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December 07, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-07

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[E MICHIGAN D

L..i

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER') THE UNIVERSITY
'01? MIC'IGAN-
Published every morning except Mondgy during the Univ
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
'he :associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use f
blication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwi
ted in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as seco
matter,
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
.hones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the s
*e not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence
. and notices of events will be published in The Daily at .t
etion of the Fditor, if left at or. mailed to The Daily ofti
gned communications will receive no consideration. No mai
pt will be returned -unless the writer incloses postage.
lhe Daily does not necessarily 'endorse the sentiments w
sed in the communications.
'What'sGoing On" notices wil not be received after 8 o'clo
ie evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
rAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE 0. BROPHY j

er-
for
rise
nd
cig-
of
he
ce.
an-
xa-
ck
R.

a'

s Editor..............................Chesser M. Campbe.ll
ht Editors-
T. H. Adams El. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherw~ood
ay Editor .......................J A. Bernstein
arials. .......Lee Woodruff, Robert'Sage, T. ..Whinery
stant News ... ....................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
is ..................................... ° Robert- Angell
.nen'slEditor.......................... .....Mary D. Lane
graph ........................+*.............West Gallogly
scope ......................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
phine Waldo Byron Darnton H. E. Howlet
G. Weber Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klaver
ena Barlow Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
beth Vickery Leo . Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
. Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beats Hasley
ge Reinde ' Iughston MeBain Kathrine Montgomery
thy Monfort Frank H. McPike Gerald P. Overton
y B. Grundy J. A. Bacon Edward Lambrecht
ces Oberholtzer W. W. Ottaway Willian H. Riley Jr.
rt E. Adams Paul Watzel Sara Waller
nan C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
NES8 MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
"ising.....................................:: :. . Joyce
ieds........................................ Robt. 0. Kerr
ation........................ .............. I: riath
nts ........................ ..........EF. R. 'riehs
tion .. ... ....................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
nid Kunstater Robt. L. "Davis iios. L. Rice
W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slnw "nr
amel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

the sense in demanding a championship year be-
fore we make the arrangement, when that ar-
rangement is to last indefinitely and supremacy is
only a temporary matter?
As to the question of prestige, few there would
be who would claim that victory over a great East-
ern university will not bring natinal renown to
Michigan, and much greater prestige than the sec-
tional competition whih limits our present activi-
ties. Eastern alumni have repeatedly advised us
of the high esteem in which our former athletic re-
lations with the East had placed Michigan. It is
time to revive this esteem.
The claim that an Eastrrn football game would
detract from theseason's drawig-power seems un-
tenable. Demand for sents at all the -big games are
fa' in excess of accommodations, and the same
people frequently attend. all the principal encoun-
ters of the season. Rexuembering the crowds at
Eastern games of the past, it seems as though, with
our prestige already enhanced through stiff compe-
titior in the Conference, we should expect such an
intersectional contest to be a still greater drawing-
card in the future, particularly if it be with such a
team as Yale.
Re-entrance into the track intercollegiates and the
scheduling of °a football game and one or more
baseball games with the East should be the cardi-
nal points of Michigan's immediate athletic policy.
THAT AUSTRIAN DRIVE
Vigorous comment has been excited during the
last week by the announcement of oversubscrip-
tion of the drive for funds for needy Austrian
students; and-two opposing views on the matter
have been convincingly presented.
As both the two professors who condemn the
campaign and the professor and "doughboy" who
uphold it, agree that as a general proposition to as-
sist suffering fellow beings is a fine act of hu-
manity regardless of their crimes, the conflict of
opinion largely centers around the question' of
whether, in viw of the part the Austrians played
in the wanton desolation of France, it is right to
give them money to alleviate their hardships re-
sulting from the war.
It is highly probable that the matter would have
received much less adverse criticism if the charity
campaign had accompanied or followed a move-
ment to render the French additional assistance,
but the French made no appeal and no one started
a French drive. Too much cannot be said for the
good taste 'and gratitude fo past gifts tht our
former allies show by r fraing frompresenting
their needs to us from time to time, but this re-
straint is the reason why some of the money did
not go to rebuild France.
Unfortunately, the drive was inadvertantly
called a campaign "for starving Europeln stu-
dents"in certain news releases, and has come in
for some criticism thereby, though all reports in-
dicate that the solicitors always asked contriubu-
tions definitely for Viennese or Austrian destina-
tion, and that those in charge of the drive certainly
never intended that the mistake in appellation
should be made.
If the Austrian cause is a worthy one, we should
not upbraid each other for supporting it instead of
giving to France, but should keep French needs in
mind without being reminded of them by direct
appeal. America seems ready now to turn the full-
ness of its generosity to any good purpose; the
Austrians have seen this fact and with great enter-
prise taken advantage of it. The fault, if one ex-
ists, lies with Americans who have failed to make
use of their own mine of available funds for the
more appealing cause of reconstruction in the lands
of our former allies.

