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December 04, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-04

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
TODAY

r 3k a

juat-t9

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT 'WIRE
SE RICE

VOL XXXI. No. 52. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

BUSY DAY MARKS
CLOSE OF PRESS
CLUB CONFRENCE
LLOYD C. DOUGLAS SPEAKS BE.
FORE BANQUET WHICH CON-
CLUDES SESSION
CARR'S PAPER CAUSE
OF MUCH DISCUSSION
Ottoway Elected President for the
Year; Next Meeting to Be
Held Here
"Americans are exaggerationists.
We are liars - we like to tell how
much bigger our mountans are than
they really are, how much deeper our
ravines," said Rev. Lloyd Douglas at
the banquet at the Union last night
which concluded the three day conven-
tion of the University Press club, the
first gathering since its organization
a year ago.
"Splendid Program," Brumm
"I think we have had a splendid
program. I regret only that more
newspaper men could not have prof-
ited by it," was the comment on the
convention of Prof. John L. Brumm,
retiring president of the club.
Offcers for the ensuing year were
elected at the afternoon session as
follows: President, James Ottoway,
Port Huron Times-Herald; vice-pres-
ident, Stewart H. Perry, Adrian Tel-
egram; secretary, Prof. John L.
Brumm, of the rhetoric department,
University of Michigan; treasure,
Harley Johnson, Ann Arbor Times-
News. The constitution of the club
was formally adopted at this ses-
sion.
Next year's meetings will again be
held in Ann Arbor, at a date to be
decided upon by the officers. It is
said that the convention will proba-
bly be held late in a week immedi-
ately preceding one of the big foot-
ball games next fall.
Full Program
_ Yesterday's program was the full-
est of the .entire meeting, the prini-
pal speakers being Lowell J. Carr,
grad., formerly state editor for the
Detroit Free Press, and Prof. E. R.
Sunderland at the forenoon session;1
Dean A. H. Lloyd, Dean M. E. Cooley,
A. W. Stace of the Grand Rapids
Press, and Librarian W. W. Bishop
at the afternoon session; and Rev.
Lloyd Douglas, Dean A. H. Lloyd and
A. E. McCrae of the Muskegon Chron-
icle at the banquet last evening, at
which Prof. F. N. Scott was toast-
master.
At the morning session Lowell J.
Carr read a paper on "Who Shall Con--'
trol the Press?" His claim, that at
present the news sections of papers£
are but adjuncts to the business side;f
that the business community, not the
community as a whole, controls the
press, and that legislation by the
states is a possible partial solution,
at least, of the newspaper problem of
today, called forth vigozous protest.
Denies Carr's Indictments
Lee A. White, '10, of the Detroit
News, denied many of Carr's indict-
ments of the newspaper, cing in-
stances to prove his points. While
agreeing that the press as yet has not
reached the millenium, when the e
shall be evolved the perfect newspa-
per, he insisted that the country's pa-
pers have been advancing, and doing

so steadily.
Following the discussion caused by
Carr's paper, Prof. E. R. Sunderland
of the Law school brought to the at-
tention of the editors present the need
of a press campaign for the reform of
court procedure. He stressed the
great work the press accomplished
during the war, and suggested that
one of the ways in which it could con-
tinue its service to the country would
be by bringing to light the many3
shameful delays and useless prac-
tices of the American court room. £
)eon Lloyd Speakst
Dean A. H. Lloyd of the Graduate
school, first speaker at the afternoonl
session addressed the convention on
"Newspaper Conscience." He took the
position that to a certain extent a
newspaper conscience is non-existent,!
and asked, "Is a newspaper wholly
trusty?" Pointing'out that generally1
newspapers were conservative, heI
(Continued on Page Eight)

