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December 09, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-09

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R

AIN OR SNOW

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
i'AV AND NIGHT lURAE
SERlVICE

TODAY

-

XI. No56. .

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1920.

PRICE FIVE

REPORTS SHOW
POOL DRIVE IS
L6N A Y
ONLY 147 CARDS TURNED IN AT
10:80 O'CLOCK LAST
NIGHT
BUT $3,000 PLEDGED
FIRST DAY OF DRIVE
Students do Not Realize That Pledges
Are Used for Statistical Pur-
pos'es Only; Not Binding
Late reports ,from the' preliminary
pledge campaign which the Union is
conducting to raise funds for the
swimming pool were discouraging in
the extreme, only $3,000 in pledges
having been received at 10:30 o'clock
last night. This. is the total shown
by the 147 cards that were turned in
and it is but a small percentage of
the lmount necessary to put the pool
in shape.
Officials"of the drive expressed the
lrpe that many more pledges had'
been made but had not been reported
to the Union, but even considering the
possibility, they were greatly 'dissat-
isfied with the result.
Purdue Goes Over
Ent'vorable comparisons have been
made of the record made by Purdue
university in its recent campaign for
a memorial union building and the
result of .the Michigan swimming pool
drive thus far. At Purdue more than
$400,000 was donated to the fund by
a student body of less than 2,500.
Here, where no attempt has been
made to obtain money from students.
where students have only been re-
quested to raise funds from the alum-
ni and from their friends in their
home twns, the first day of the
campaign shows a total of $3,000
pledged.
Must Have Every Man
No reports from the fraternities
and house clubs, have been received,
with one exception. Officials re-
quest that these reports be turned in
as soon as possible tomorrow. The
returns from this source should bol-
ster up the showing considerably, as
practically all the houses are slated
.to go 100 per cent. But this factor
alone will not put the drive over.
Without the co-operation of every
man on the campus there is no pos-
sibility of realizing the Union's hopes
of getting the pool finished in time
for use this year.
T. B. Wheatly,. '24, returned the
greatest number of cards last night,
his total being 15. The high individ-
ual honors for the largest money to-
tal went to A. J. Parker, '23, whose
pledges amounted to $465.
Not Binding
- Considerable difficulty was encoun-
tered last night by the solicitors in
combating the misunderstanding that
is quite general on the campus in re-
gard to the obligation incurred by the
pledge. The pledges are requested
only for statistical purposes. No man
(Continued on Page Eight)
DUES NOW PAYABLE
Today is the last chance to
pay senior lit dues. They will
be received this afternoon in Un-
iversity hall from 2 to 4 o'clock.

All dues must be paid before
one can graduate.
Sophomore engineers dues
will be payable on the second
floor of the Engineering build-

TO GIVE MOVIE AT
HILL AUDITORIUM
Announcing a movie at Hill audi-
torium next Tuesday, Dec. 14, the
student committee on athletic affairs,
Robert Cook, '21E, chairman, yester-
day made public for the first time its
purpose of raising funds to carry on
its work.
"The committee was quite. embar-
rassed the past year because of in-
sufficient funds, and the widening
field of activity has made the need of
funds greater than ever. If this work
for better athletics at Michigan is to
continue, we must have funds," said
Cook.
Besides a five-reel feature and a
comedy never, before shown in Ann
Arbor, there will be music by a cam-
pus quartette and a popular orches-
tra. Tickets, which will sell for 50
cents, go on sale tomorrow morn-
ing.
LOA.AFTRA

