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December 07, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IE WEATHER
)UDY AND COLDER
TODAY

r Efr

ttl

XXXI. No. 64.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1920.

HAIRING CONFERS
WITH OFFI:CIs
AT WHINGTON
PUTS INTO PRACTICE THEORY
OF CONSULTATION WITH
LEADERS
SITS IN AS MEMBER AT
FIRST SENATE MEETING
Will Resign a Senator in January
so Incoming Governor May
+ Name Successor
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 6.- To put into
practice his doctrine of consultation
and good understanding among public
officials, President-elect Harding
spent today at the capitol taking
stock of the legislative problems and
in turn seeking the co-operation of
congresional leaders in the tasks he
will confront as chief executive.
gat In Senate
Adding a unique page to the na-
tion's history, he attended as a sena-
tor the opening of the Senate and the
short address bespoke for the, com-
ing four years his spirit of teamwork
between executive and legislative
branches, that he expects to insure
the highest efficiency in national af-
'fairs at home and abroad.
Later, after conferences with lead-
ers from both Senate and House, he
announced that he probably would
call a special session of Congress
soon after his inauguration to attempt
it revision of the nation's tax sched-
ules. He asked that in the tree months
remaining, the present Congress be
used to clear away routine work and
lay the groundwork for constructive
legislation after March 4.
Foreign relations and the League of
Nations were discussed by Mr. Hard-
ing along with domestic problems
and possible cabinet selections in to-
day's conferences. Ranking national
leaders of the party outside of Con-
gress also were present at the consult-
ation which will be continued most
of tomorrow.
To Resign in January
With his departure for Marion late
tomorrow afternoon the President-
elect will bid good bye to actual par-
ticipation In the proceedings of the
Senate 'although he will retain his
title and office until early in the new
year. He revealed today that he had
decided definitely to resign his Senate
seat in January when a change of
state administration in Ohio will per-
mit the appointment of a Republican
to succeed him.
Poor Kiddies To
Get Party Gifts
Santa Claus will not find the chim-
neys df poor children in Ann Arbor
too small this year if the sororities,
fraternities, and house clubs on the
campus can prevent it. At least, even
if the old saint does overlook them
in his hurry and rush, they will not
be forgotten by the men and women
of these organizations, for according
to present plans. each society will
provide a regular Christmas for one
kiddie. The plans call for a party,
gifts, and a complete outfit of cloth-
ing for each child just before vaca-
tion.
Representatives of all such organi-
zations are to meet at 5 o'clock this

afternoon in the auditorium of Lane
hall to receive a list of these children.
Each society will be given the names
of one or more kiddies for whom it
will care.
Last year 41 fraternities and 19
sororities took care of children in
this way. The work was under the
direction of the city Association of.
Federated charities, the Y. M. C. A.,
and the Y. W. C. A.

Regents Van Political Speeches In
Hill Auditorium To Prevent U. of P1.
2eing Used As Political Football

Declaring that all state universities
in the United States have learned
through bitter experience the neces-
sity of keeping out of politics, Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton, in discussing
the action of the Regents regarding
the Student council petition for the
use of iHIl auditorium to speakers
brought here by student organiza-
tions, said Saturday morning that
their stand was taken in order to
prevent the University from being
used as a political football and be-
coming mixed up in political contro-
versies and partisan disputes.
"We believe in the truth, in free-
dom of 'speech, and in the freedom of
the press," stated President Burton.
"We think our students ought to have
the opportunity to face the main is-
DECLINE NOTED IN
MANY FOOD PRICES,
Pre-War Level Already Reached with
Coffffee; Other Costs Expected
to Fall
BOARDIN HOUSES MAY RE-
DUCE RATES AFTER VACATION
That prices of staple food articles
and meats have hd a great decline
in Ann Arbor was brought to light
yesterday in The Daily's inquiry of
city whosaer4 and retailers. In
some cases prices have reached pre-
war levels, notably in the case of cof-
fee, which is today selling for 1913-
1914 prices
In the face of these facts local
boarding house operators show ,little
inclination to lower prices of meals
immediately. One boarding house
has hinted that there may be a re-
duction after Christmas, while an-
other hopes to lower prices by the
end of the year. The general atti-
tude seems to be passive towards any-
thing looking to a reduction in food
prices to students.
Big Decreases Shown
Yesterday's investigation showed
astounding decreases in the prices of
food prodets since mid-summer.
"There has been a big decline in most
staples 'outside of the best canned
goods," was the comment of J. S.
Scovel, manager of Dean & Co., Ltd.
"Meat prices, especially pork, are
much lower than they have been,"
said George P. Geisendorfer, of Wein-
mann-Geisendorfer, dealers in meats.
Sugar, flour, coffee, rice and some
cereals have had great price declines.
according to figures given by Dean &
Co., wholesalers. Sugar, which they
sold for 30 cents per pound in June,
is selling at 10 -cents today. Best
roast coffee for which they got 50
cents a pound in July, they are selling
for 30 cents now. Cheaper grades
bring 17 cents a pound, as against 35
cents last July.
Flour Prices Toboggan
Flour has been on the toboggan
since May. when the high price was
$17 per barrel. Now it is wholesaled
at $9.65 per barrel.
Retail pork prices have taken a big
tumble. In October pork chops were
retailed at 50 cents a pound, and now
the price is 35 cents. Cheap grades
of beef have declined from 2 to 4
cents a pound, wholesale, while pric-
es of mutton have gone from 30
cents to 25 cents.
"Butter is moving downward, a
drop of 8 cents per pound being ef-
fected in the past several weeks," was
the statement of George Currie of the
Ann Arbor Dairy Co.
Labor Cost Raises Board