FRENCH STUDENTS
FTO WRITE ABROAD
Opportunities will be given to those
students who are studying French in
the more advanced courses offered by
the Literary college to correspond
with French men and women. Blanks
are being passed out by professors
and instructors which, after they are
filled out by students,'will be sent
to a society in New York, organized
to promote correspondence between
the young people of France and Amer-
ica.
According to Prof. Hugo P. Thieme,
the society will make every effort to
furnish a correspondent of the same
age as the applicant.
AillYFISCAL AID
DEPENDS ON KING,
Supreme Council Withdraws Support
If Constantine Is Returned to
Greek Throne
ALLIES STRONGLY WARN STATE
TO CONFORM TO THEIR WISHES
(By Associated Press)
London, Dec. 3. - The Allied su-
preme council today publicly an-
nounced it would withdraw financial
support from Greece should former
King Constantine be returned to the
throne in the plebescite of Sunday
and would consider territorial repris-
als should he be enthroned.
The council also decided that the
allied premiers should meet a fort-
night hence to discuss conditions as
they exist after the Greeks register
their choice in the plebescite.
Allies Await Decision
The course to be pursued by the
Allies in the Near East will have to
await the Greek decision on the dy-
nasty question, it was decided. The
conferees also resolved to make a
formal protest against issuance by the
Greek government of 200,000,000
drachmas in currency.
Briefly summarized, the position of
the Allies is that they want to warn
the Greeks vigorously that their gov-
ernment must conform to a great ex-
tent to the wishes of the Allies, and'
that, if admonitions in yesterday's and
today's statements, relative to the
withdrawal of financial support are
ineffective,,the Allies are prepared to
take even sterner measures, which1
were discussed today.
Treaty Unratified
As the Sevres treaty has not been
ratified, it is within the power of the
Allies to modify it, and they are keep-
ing this fact to the fore, at least in{
regard to Smyrna. It is known that
some of those at the conference today1
expressed belief that Symrna would
be safey from the Allies' standpoint
in Turkish hands than in the hands
of the Greeks under Constantine.
NINE GAMESIMPROBABLE
Aigler Says Press Reports Only In-
formation He Has On Plan
"Press reports are the only inform-
ation that I have that Conference of-
ficials contemplate a nine game sched-
ule this year," stated Prof. Ralph1

Aigler, chairman of the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics, yesterday, when ques-
tioned regarding the probable outcome
of the Conference athletic meet which'
will be held in Chicago today.
"In 1918 or the year following, a
proposition was brought before the
committee to extend the football
schedule from seven to eight games,
only to be voted down. This would
indicate that possibilities of a nine
game schedule this year are rather
remote. However, it seems likely
that a suggestion of an eight game
schedule would be more favorable at
the present time.
"In all probability Michigan will
play four Conference games," contin-
ued Professor Aigler. "The only two
games outside of these, which can be
predicted are the Case and M. A. C.
games, which have become fixtures'
with us. This would make it impossi-
ble to play more than five Conference
games unless the schedule were ex-
tended."-

