chanical engineering department ex-
plained how carbueration was effect-
ed by three different factors in his
talk on "Carbueration" last night be-
fore the student branch of the Amer-
ican Society of Mechanical Engineers.

THOMASON SPEAKS
HERE SUNDAY ON
NEWSPAPER' GAMEI
MEETING TO BE FIRST OF SERIES
OF TALKS CONDUCTED-
BY UNION
SPitAKER IS MANAGER
OF CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Idea of
to

This and
Acquains
Various

Following Lectures
Students with
Vocations

Stating its intention of bringing to
Ann Arbor men who are the ac-
knowledged national leaders in vari-
ous business enterprises and profes-
sions; the Union yesterday announc-
ed Emory Thomason, 104, business
manager of the Chicago Tribune, as
the speaker Sunday at the first of a
series of Sunday afternoon meetings.
to be held at various intervals in the
next few months.
Prominent Men to Follow
Charles M. Schwab, prominent in
the steel industry, has been asked to
speak at a later date, as well as such
men as William B. Starrett, vice-
president of the George A. Fuller Con-
struction company, of New York; Dr.
Copeland, health commissioner of New
York City; and William D. McKenzize,
head of the legal staff of the Quaker
Oats company, of Chicago.
In an effort to acquaint students
with the opportunities and advantag-
es as well as the disadvantages of
his particular business or profession,
each speaker will endeavor to present
it in a manner which will enable men
to decide exactly what they wish to
follow after leaving the University.
Union Desires to Help Students
"The Union wants to be of practi-
cal help and every effort has been
made to get big men. Many students
are not sue of the definite work they
wish to take up, and this Is the only
way we know of helping them along
this line," said Paul Eaton, '21, pres-
ident of the Union, yesterday.
While each speaker will present
particularly his own line of work, the
talks will be broad enough to 14terest
everyone. They are to be informal
and will not last more than an hour.
"The Newspaper Game" will be the
subject of Mr. Thomason's talk Sun-
day afternoon at 3:30 o'clock in the
assembly hall of the Union. He will
give experiences and practical point-
ers on newspaper work. One musical
number is the only other event on the
program.
EASTERN GRID GAE
FAORED__BY COUNCIL
RESOLUTION TO BE PRESENTED
TO BOARD IN CONTROL
SATURDAY
Campus opinon as to whether Mich-
igan should have a football game with
an Eastern institution will be pre,
sented to the Board in Control of
Athletics at its meeting Saturday night
in the form of a resolution passed by
the Student council that such a con-
test is desired.
The council has unanimousiy pass-
ed a resolution favoring a football
game with some Eastern school and
goes on record as favoring competi-
tion with Eastern schools In other
forms of athletics. Opinions express-
ed by various members of the coun-
cil at its meeting Wednesday indicate
that the student body heartily endors-
es Eastern competition.
A committee appointed by the coun-
cil has consulted with the athletic au-
thorities, and further action will prob-
ably be taken Saturday night.
Local discussion has been augment-
ed by the favor with which such a
move is regarded in the East. Let-
ters have been received by the pres-
ident of the council from alumni as-
sociations of various New England
states, all of whom are boosting the
idea.
Lloyd George to Talk on Ireland

London, Dec. 9.-It is announced
that Premier Lloyd George will makE
an important statement on Ireland or
the opening of the house of commonE
a110011 Friday,

