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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 04, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURI

i "> . n . ..

Sti tc au Dat

I

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univ
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use f
bblication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwi
ited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as seco
i matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press-building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soowords, if signed, the s
re not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at t
-etion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily 0offi
gned communications will receive no bonsideration. No ml
'pt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
rhe Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentimentsv
sed in the communications.
'What'sGoing On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clo
e evening preceding insertion.

Ver
ise
end
ig-
of
he
ice,
an.
ex-
)ck

. .
r
e
d
f
e
c
f
E

DIRECTORY'S OUT, ADVISERS
Difficulty in getting in touch with underclass
protegees has 'been frequently cited by upperclass
advisers as an excuse for failing to do their part
in helping first year men get started at Michigan.
While the plea has been greatly overworked, it i
doubtless true that the trouble and even impossi-
bility of getting track of freshmen on advisory
lists has been an important handicap to one hun-
dred per cent efficiency.
With the publication of the Student Directory,
however, all problems of locating the new men prac-
tically disappear and there is no good reason why
the expectations of the advisory plan should not be
fully realized.
The necessity of employing some means to keep
the students in a big and growing university like
Michigan from drifting apart because of the sheer
size of the institution is unquestioned, and the ad-
visory system is a logical and practical solution of
the problem. If a complete success this year, it
will become an established organization that will
perform a constantly increasing service to Michi-
gan every year.
Peruse the directory,, upperclass advisers. Find
the addresses of the freshmen you have not vis-
ited, and call on your men this week. Now is the
time to take care of -the loose ends!

G RAH AM

TWO STORES

Open Evenings Until Christmas

AM
BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

..__.

- - ~ *1

I, _ -

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
RAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY .JR,
s Editor .............................Chesser M. Campbell
it Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
LJI. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
R enaud Sherwood
ay Editor ................. ......J.. A. Bernstein
tant News...........................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
s. ...... ...................... .Robert Angel
en's Editor.................. .........Mary D. Lane
raph ..................................West Gallogly
cope ....................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
hine Waldo Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
G. Weber Thomas E. Pewey M. A. Klaver
:na Barlow Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
beth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer . Walter .Donn~ljy
Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beata Hasley
ge Reindel Hughston McBain Kathrine Montgomery
hy Monfort Frank H. McPike Gerald P. Overton
yB. Grundy J A. Bacon Edward Lambrecht
es Oberholtzer k.W. Ottaway William H. Riley Jr.
rt . Adams Paul Watzel Sara Wailer
ian C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.

DETR OIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. i.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:43 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5: 55am., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. mn.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
JOHN CRANE
Coal, Coke and Wood
Office - 208 E. Waah ngton St.
Office Phone 623-F-1 Yard 625-F-2
I.sal

DECEMBER
S X~ T WV T F S
1 2 3 4
6 6 7 8 . 9 10 11
12 13 1 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.

The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

i

s

EXCESS BAGGAGE

_.__.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
INESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
ertising. ...................D................. P. Joyce
5ifieds........ .......... ............Robt. 0. Kerr
ication ....................................F. M. Heath
tints ._....... +..........................E. R. Priehs
lation .....................................V. V. Hillery
Assistants
N. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
fund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
eer W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

--._ ,,

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
it news to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4 4, 1920.
Night Editor-B. P. CAMPBELL.

7y
'c

KNuW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Michigan's recognizedwcollege anthem ;"The
low and Blue," was written in T879 by Prof.
rles Mills Gayley, at that time an instructor of
n at the University. Professor Gayley wrote
erous educational books, a few of the most
ely known of which are "Classic Myths in Eng-
Literature", "The Star of Bethlehem", and
Guide to the Literature of Aesthetics", writ-
in collaboration with Prof. F. N. Scott.

r

There are few undertakings outside Utopia
which have absolutely no drawbacks; and, being
distinctly of the world of reality, getting a college
education is not always a "heads I win, 'tails you
lose" proposition. This truth, often passed over
slightly by the high school graduate who keeps o
going to school as a matter of course, was brought
out sharply in "What a Man Loses in Going to
College," an article in the Saturday Evening Post.
In this article the author lists as the costs of a
university education, the money cost, the loss o
four years' association with men in the business
world, and the mannerisms acquired in college.
Special stress is laid on the last item, and under it
students are charged with indifference toward th
world and its problems, vanity in manners and
dress, egotism of the "I'll tell 'em" genus, and in-
ability to distinguish between discussion and a.
gument. The theory underlying these allegations
is that the university man does not live in the re,
world but in a fictitious world he has set up.
While this criticism may go a little too far and
be a little too inclusive, it has a great deal of value
in pointing out to us what to guard against. Th.
money and time costs are unavoidable. The 'ac.
quisition of harmful mannerisms and an erroneous
point of view may be the biggest price that we pr:
because of their tendency to detract from the real
values of a college training. We should never lose
sight of the fact that our main reason for attending
an institution of higher learning is to prepare to
take our part in. the world itself, and should be-sure
at all times that we are not picking up any excess
baggage that will handid p us.