POOL DRIV E GETS
10 NEWCAPOiS
One Man to Handle Campaign in Each
Fraternity and House
Club
MEETING TO BE HELD FOR
ALL TEAM MEMBERS MONDAY
Ten additional team captains for
the Union swimming pool drive were
announced yesterday. These men
will pick their assistants before Mon-
day evening, at which time final in-
structions will be given to the work-
ers at an assembly at the Union.
One man in each of the fraterni-
ties and house clubs has been named
to handle the campaign in his house.
A 100 per cent response is expected
from this source.
Meeting Monday
Union officials yesterday stressed
the fact that the solicitors' pledges
which will be signed during the drive
on Dec. 8 and 9 will not obligate the
signer to obtain the full amount prom-
ised. They desire the students to be
conservative in their estimates of the
sums they can raise as they prefer to
have the subscriptions exceed rather
than to fall short of the total amount
pledged.
Full information on the conduct of ;
the campaign will be given out at theE
meeting Monday evening by . C.
Drulard, coach of the swimming
team, and officials of the drive.
All to Attend
This meeting will be attended by all1
captains and team members. It willt
provide them with the data necessary
for their work on Wednesday and
Thursday, Dec. 8 and 9, at which time
they will canvass the men of the Uni-
versity to get them to solicit for
swimming pool funds during the hol-
idays. Every man on the campus- is1
expected to assist in raising tb,
money, and these teams have the taskt
of getting the men to indicate their<
intention of making the solicitations.
The new captains announced are'
Robert Bernard, '23, Bowen Schu-t
macher, '22, E. C. Drulard, swimmingI
coach, Craig Ferguson, '22, Norman'
Kolb, '23, George Stone, '22, A. B.t
Evans, '22E, William Valentine, '23,
and George A. Schuster, '21.
TAU BETA PI INVITATIONS
HAVE BEEN MAILED OUT
Invitations to the Tau Beta Pi for-I
mal were mailed to the engineering
faculty Thursday afternoon and the
final details have been arranged in
preparation for the big social func-
tion of the Engineering honorary so-I
ciety, which will be held Friday even-
ing, Dec. 10, at the Packard acad-
emy.
The chaperons for the evening will
be Professor and Mrs. J. E. Emswil-
er, Professor and Mrs. G. L. Alt, and
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Davidson.f
Elaborate decorations and several
specialty features have been arrang-t
ed by the committee in charge. Music,
will be furnished by Nobe Weather-I
by's orchestra.,
NEW NOVELTY QUARTETTE
A FEATURE AT MAJESTICE
As a new attraction the Majestic
theater last night presented its pa-
trons with a surprise in the form of<
a series of musical numbers present-t
ed along with the regular program
by an aggregation of students known
as "The Majestic Quartette."1

This quartette is to be a permanent_
feature of the program at this theateri
from now on, appearing at certain]
times each week, which will be an-
nounced later. A program will, how-i
ever, be presented by the organiza-:
tion at both the matinee and evening
shows today.
:
Camp Davis Men Give Dance
Khaki trousers, Elide rules, andi
flannel shirts were worn at the Camp3
Davis dance, given last night at the1
Packard. A short sketch, "Survey-
ing as It Shouldn't Be Done," por-
trayed various happenings at the
camp.
State Officials Confer with Regents
Charles R. Foote, state budget com-i
missioner, and Major Green, assistant
attorney general of Michigan, were
here from Lansing yesterday in con-
ference with members of the Board
of Regents and University officials.

Enthusiam, Smoke Clouds, And
Speeches To Hold Sway Tonight

(By R. A.)
Clouds of congenial smoke will en-
velop loyal Michigan alumni and loy-
al Michigan football men alike this
evening at the Detroit Board of Com-
merce. The celebration is termed the
"Comeback Smoker," and promises to
be a riot of enthusiasm.
Not only will free smokes be pro-
vided for the members of the Var-
sity, reserve, and freshman football
squads, but they will be stuffed withl
refreshments, serenaded with music
by the Varsity band and the 37th U.:
S. Infantry band, and edified by talks
from Prof. Lewis M. Gram, Judge Ira
W. Jayne, Robert H. Clancy, field sec-
retary of the Athletic association, and
Assistant Coach Prentiss Douglass.

The hosts of the occasion are the
members of the University of Michi-
gan club of.Detroit. James K. Wat-
kins, president of the "M" club, is in
general charge of the smoker.
The athletes will not be given a
moment's rest from the time they
reach the Detroit city limits, where
a delegation of alumni will meet
them. A visit to the Adams theater,
Is the first event onsthe program.
Following this the Varsity squad will
be whisked to the University club for
dinner, the reserves and freshmen go-
ing to the Board of Commerce. The
smoker itself will begin at 8 o'clock.
Two special interurbans will leave
the Ann Arbor station at 1:10 o'clock
to convey the guests to Detroit.