KUBELIK HERE FOR
RECITAL MONDAY
Jan Kubelik, the violinist who will
appear, next Monday evening at Hill
auditorium in the Choral Union ser-
ies, is now conducting his sixth Amn-
erican tour. Because of the war this
tour has been delayed, the artist hav-
ing been compelled to remain in
Czecho-Slovaka until after the arm-
istice was signed. During this time
he composed three violin concertos
which were rendered in Vienna and
Prague..
Kubelik has been awarded the Bee-.
thoven medal by the London Phil-
harmonic orchestra and the medal of
the legion of honor by the French re-
public in recognition of his musical
successes. He will appear in most of
the larger cities of Canada and the
daited States in the course of his pre-
sent six months' tour.
BOARDIGHOUSES
CAN CUT PRICES
-GROCER
Local Restaurant Reduces Weekly
Cost of Board from $ to $7,
S031 Making Money
LARD PRODUCTS, BUTTER, TAKE
DECIDED DROP SINCE MONDAY
"Boarding houses could immediate-
ly reduce prices 50 cents to $1 a
week because of cheaper groceries,
meats, and other food stuffs," stated
William Schultz, proprietor of a State
street grocery store, yesterday. The
statement was given when his opin-
ion was asked whether the drop in
grocery prices had been sufficient to
warrant a reduction by the boarding
houses.
At least one Ann Arbor boarding
house believes it can be done, for it
was learned yesterday that one house
had lowered its price for three meals
a day from $8 a week. to .$7, while
for two meals it is charging only $6
compared with $7 last week. "We
took this action because we can now
buy cheaper. We are serving only
the best and making money, too," said
the manager.
Serves Excellent Meal
Last. night. that house served roast
beef and roast pork, mashed potatoes
and gravy, side dishes of peas, bread
and butter, pickles, tea, coffee, milk
or cocoa, and a choice of rhubarb or
cream pie. Noon meals and break-
fasts are of the same relative quali-
ty. Ice cream and cake are served
once a week. Breakfast orders in-
clude one egg. Boarders-- can have
additional helpings at every meal.
Announcing a lowering of price in
everything except eggs, a South Uni-
versity cafeteria 'yesterday aligned it-
self with the cafeteria's decreasing
prices. Dinners for whichlvthey for-
merly obtained 70. cents, are -now
bringing ,50 cents. Sunday chicken
dinners are now 65 cents instead of
$1 Explaining how this could be
done, the owner said: "By buying
carefully we can lower our prices con-
siderably and still make money.
Meats and sugar, especially, are
cheaper. steaks and chops have
dropped 5 cents and hamburger sand-

wiches are 10 cents instead of 15
cents.
Coffee and Milk for 5 Cents
Pointing out that money could be
made selling milk and coffee for 5
cents each, to which price many caf-
eterias have dropped only recently,
C. 'L. Starbuck, of a Liberty street
cafeteria, said yesterday: "We have
been . selling milk and . coffee for 5
cents straight since the middle of Au-
gust, and are making money. Part of
the time others were getting 10 cents

PROSPECTS FOR SUCCESS OF UNION
SSWIM'MING POOL CAMPAIGN BRIGH *TEN
'DRIVE TO OTNEONE MORE U

a

SUPPORT OF I.0. T.C. -
GIVEN BY LOCAL AERO CLUB
Unanimous support of the work of
the R. O. T. C. unit was voted by Mich-
igan Aero club, at a meeting in the
Union last night.
Plans were madesfor a get-together
banquet after the holidays.
MANYA ER PRESIDENT
IN TAO LANSING TAKS
DR. BURTON STRESSES NEED OF
UNIVERSITY FOR LARGE f
BUDGET
(Special to The Daily)
Lansing, Dec. 9. - Michigan's cap-
ital welcomed tonight President Mar-
ion L. Burton, who spoke at two
meetings which turned away hun-
dreds. At 6 o'clock the Teachers' as-
sociation gave a banquet for him in
the Masonic temple. Seven hundred
attended, the majority being Mich-
gan alumni. At 8:30 o'clock the
President spoke at a mass meeting
at Prude auditorium, at which there
were 3,500 townspeople.
In his first speech President Burton
said that the first duty of the state
was to provide a strong state govern-
ment, after which its next concern
was the care of its dependents. These
two are the otly functions which
should take precedence over the needs
of the state educational institutions,
according to the President.I
Stressing the importance of the re-'
cent University budget, the President
said: "I prefer to be. president of a
university that is close to the people.
I think the University of Michigan
has been the greatest university in the
country. Either the state of Michi-
gan must appropriate the money that
is needed or the state must concede
that it wants its University to drop
into second or third class."
Conditions in the Medical school
were called intolerable by the Presi-
dent. He pictured the lack of room
and facilities necessary and said that.
under these conditions, the state was
trying to make "physicians to watch
over the health and welfare of your
family and mine."
INQUIRY TO PRECEDE NAVY
CONSTUCTION BY ENGLAND
London, Dec. 9. - No program of
capital ship construction for the navy
will be presented to parliament until
the whole question of naval strength
as effected by the latest developments
in naval warfare has-been exhaustive-
ly inquired into by the committee on
imperial defense and the results of
the inventigation have been consider-
ed.
This announcement was made in
the house of commons tonight by J.
Austen Chamberlain. Mr. Chamber-
lain's announcement was the outcome
of debate arising from an attack on
the government's expenditures as
" wasteful and from agitation raised by
the exponents of a naval policy that
would furnish a navy equal to the
combined forces of the United States
and Xapan
Pep and Spleeches at Soph Lit Smoker
Pep, jazz, and enthusiasm reigned
supreme at the Sophomore smoker
last night at the Union. The usual ci-
der, doughnuts and cigarets were
provided, while "Nobe" Weatherbee
and his coterie of jazz -artsts furnish-
ed the music. Short speeches were
made by Dean Jehn R. Effinger and
Claude L. Benner.