1.
er
H

avaa d ..

Persons wishing to secure inforinationconcern'ing news for any
ue. of The Daily should see the niht editor, who has full charg
all news to be printed that night.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1920.

e
t

Night Editor-H. W. HITCHCOCK.

The editorial staff and 'ry:uts will meet at 4:1
lock this afternoon. The p it p'er staff will mee
3:45 o'clock.

KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
ee position of surgeon general of the navy un-
cently was held by William C. Braisted of the
of '83f white Gen. John Biddle, who left Mich-
in 1877 in arder to enter West Point, had
e of the American forces in England during
Vorld waj.

ATHLETICS WITH THE EAST
Demand for the return of Michigan to competi-
n with the East in the track intercollegiate, in
seball, and in football las taken a tremendous
urt with the dosing of the very satisfactory
20 football season. Eastern alumni have a large
dy of sympathizers among their, confreres
roughout the country and, among the student
dy, in their efforts to revive again the annual
:ersectional struggles with their intense rivalry
d with the glory which they believe would at-
id Michigan's re-entrance.
It would be unfair to omit the fact that a large
dy of men well acquainted with Michigan's ath-
ic situation and particularly the football phase
it are opposed to Eastern competition on va-
us grounds, the chief of which are:
i. That Michigan should not attempt large in-
sectional contests until she has again established.
doubted leadership am..ng the schools of the
nference, inasmuch as a great East-and-West
itest is supposed to give some indications of the
ative strength of the best teams trained under
two systems.
. That playing an Eastern team brings Michi-
no national prestige inasmuch as the larger
stern universities have shown themselves to take
purely sectional view of athletics, refusing to
.sider that contests outside their own athletic
que" are anything but practice encounters, no
tter what the result. Exponents of this view
bt that Michigan could secure a home-and-
ne football arrangement.
. That the addition of another big football
ne to the schedule will merely serve to detract
n the drawing-power of the other games, and
t an Eastern contest i ill never create the in-
st which would be aroused by placing another
ference team on the schedule.
)bviously, the first objection can have no appli-
on to track and baseball, in both of which Mich-
i has for years been an acknowledged leader.
urn to the Eastern itercollegiates, which Mich.
s student body favors as heartily as it opposed
withdrawal last spring, is a step which should
:arried out as soon as the opportunity is pre-
ed. .Insofar as the ci iterion of "undoubted
ership" applies to foothall. it must be admitted
Michigan did not reach that summit this fall;
we did not fall far short, and Chicago, whose
i we defeated 14 to o. has scheduled a home-
home arrangement with Princeton. After all,
'e intend securing an Eastern game at all we
: to make it a permanent feature; and what is

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e: ery two
hours to 9:48 p. i.
t 9cls to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a..
and every two hours to 9:00 V. in.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and

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12:10 p.m.

A!

S M

12
19
26

6
13
20
27

DECEMBER
T W T
1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
28 29 30

F
3
10
17
24
31

S
4
11
25

MIMEOGRAPHING
CIRCULAR LETTERS
POST CARDS
ETC.
24 - HOUR SERVICE
Leave Orders at
Either of
Whar's Bookstores
or Edwards Bros.