1

SOVIT RECOGNITION
TO BE DEBA TE SUBJECT
ILLINOIS - WISCONSIN - MICHIGAN'
TO MEET IN TRIANGULAR
AFFAIR
"Resolved-That the Government
of the United States Should Have Of-
ficially Recognized the Soviet Gov-
ernment of Russia Before July 1,
1920," is the question that has been
selected for the Illinois-Wisconsin-
Michigan debate to be held after the
holidays. The other two questions
that were under consideration dealt
with the establishment of an inter-
national court of justice, irrespective
of the League of Nations, and with the
acceptance by the public of the open
shop principle.
The preliminary debates for the se-
lection of the Michigan teams will be
completed before the Christmas vaca-
tion starts and a squad of 24 debat-
ers will be chosen. Members of Al-
nha Nu, Adelphi, and Athena societies
will compete for positions on the
teams, and an open competition will
be held for students, other than those
nossessing degrees, who are not iden-
tified with these organizations. When
school resumes after the vacation, fin-
al selection will be made of the two
teams, three debaters being the requi-
site number per team.
LEA90E'CABART SHOWS
METROPOLITAN FINISH

HONOR SYSTEM FOR IT
COLLEGE MEETS FAVOR
CLASSES WILL TAKE MATTER UP
IN COMING MEETINGS BY
STRAW VOTE
Adoption of the honor system in the
literary college is strongly favored
by the presidents of the senior, ju-
nior, and sophomore classes. As yet
action has been taken toward the for-
warding of this honor system in only
the senior class, but both of the oth-
er* two classes, according to their
presidents, will probably take a straw
vote on the question at the next meet-
ings.
"I am anxious to see this system
adopted in the literary college," stat-
ed Fred J. Petty, '21, senior lit pres-
ident, when ,asked his opinion. "A
committee of seniors is now arrang-
ing a plan for the introduction of
the honor system; when it is complet-
ed, if adopted by the senior class in
January, it will be presented to the
faculty for their approval. If this
system is accepted the seniors will be
responsible for the. conduct of: stu-
dents taking examinations."
0. W. Rush, president of the junior
lit class, said: "I believe the step-:the
seniors are taking ought to be fol-
lowed up by the other classes and I
intend to bring. it up at the next meet-
ing."
President Vernor Hillery, sopho-
more lit president, stated: "in my
opinion there is a real need for the
honor system in the literary college.
The sophomore class will take a
straw vote on the question at our
meeting next Tuesday, if such is ap-
proved."
CLUB TO ADVOCATE
EASTERN CONTESTS
The renewal of Michigan's partici-
pation in Eastern athletic events is
being strongly advocated by members
of the New England club. The club
has started an extensive campaign to
this end by requesting Michigan alum-
ni in the East to personally express
their views on the subject by let-
ter before the meeting of the Board
in Control of Athletics Dec. 15.
According to the statement of mem-
bers of the club, Eastern alumni feel
that relations between themselves and
their Alma Mater are growing more
and more remote, because Michigan
teams are no longer seen on Eastern
fields. The club will concentrate its
efforts to have Michigan represented
in the intercollegiate track meet in
the Harvard stadium next spring.
JUDGE FISHER TO SPEAK
BEFORE MENORAH SOCIETY
The Hon. Judge Harry M. Fisher of
Chicago will speak on the subject,
"The Jew in Soviet Russia and East-
ern Europe" before the Menorah so-
ciety at 8:15 o'clock Sunday evening,