Giving various reasons for not low-
ering prices, local boarding houses do
not seem to be hopeful of an early
(Continued on Page Eight)

sues of the day. Therefore, the Re-
gents passed the resolution of the
Student council with the qualification
that Hill auditorium shall not be used
for political gatherings as such.
Generous Attitude Sought
"We want to take a generous and
forward looking attitude on questions
of this kind," he remarked. When
asked how strictly he thought the
line should be drawn between political
and non-political speeches, he said
that, for example, he would not keep
such a man as former President Wil-
liam Howard Taft from speaking on
the League of Nations in the audi-
torium.
Under the Regents' ruling, all dif-
ficulties and questions as to the de-
sirability of permitting various speak-
ers the use of the auditorium will be
decided by President Burton, the
president of the Student council, and
the Regents' committee on student
welfare, consisting of Regent James
O. Murfin, of Detroit, chairman, Re-
gent Benjamin S. Hanchett, of Grand
Rapids, and Regent Junius E. Beal, of
Ann Arbor.
Following the action taken by the
Regents, President Burton, in a letter
to Fred J. Petty, '21, and Calvin G
Wetzel, '21E, student councilmen, ex-
plained their attitude as follows:
President Explains Action
"At the meeting of the Board of Re-
gents held yesterday the petition
which you presented in regard to the
use of Hill auditorium was given very
careful consideration.
"The Regents recognize fully the
elements of truth represented by your
petition. I am sure you also agree
that the best interests of the Univer-
sity compel us not to get mixed up in
political controversies. This is a
policy which all the state universities
in the country, through bitter experi-
ence, have learned must be main-
tained.
"Consequently, we actually did ap-
prove your petition with the sole
qualification that the 'building must
not be used for political gatherings
and political speeches.
Council Action Commended
"I fell perfectly confident that yo
will recognize in this action a genu-
ine effort on the part of the Board
officially to recognize the elements o
truth for which you have stood. I may
add that from my point of view, you
have stood for them very wisely."
WORK FOR THE 101A
AMERICA, SAYS GRIFFIN,
SHOULD ESTABLISH FOUNDA-
TION FOR BETTER ORDER
IN WlRLD
"The most buoyant feeling a man
can have is gained by giving his re-
sources untiringly to .the furtherance
of the ideal America," said Dr. Fred-
erick Griffin, of Philadelphia, in his,
lecture on "Adventures in Patriot-
ism" last night in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium. "But," he contin-
ued, "the most heavy, weary burden
in. the world for man, though seem-
ing. carefree and pleasant at the
time, is to live a selfish life."
Dr. Griffin brought out the fact that
everyone should work to establish a
foundation for better order in the
world so that those who come later
will not suffer. He also expressed the
idea of America's great need for an
institution to foster religious con-
sciousness and direct the ways of use-
fulness.
"We are under responsibility in

just one way," concluded Dr. Griffin,
"we must keep the Great Ideal ever
before us and work for its accom-
plishment."