START REVISION
Of TARIFF LAWSI

JANE MAN\ER SECURED BY ORATORICAL
ASSOCIATION TO FILL VACANT DATE

Rep. Fordney
Begin Soon;
come Tax

Announces Hearings
Would ReVise In-
on Corporations

Boarding Houses Fail to Show
Inclination Toward Lower
Prices

Any

PHONE -CO. MAKES MONEY
SERVING GOOD 20c MEALS
Continuing its investigations of
food prices, The Daily yesterday
found that Ann Arbor cafeterias have
announced a reduction in the price of
some dishes which are most fre-
quently ordered. This action has been
taken, they say, to. give the students
the benefit of the sharp drop in food
products. since mid-summer.
Boarding houses, however, are not
inclined to make any immediate de-
crease in their prices, claiming that
production costs and overhead charg-
es will not permit. Featuring yester-
day's inquiry was the disclosure that
the local branch of the Michigan
State Telephone company is serving
meals to its employes at a flat rate of
20 cents, representing cost.
Confined to Staples
State street cafeterias are now
serving coffee at 5 cents, a 7 cent
rate formerly prevailing.- One cafe-
teria has reduced milk from 7 cents
to 5 cents, but others have not yet
followed. Baked apples and apple
sauce have also taken a drop of 25
per cent, coming at 8 cents now in-
stead of 10. At the Union, the tap
room announces a drop in potatoes
from 10 to 7 cents.
That there will be further declines
in prices after the Christmas vacation
was freely predicted by all the cafe-
terias. - Potatoes, especially, and
meats which have already lowered a
little, are expected to cost the stu-
dent less when he returns after the
holidays.
Chubb's Prices Fixed
Chubb's is getting $7 per week for
two meals and $8.50 for, three, and
the proprietor claims he is making no
money at this price. No lowering of
price for the rest of the year can be
seen there unless the "bottom drops
out of everything." The same opin-
ion prevails at Freeman's.
"Competent cooks always cost the
same. Every man in the kitchen is
a trained man. On a $1 meal, it costs
us 40 cents for overhead, which means
that is what it costs us before we
place any food before the customer,"
said Dennis Donovan, steward at the
Union, whose opinon it was that din-
ing room prices there would see no
decrease the rest of the college year.
20' Cent Meals Good
Instituting a cafeteria for employes
only, Manager J. J. Kelly, of the lo-
cal branch of the Michigan Telephone
company, is having meals served for
(Continued on Page Eight)

CLAIMS KOUSTON'S ESTIMATE
OF EXPENSES IS TOO HIGH
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 8. - Republican
members of congress took the first
steps today towardtrevision of tax
and tariff laws at the extra session
to be called soon after March 4.
Chairman Fordney, of the house
ways and means committee, announc-
ed that the committee would begin
hearing within a few days on revi-
sion of the tax laws. The senate fi-
nance committee will call for similar
hearings. Chairman Fordney said to-
day that he had in mind a definite
plan for simplification of the tax on
corporation incomes. One of these
proposals is a fiat tax on the incomes
of all corporations "having no quali-
fication or other modifying provi-
sions." '
Would Simplify Tax
Mr. Fordney also said it was his
desire "that the income tax laws be
made so simple that no corporation
would have to hire an expert or law-
yer to 'figure out how much it owes
the government."
The ways and means chairman de-
clared that a study of Secretary
Houston's report "had shown him
that the estimates for governmental
expenditures are ridicuously high."
"I can go down the list of the sec-
retary and chop off approximately a
million and a quarter dollars that is
unnecessary," Mr. Fordney said.
Pass Bills
The first legislative action of the
house at this session was taken today
with the passage of a bill authoriz-
ing the President to issue medals of
merit for distinguished service per-
formed during the World war by of-
ficers and men of "the United States
merchant marine. The second piece
of legislation was a bill designed
principally to prevent deception of the
public in the purchase of manufac-
tured articles wrapped or boxed so
as to make them appear of greater
size or quantity than the contents are
by actual weight or volume. The bill
requires that the quality or contents
be marked on the outside of the con-
tainer.
Just Five Years
Come This March
Up in the Homoeopathic hospital
there is a youngster who is curious.
He's just a little fellow "five come
March"-and so he should be curious
at this time of the 4year. And then
there isn't a great deal for him to do,
for he is a hunch.back, and hunch-
backs can't romp and skip the rope
like other children do. So he sits
and wonders.
Every morning the boy makes a
trip. That is the event of the day to
him. You see he is not very strong,
so most of his time is spent lying still
in bed. But once each day he is al-
lowed to walk a short distance. Where
would you go if you were given but 15
minutes on your feet each day?
~He figured out what he would do
with his 15 minutes some time ago.
Down at the end of the hall is the of-
fice of the social worker. She is his
best friend; she is sort of mother and
daddy too, because he doesn't remem-
ber his real parents.
So Billy trudges down the hall to
the' office. It takes five minutes to
make the journey for he insists on
walking alone and the hall is a long
one for a fellow that doesn't get much
practice at walking.
And he enters the open door and
asks: "Ain't it most time for Santa
Claus to come now, Aunt Mumsy?"