REGENTS ISCUSS
OLD QUESTION OF
POLMITI CCLTALS
PROVIDE FOR USE OF HILL AU.
DITORIUM BY PROMINENT
SPEAKERS
STILL BAN PARTISAN
POLITICAL SPEECHES
Make Arangements for Uniform for
R. 0. T. C.; Accept New Gift
for Library
With a qualifying provision that
speeches of a partisan political na-
ture shall not be permitted in Hill au-
ditorium or any other University
building, the Board of Regents in their
meeting yesterday sanctioned a peti-
tion from the Student council asking
that use of Hill auditorium be grant-
ed to student organizations for lec-
tures or addresses by prominent men
brought to Ann Arbor by the organ-
izations.
Supported by faculty and student
sentiment, the council placed the peti-
tion before the Regents last March
with the suggestion that a faculty
committee be appointed to pass on
the advisability of allowing speakers
the use of the building in each indiv-
idual case.
Petition Tabled
At that time the petition was tabled
because the Regents feared difficulty
would be encountered in deciding who
should be permitted the use of the
auditorium and who shotild be refus-
ed.
As passed by the Regents yester-
day, the petition provides that "use of
Hill auditorium may be granted to
student organizations for lectures or
addresses by prominent men on top-
ics of the day, under guarantee that
during such addresses there shall be
no violation of the recognized rules
of hospitality, nor advocacy of the
subversion of government, or of the
state, and that such meetings shall
be in spirit and expression worthy of
this University." The Regents further
declared that the University buildings
shall under no circumstances be used
for partisan political speeches or pur-
poses.
Provides for Committee
It is provided that petitions for the
use of Hill auditorium for such
speeches shall be made to a commit-
tee consisting of the President of the
University, members of the Regents'.
committee on student affairs, and the
president of the Student council. This
committee will pass upon the advis-
ability of permitting the speech in
each case.
Authorize Uniform
A distinctive uniform for students
who are members of the R. o. T. C.
was authorized upon suggestion of
Major Robert Arthur, professor of
military science and tactics. The uni-
form will consist of a straight front
sack coat of dark blue, trousers of the
same color without stripes or other
distinctive markings, and a blue cap
similar in cut to the overseas cap
worn by army men.
The only insignia of the uniform
is to be blue silk R. 0. T. C. on the
left sleeve of the coat. Students will
be required to wear the uniform only
while undergoing training.
Duffield Gives Books
The Regents accepted a gift of 6,000

volumes for the University Library
from the collections of George Duf-
field, Sr., Regent from 1839 to 1848
and George Duffield, Jr., Regent from
1877 to 1886. The gift from Judge C.
B. Grant, of Detroit, of an auto-
graphed poem by Dr. H. B. Tappan,
former President of the University,
was acknowledged.
The resignation of Dr. G. Irving
Naylor, recorder of the Homeopathic
Medical school, was reported and ac-
cepted. Miss M. Eunice Wead, as-
(Continued on Page Eight)
SPECIAL PLACES RESERVED
FOR DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Special space with a background of
blue cardboard is being reserved on
bulletin boards in University build-
ings for the Daily Official Bulletin.
The copies posted in this space are in-
tended to bring notices more readily
to the attention of students. Faculty
members receive individual -copies of
the Bulletin.

DANCES, FLUFFY DRESSES,
TURE HATS, AND JAZZ
FEATURE PROGRAM
(By S. MV.)
More than 300 girls sought

PIC-I

reliefI

from mid-semester worries at the
Women's league cabaret yesterday
afternoon at Barbour gymnasium. The
show, put on between dances accord-
ing to time honored cabaret custom,
was marked by vividness, and a gen-
uine New York finish.
First Hortense Hoad, '24, array-
ed in a frilly pink ballet costume,
skipped out upon the dance floor, and
executed a clever little dance to the
music of "Japanese Sandman." Then
after the guests, who were seated
around tables at the sides of the gym-
nasium, had danced, the "Delta Gam-
ma Kitchen orchestra" rendered a
program made up both of light opera
and jazz. The musicians were clad
in bungalow aprons and had some
kitchen soot upon their faces, toj
show that they had come straight
from regions of the stove ani frying
pan. This proof was hardly neces-
sary as their instruments were dish-
pans, egg-beaters, and other kitchen
implements.
The act from the "Follies," made
up entirely of Delta Gamma fresh-
men, was the last and crowning num-
ber of the program. There was a real

chorus, attired in fluffy, abbreviated immediately after the services of the
dresses, and large picture hats. The Student congregation.
leading lady, Catherine Riggs, '24, Judge Fisher recently returned

wore a stunning black frock, and
sang and flirted with the leading
man, Constance Smith, '24, in a truly
frightful manner.
After the vaudeville was over there
was dancing for an hour. The re-
freshments were served between danc-
es by waitresses wearing dainty white
caps and aprons.

from a tour of observation and serv-
ice in the war-stricken country of
which he will speak. He has made a
study of conditions in Eastern Eu-
rope and is in a position to give a
comprehensive discussion of the sit-
uation confronting the Jews in the
Old World. The meeting is open to
the public.

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