Ia

Open Evenings Until Christmas

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

.Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work..Factory Hat Store,c817
Packard St. Phone 1792.

h'64

r

_1

r

elect. mas Gifts Early
A LARGE ASSORTMENT at
DA RLING & 9IA LL EAUX

i

GET INTO THE PICTURE
TODAY AT NOON
:In front of
IILL AUDITORIUM

a

DON'T MISS IT.

DR. TOM LOVELL,
Lt. Col. of Archery.'

224-226 S. State St

7

Nickels Arcade

11

- ]P AI DING-
Athletic
Equipment
For Every
Indoor
-- And
Outdoor
Sport
Catalogue on request
A. G SPALDING & BROS.
211 S. State St., Chicago, Ill.
SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE INTHE CITY
EVERYTHING :
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

:. _
1

_

--

' i f

_ " "
~
r' ;?,i;.
b, ,
.
° ° °d

GRAHAM

,i (6 Ci

What Is Air ?

f

TWO STORES

4

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Th.e Telescope
STANDING
No. of Contribs Points
Men......... ..175 175
Women ......... 5O 150
Ye Editor's Prayer Before an Ec. I Bluebook
Now I lay me down to sleep
In my little bunk.
I hope I die before I wake
And thus avoid a flunk.

i

The Co-.=d's Lament
We cannot change our nature,
That is beyond our reach.
The girl who is born a lemon
Can never be a peach.

4' .

EFORE 1894 every chemist thought he knew what air is. "A
mechanical mixture of moisture, nitrogen and oxygen, with
traces of hydrogen and carbon dioxide," he would explain.
There was so much oxygen and nitrogen in a given sample that he
simply determined the amount of oxygen present and assumed the
rest to be nitrogen.
One great English chemist, Lord Rayleigh, found that the nitro~-
gen obtained from the air was never so pure as that obtained from
some compound like ammonia. What was the "impurity"? In
co-operation with another prominent chemist, Sir William Ramsay,.
it was discovered in an entirely new gas-"argon." Later came the
discovery of other rare gases in the atmosphere. The air we breathe
contains about a dozen gases and gaseous compounds.
This study of the air is an example of research in pure science,
Rayleigh and Ramsay had no practical end in view--merely the dis-
covery of new facts.
A few years ago the Research Laboratories of the General Electriq
Company began to study the destruction' of filaments in exhausted
lamps in order to ascertain how this happened.: It was a purely
scientific undertaking. It was found that the filament evaporated
-boiled away, like so much water.
Pressure will check boiling or evaporation. If the pressure within
a boiler is very high, it will take more heat than ordinarily to boil the
water. Would a gas under pressure prevent filaments from boilin
away? If so, what gas? It must be a gas that will not combine
chemically with the filament. The filament would burn in oxygen;
hydrogen would conduct the heat away too rapidly. Nitrogen is '
useful gas in this case. It does form a few compounds, however:
Better still is argon. It forms no compounds at all.
Thus the modern, efficient, gas-filled lamp appeared, and so argon,
which seemed the most useless gas in the world, found a practical
application.
Discover new facts, and their practical application will take care
-of itself.
And.the discovery of new facts i the primary purpose of the
Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company.
Sometimes years must elapse before the practical application of a
discovery becomes apparent, as in the case of argon; sometimes a
practical application follows from the mere answering of a "theoret-
ical" question, as in the case of a gas-filled lamp. But no substantial
progress can be made unless research is conducted for the purpose of
discovering new facts.

I

01
)ilg
ell

no of the fair ones bolsters up her claim of be-
ing to the "wittier sex" when she rings the
for three points with this one:
Ode to Departed Spirits
'Twilight and eveing thirst -
And but cold tea for me -!
There's only moaning at the bar
Where whiskey used to be.

One case and but two jugs,
And then my cellar's dry.
There'll be much sadness of farewell
When I drink wood alcohol and die.
! For though from out of time and place
The Law hath borne it far,
I dream of a bottle face to face
When I stand at the bar!t

General Office Co

Y Schenectady, N.Y.

Famous Closing Lines
"Making light of me," sighed the martyr as they
lighted the fagots around him.

NOAH COUNT.

si-um-

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