Old Custom of Lining Up to Be
hered to in Distribution of
Seats

PRODUCTION DECLARED TO
OUTDO ALL PREVIOUS ONES
Reverting to the old custonm of: lin-
ing up for tickets, reserved seats for
the Glee and Mandolin club produc-
tion, "Minstrelsy," will go on sale
from 2 to 5 o'clock today at the Un-
ion. Seats may also be obtained from
9 to 12 and 2 to 5 o'clock on Friday,
and from 9 to 12 o'clock Saturday at
the Union. Prices for seats are, $1.50
and $1. There is no: war tax.
The policy which will be follow-
ed is that of selling tickets to men
in the order of their arrival at the
Union desk. No more than six seats
will be sold to one person.
Hundreds Tried Out
The production, "Minstrelsy," in
which the combined musical-clubs will
make their. bow to the campus, will
be staged on the evenings of Wednes-
day, Thursday, and Friday of next
week at the Whitney theater. The min-
strel show is under the direction of
E. Mortimer Shuter, director of past
Union operas, and the offering is pre-
sented. under the auspices of the Un-
ion.
From -the hundreds of tryouts a
cast, chorus, and orchestra of 121 have
been selected. They have been work-
ing daily with Mr. Shuter for the
past month and the coming week is
to be devoted to putting the finishing
touches on a production which critics
declare to be unusual.
Better Than Formerly
A large expenditure has been nec-
essary to put "Minstrelsy" on, and
a correspondingly large ticket sale is
hoped for to insure the success of the
venture. In past years the Union min-
strel show was always looked forward
to and reports indicate that his -year's
production is better in every detail
than former ones-.
ORGANIZATIONS TO -OUTFIT,
ENTERTAIN LOCAL CHILDREN

Miss Jane Manner, of New York
City, has been secured 'by the Orator-
ical association to speak here on
Dec." 18, the date left vacant by the
death of Leland T. Powers. Though
the exact subject of her entertain-
ment cannot be announced till a later
date, it is .certain that she will give
a reading of one of Brieux's cele-
brated plays.,
Louis Sherwin, dramatic editor of
the. -New York. Globe, says of Miss
Manner: "Last Friday morning she
gave a reading of Brieux's 'False,
MINSTREL SHOW
TICKETS ON SL

Gods' at the Waldorf. Many people
might well prefer this to seeing a
regular production of the piece." Aft-
er Miss Manner had given a reading
of "The Red' Robe," Eleanor Gates,
author of "The Poor Little Rich
Girl," said in the New York Times:
"I cannot even remember the names
of the plays I saw that season cr
their characters, but 'The Red Robe'
as interpreted by Miss Manner ives
for me as if 1I had seen it yester-
day."
Miss Manner has given readings in
most of the large cities of thetcoun-
try. On the same program with the
Cincinnati Symphony orchestra she
read "A Midsummer Night's Dream"
at Carnegie's hall, New York. She
has also appeared at the University
of Cincinnati, at a special matinee at
the Little theater, New York, at the
Cooper Union forum, New York, and
before Women's clubs in the 13 larg-
est cities in the United States.
In an account of one of Miss Man-
ner's recitals in Baltimore, J. O.
Lambdin, dramatic editor of the Bal-
timore Sun, said: "Briefly, Jane Man-
ner is an artist."
PRE. UTNHAs BUSY
PROCSM REST OF, WEEK

Ad-

WILL MAKE TWO ADDRESSES
BATTLE CREEK AND TWO
IN LANSING

IN

HOU0STON MKE
ANNUAL ,REPORT
FOR TREAS URY
URGES IMMEDIATE REVISION OF
NATION'S TAX LAWS
ON WAR BASIS
SUGGESTS REPEAL OF
SOME EXISTING TAXES
Makes Statement Regarding Lans to
Foreign Countries and Speaks
of Payments
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 8.-Immediate re-
'vision of the nation's tax la's on the
basis of an annual levy of $4,000,-
000,000 for n period of four years, and
including an increase of two per cent
in the taxes on incomes up to $5,000,
is urged by Secretary Houston in his
annual report sent today to congress.
Repeal of the 'excess profits taxes,
elimination of certain of the so-call-
ed luxury taxes, including the levy on
soda fountain and similar beverages,
and a readjustment of the rates. in
the higher groups of income taxes, Is
proposed by the treasury chief. To
meet the losses brought about by
these proposed changes, Mr. Houston
recommends revised and new taxes
to yield about $2,000,000,000 as fol-
lows:
Proposes Readjustment of Taxes
In the readjustment of surtaxes,
Mr. Houston proposes the division of
incomes into "saved" or reinvested
and "spent." On the former class he
would limit the highest tax to 20 per
cent, while the income spent would
be subjected to a tax ranging as high
as 50 per cent. Under the plan pro-
posed by the secretary, incomes be-
tween $5,000 and $6,000 would be tax-
ed 2 per cent on the part saved and
the same on the part spent. The same
ratio with a graduated increase would
apply to incomes up to $30,000, where
the maximum of 20 per cent on saved
income is reached. From $30,000 to
$40,000, the. rates .would be 20 per
cent on saved and 25 per cent on
spent; $40,000 to $50,000, 20 per cent
and 30 per cent; $50,000 to $75,000, 20
per cent and 35 per cent; $75,000 to
$100,000, 20 per cent and 40 per cent,
and over $100,000, 20 per cent and 50
per cent or a total tax of 70 per
cent.
Says 70 Per Cent Tax Unproductive
The present maximum rate is 70
per cent on incomes of $1,000,000, but
Mr. Houston declares it has "long
passed the point of its minimum pro-
ductivity" since it encourages the in-,
vestment in tax-exempt securities. 16e
says the "only effective way to tax
the rich is tso adopt rates that. do not
force investment 'in tax-exempt se-
curities."
The new rates while not laying as
.high a levy against the great incomes
will, the secretary expects, produce
a greater return to the government
since the wealthy class will not end
it profitable to invest in bonds of
states, countries, or municipalities
(Continued on Page Eight)