Sophomore Engineers Attend Smoker
Two hundred sophomore engineerE

TONIGHTS MARGIN EXPECTED
TO BE OVER NECESSARY
GOAL
1,048 PLEDGE CARDS
FOR $19,656 RECEIVED
0rganization for Securing Funds to
Be Carried on Through Aid
of Sectional Clubs
Prospects for the success of the Un-
ion preliminary pledge campaign in.
connection with the Christmas swim-
ming pool drive brightened consid-
erably last, night when a late check-
showed a total of $19,656 pledged.
This spurt on the second day of.the
campaign has induced the officials to
continue the work one more day, and
they expect tonight's final count will
show a comfortable margin over the
sum needed.
More than 900 pledge cards were
turned in at the Union last night, and
this makes the total for the two days,
1,048.
Sidney D. Moeller, '21, reported the
largest number of pledges signed, his
total being 26. J. R. Riford, '23, was
second with 20 cards. Harry T.
Walker, '23, won individual honors in
the amount of money pledged with a
total of $1,085, while A. J. Parker, '23,
came next with $600.
The first actual money - subscrip-
tions were reported yesterday when
Kenneth Hoag, '24, turned in $9
which he had obtained in a solicita-
tion of five graduates of the Univer-
sity who reside in Ann Arbor.
To provide an organization for the
work of raising the funds in the var-
ious parts of the country when the
holiday campaign starts, Maynard
Newton, '22, chairman of the commit-
tee for the pool fund, has requested
that the presidents of the Sectional
clubs- get in touch with him to plan
the co-operation that their clubs can
furnish. It is expected that much of
the success of the drive will be due
to the efforts of the sectional. organi-
zations.
FIRST DAY TICKET SLE
FR "MINSTRELSY" GOOD
DEEBACH OF HYPNOTIC FAME TO
BE ONE OF END MEN IN
PRODUCTION
Reserved seat tickets for the Glee.
and Mandolin club production, "Mm-
strelsy," to be given at the Whitney
theater Wednesday, Thursday and.
Friday evenings of next week, went
on sale at the Union yesterday morn-
ing. A long line had formed -before
the opening hour, and there was a
good sale throughout the day.
The sale will be continued frot 9
to 12 and from 2 to 5 o'clock today
and from 9 to 12 o'clock tomorrow
morning at the Union.
One of 'the end men for the produc.
tion is Robert F. Deebach, '23D, who
put on the hypnotic act in the recent
Spotlight vaudeville. Little is being
divulged as to the part that Deebach-
will play in "Minstrelsy," but the
director, E. Mortimer Shuter, has stat-
ed that Deebach will be given every
opportunity to display his talent and
originality.
Appearing in the opening skit of the
second act,- "Macbeth with Varia-
tions," Deebach will play the comical

role of "Mister Macduff."

Expenses of the cooks, cashier, and
buyer are not included in the cost of
the meals -served at the Michigan
State telephone local exchange, as
stated in yesterday's Daily. The
price, 20 cents, covers only the rawv
cost of the food, all overhead being
paid by the telephone company.
The purpose of the cafeteria, ac-
cording to J. J. Kelly, manager, ie to
improve the working conditions of
the employes and not to make money.

for milk and coffee, making $1.26 almet I~t night in the Union In their

t
r
T

Dr. Hainisch Chosen Austrian Pres..
Vienna, Dec. 9.-Dr. Michael Hain;
isch was today elected president of
Austria by the national assembly. He
is a prominent socialist and wqs
elected a member of the Austrian par-
liament in 1909.

case on milk.
Chief among the declines in tood
stuffs yesterday,- drop in lard and
lard products and butter. The for-
mer are selling now for 20 cents a
pound, a drop of 5 cents this week.
Five months ago lard was at from 30
to 32 cents. The- wholesale price of
butter yesterday was 53 cents, show-
ing a.decline 'of 4 cents- a pound since
Monday.

first cooker of the year. Cider and
doughnuts were served and a program
of m'lc provided. The smoker was
given free of charge.
Princeton's Athletics Lose $3,101.5
Princeton, Dec. 9.-Princeton's ath-
letic year ending July 31 showed - a
deficit of $3,101.53, according to the
financial statement issued tonight by
the Athletic association.

BOXING CLUB TO HEAR DR. MAY
AT FIRST MEETING OF YEA
Boxing from the viewpoint of tb
man in college will be discussedI
Dr. A. G. May, gymnasium directo
at the first meeting this year of t
Boxing club at 7:30 o'clock tonigl
n room 302 of-the Union. Several p
titions for admission to the club w
be considered in the business iee
ing. -

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