TO SELL MINSTREL
TICKETS THIS WEEK
Tickets for "Minstrelsy," to be pro-
duced by the Varsity Glee and Man-
dolin club Dec. 15, 16, 17, at the Whit-
ney theater under the direction of the
Michigan Union, may be purchased
Thursday, Friday and Saturday of
this week at the Union.
Men will receive tickets in the or-
der of their arrival in the line-up at
the desk. Only six seats will be
sold to one person. Ticket sales will
be conducted at the following time:
Thursday, 2-5, 7-9; Friday, 9-12, 2-5;
and Saturday, 9-12 o'clock.
"Minstrelsy" is a revival of the
old time Union minstrel show and is
presented this year under the direc-
tion of C. Mortimer Shuter.
DUNNE ELECTED
F OOTBALLLEADER
Goetz Declared by Yost to Be One of
Most Successful Tackles in
Country
"DUKE" CALLED WORKER;
PROMISES BEST FOR '21 YEAR
Election of R. Jerome ("Duke")
Dunne, '22, as captain of the 1921
football team, speeches by Prof.
Ralph Bartelme, ex-Captain Goetz,
Captain-elect Dunne, and Coach Yost
at the Varsity dinner last night
brought the 1921 Michigan football
season to a close
"It was a successful season," said
Coach Yost, "considering that in the
opinion of many ekperts Michigan did
not have any men good enough for
the first or second Conference teams.
In spite of this the team played last
year's winners to a 7 to 6 game and
this year's champions won only byad
blocked kick."
Players, Coaches, Praised
The players and assistant coaches
were praised by thecoach for their
hard work and consistent efforts for
Michigan. He pointed out that the
ulayers must give of their best both
on and off the field. "Yox men must
guard well your conduct and action
that you may deserve the trust and
honor gained through your work on
the field," Yost said.
Explaining the difficulties of fixing
the 1921 schedule, Coach Yost said
that Michigan had the hardest Confer-
ence schedule with the possible excep-
tion of Chicago, who is meeting
Princeton. "I feel that this schedule
includes enough territory and that
such a one will keep us busy and re-
quire the best efforts of all. There
was no ill feeling between Chicago
and Michigan over the failure to have
a game between these two. Chicago
had to lighten her schedule, and she
felt that Michigan was the one to be
dropped," he said.
Ex-captain Goetz was praised by
the coach as a great leader and one
of the most sterling tackles in the
country. "A hard Worker was elect-
ed captain, and he will give his best
to Michigan as have all the Dunnes,"
Coach Yost declared.
Aigler Toastmaster
As toastmaster Professor Aigler
spoke of the faculty athletic meeting
at Chicago last Saturday, telling of the
actions taken there. The rule re-
quiring numbering of players, the
changing of the eligibility rule to be
six semesters or nine quarters which
will permit mid-year entrants to play
a full three years, and the refusal of

the Conference to permit referees in
professional football games to offici-
(Continued on Page Eight)
SENIOR DUES PAYABLE
Senior class dues should be
paid from 2 to 4 o'clock today
in University hall.

PLEDGES TOTAL $4,100 FOR UNION
POOL; $1,200 RECEIVED AT MEETING
OF CAMPAIGN WORKERS LAST NIGH

DELIVERY COMPLAINTS
Delivery of Dailies in the sec-
tion east of State street and
north of North University has
been irregular for the last two
weeks. This has been caused
by frequent unavoidable chang-
es in carriers on this route. A
new carrier starts delivering
this route with this morning's
issue so hereafter subscribers
in this district should receive
their papers regularly.
All Dailies on all routes
should now be received by 7:30
o'clock and should be folded so
they will not be blown away.
SPOTUIGHT TICKET
SALE SETS RECORD

Expect
of

Unusually Large Attendance
Students and Faculty at
Vaudeville

PROGRAM RUNS GAMUT FROM
SYNCOPATION TO HYPNOTIS1
If an unprecedented ticket sale can
be taken as a criterion of the attend-
ance at the Spotlight vaudeville to-
night at Hill auditorium, there will
be present a record breaking number
of faculty and students when the first
act is commenced at. 8 o'clock.
Seven snappy acts, consisting of
magic, music, hypnotism and dancing
are promised. One hour and 40 min-
utes will be the time limit for the
program which is to be kept in con-
stant motion.
Union Orchestra to Make Boy
Opening with an overture, the Un-
ion orchestra makes its debut, fol-
lowed by Schemm and Walter, who
will entertain in a dancing act en-
titled "Tidbits of Chatter and Song.'
"The Mystery Man" is Robert Dee-
bach, '23D, who will hold the center
of the stage in the longest act of the
entire show. Hypnotizing perhaps 15
men, he intends to make them per-
form many freakish antics. "Every
act is genuine, and will be as repre-
sented," according to Peirce McLouth,
'21E, chairman.
"Waltz Llewellyn" is among the
selections which will be played by
Myron S. Chon, '23, saxaphone artist,
following "The Hypnotist." James C.
Brown's act, "Chalk Talk," is to be
one of the clever ones, according to
those who saw it rehearsed.
Orchestra Declared Different
Something novel and different by a
feature orchestra is declared to be
the act of George Rogers, '21E, and
his six-piece organization, while the
final curtain will be dropped after the
grand finale by the Union orchestra.
DATE OF VACATION
TO REMAIN DEC.21
A misunderstanding has arisen as
to the exact date on which Univer-
sity classes will close for the Christ-
mas vacation. The date remains the
same as first° announced, Tuesday,
Dec. 21, according to a statement is-
sued from President Marion L. Bur-
ton's office.
The question of dismissing classes
at an earlier date was brought up at
a committee meeting of the-deans and
rejected because they said it was too
late for any change to be effected in
the original schedule.

£ -

50c

TICKTS AT
Wahtrs
Grahamns
Slaters

A N;NUA L
Spotlight Vaudeville
TONIGHT

P. "

HILL AVDITOK-IUM

P. M.

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