There is a busy speaking program1
ahead of President Marion L. Bur-i
ton for the remainder of this week.r
He goes to Lansing this afternoon to
speak to the teachers of the public
schools of that city. At 6:30 o'clock1
this evening he will speak at a ban-
quet of Michigan alumni and teach-l
ers of the Lansing schools. The ban-1
quet will be held in the Masonic tem-o
ple.
"The Aim of American Education"'
is the subject of an address .he will
deliver in Lansing Friday morning
before the high school princip'als'i
section. of the Michigan State Teach-
ers' association.
From Lansing he goes to Battle
Creek to make two addresses. Friday
at noon he will speak before the meet-]
ing of the bankers of southwestern
Michigan. That afternoon he will talk
on educational problems to the Teach-'
ers' institute of Calhoun county. t
A conference of university presi-
dents in Chicago on Saturday morn-
ing concludes his itinerary.l
Accompanying President Burton to1
Lansing will be Dean W. H. Buttsl
and Irof. A. H. White, of the Engi-i
neering faculty. Dean Butts and Pro-,
fessor White will address the conven,
tion at its regular Friday and Satur-I
day sessions on "Possible Change of"
Entrance Requirements to the .Uni-
versity of Michigan College of Engi-
neering," and "The Co-ordination of
Courses Given by High School Ju-
nior Colleges and the University of
Michigan College of Engineering."
NEW LEGION POST
CH AR TER ARRIVES
The chatrer for the University of
Michigan post of the American Legion
has arrived, according to Prof. H. N.
Cole, who is in charge of the organ-
ization procedure.
A meeting preliminary to the reg-
ular organization of the post will be
held at 7:30 o'clock Friday evening,
Dec. 10, in room 151 of the Chemistry
building. All interested are invited
to attend especially those who have
signed the application for the charter.
The post was established because
students spend the greater part of
the year here and would, therefore,
derive the most benefit from a local
organization. Transfers may be made
to any other post when a member
graduates or leaves the University.

Christmas Parties Are Included
Extensive Holiday
Plans

In

Tyenty-nine fraternities, 13 sororI-
ties, and 6 dormitories 'have been fur-
nished with the names of from one
to three children to outfit and en-
tertain at a Christmas party. Organ-
izations that have not sent In-for any
definite . assignment may procure
names by calling Hulda Bancroft,
at 93.7=W or 996-R.
A list of eight boys from 10 to 14
years of age who do not need an en-
tire outfit of ' clothes but who would
appreciate a party may be obtained
from the committee..
Each organization is privileged to.
set the date for its own party. Chil-
dren: invited, to these parties will not
receive invitations to the party at
Lane hall.
The Wuerth clothing store has' of-
fered a special discount on boys'
clothing.. These prices may be ob-
tained 'by calling for Albert Fiegel.

:r

hi

i
i
t
i

FRATERNITY SWIMMING
NOTICE

The following fraternities
compete at 7:45 o'clock tonight
the interfraternity swimming
meet: Delta Upsilon, Sigma
Phi Epsilon, Chi Psi, Delta Kap-
pa Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Lambda
Chi Alpha, Phylon, Nu Sigma'
Nu, Psi Upsilon, Theta Chi, Al-
pha Tau Omega, Theta Delta
Chi, Phi Kappa Sigma, Zeta Psi,
Alpha Delta Phi, Sigma Alpha
Epsilon. No less than three men
to a team. Four men deeded if
house enters relay.

I

ing from 8 to 5
Freshman lit
in University
Saturday from
Friday from 9

o'clock today.
dues are payable
hall today and,
11 to 12 o'clock
to 10 o'clock.

I

Tickets at Union
"ox Offle
Thurs. Deo. 9
2-5; 7.9;
Friday, Dec. 10
942; 2-6;
Saturday, Dec.11
9-12

_...j-

The Michigan Union Anuounces
The Musical Club in

"eeMINSTRELSy"

THE White y hetr, desday"- Th, Iu~5rsdyand riday,

PRICES:
Entire Lower
Floor and First 4
Rows of Balcony
$1.50
Balano6 of
Baloony
$1.00 (no war tax)

AL.L SEATS -RESERVED
TICKETS NOW ON SALE at the UNION

DECEMBER 15

-16

- 17

First Appearance of the 'Varsity Glee and Mandolin Clubs This Year

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