11

NOW is the time to order

your

999

PERSONAL
CHRISTMAS
GREETING
CARDS
while our assortment
complete
ENGRAVING &
EMBOSSING

iS

999

a-

TAXI

999

a specialty. In ordering
from us you get the serv-
ices of some of the most

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service
enough said -m
999

OFF
Adr ~vercoat -
SALE 1-3 OFF
STAR TiNG TODAY SATURDAY-
We will give you One-Third Off on any Fitform
_ r-
Suit or Overcoat in our store - nothing reserved
-a
THIS IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY
to get the finest young men's merchandise at the
above prices. Every Garment Guaranteed to give
you satisfaction. We Sell the Best.
EXTRA SPECIALS
Gordon Leather Reversible Coats at cost $30.00 =
$5.00 Cloth Hats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 2.98
Toques --Extra Heavy All-Wool ......$ 1.00
Wilson Brothers' Heavy Wool Hose....$ 1.00 =
TOM CORBET
a
116 EAST LIBERTY STREET -
Between Main and 4th Ave. The Young Men's Shop
: ![111111 #I II t111 1t11 tllt Ul l t11111 11111 1 1#l ll

II

exclusive Engraving
Stationery houses in
Middle West.

and
the.

UNJU STIFIED "LEADERSHIP"
?ursuing a policy directly opposed to that of al-
st all American college newspapers; The Daily,
ncetonian has regularly taken a definite editor-
stand on the great political issues of the na-
i. It supported Cox throughout the campaign,
pite the fact that the majority of Princeton stu-
ts were against him. The editors have re-
tly joined a campus Socialistic Discussion so-
y, and this seems to have provoked a storm of
dent disapproval and a desire to oust the man-

I

There is only one smoker a year for team and
student body. It is to be held today at Detroit.
Don't miss it if you can possibly make the state
metropolis.
The Telescope

Printing and imitation of
Engraving can be furnish-
ed if desired.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade

---------------------------------------

STANDING
No. of Contribs
Men .. ....... ..32
Women ......... 40

r - - -

nent.
he whole question raised by the Princetonian
ation is as to whether it is the function of a
ege newspaper to lead student opinion along,
s which only the editors' personal opinions dic-
, or to be a reflecting organ for the best and
t representative opinons of the campus at

Points
132
120

-. - W

When I was young and in my prime
I fussed the co-eds all the time.
But now I'm old and growing gray
I've made up my mind it doesn't pay..

ge.
in a great city, where almost every political be-x
, many religions, and even business enterprises
re their individual organs, fearless expression of
editor's personal views is of paramount im-
tance, and the pusillanimous fence-straddler gets
y his just meed of condemnation. The man who
s to find views which accord with his own in.
7 newspaper he may buy will not have to in-
re long before he will discover the journal he
nts. The situation makes for a great cosmopol-
exchange of strongly expressed opinon which
;ood for the nation and assures for each paper
ympathetic reading public.
3ut the college paper is by the facts of the case
an entirely different class. The entire college
Imunity must rely upon it for news; it has no
ipetitors, and nobody who disagrees with its edi-
al policy has any opportunity to start a rival
an, at least with any chance of success.
he editorial writer for the college paper may
e had great experience on outside newspapers,
may be thoroughly qualified to form logical
ions on public questions. But that he should
me the guise of crusading leadership when the
result is merely the cramming of his personal
s down the intellectual throats of a college
munity as well qualified for judgment as him_
seems a brand of egotism which American col-
dailies have done well to avoid. Their fune-
is, first, the giving of news; and then, if pos-
the provision of an opportunity for the ex-
ion of campus opinon through communica-
, and reflection of the best of it through the
rial columns.

{
_

1
7

(Bulletin)
We have just received word from Angelina, our
staunch contributor, that she has recovered from
her cold and is again ready to throw herself into
the seething fray of the Humor Contest.

#..

There was once a bashful prof.,
Loved a girl but feared to ad.,
But a co-ed he knew
Gave him lessons a few,
Aud now you should see him car. -
There was a girl in our house,
And she was wondrous wise.
She grew herself some wee spit curls
Just up above her eyes.
She got her dresses tight and short
And learned the baby stare,
And acted young end innocent,
You tell 'em - she was rare.
Back in her little native town
She never was a hit -
But now for dates the campus men
Have simply fought and fit.

I
I
I
I'

2AM%

ON OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF HIGH GRADE

Discount
Shoe Sale

FOOTWEAR for MEN and WOMEN

20%

I
I
I

20 PER CENT OFF

10 PER CENT OFF

I

ON BUCKLES

Of HOSIERY

1

In order that my many Ann Arbor customers may take advantage
of this sale, I shall be at the branch evenings from 7:00 to 8:30.
In the afternoon from 3:00 to 5:00 the store will be open with
Mr. Carl R. Pratt in charge.

I

GEO. T. ALEXANDER

Atfrri Ji.

Wn also wish to assure the author of this that it
does count three points for her sex.

ANN ARBOR

3 tur.

I,

I
t

CIICAGO

DETROIT

MADISON

Famous Closing lines
"Things are coming down," hse remarked as his
hose supporter skidded.
NOAH COU)IT.

L -

-,--y

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