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December 02, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-02

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__.....

OFFICIAL 'NEWSPAPER, OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MIvCI-iIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatche,, credited to it or niot otherwise
credited in this paper and the lucal news published therein.
Entered at the p)stoffice at Ann Arbor, MIchigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3,50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Sneet.
Phones: Business, 6o; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo .words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if 'left at or' mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consi<eration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse_the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
*ews Editor..........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood JA enti
Su.ndaysEditor s... ......... A Ern
Editorials....... ... .Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News................... .......... . P. Lovejoy Jr.
sports.....................................Robert^Angel
Womens Editor......................-....Mary D.Lane
telegraph.................................;.West Gallogly
Telescope ...................................~Jack W. 'Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
Paul G. Weber, Thomas Ia. Dewey M. A. Klavez
Almena Barlow Wallace F.Elliott E. R. Meiss .
Elizabeth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beata Hasley
George Reindel 0 Hughston McBain Kathrine Montgomery
Dorothy Monfort Frank H. McPike Gerald P. Overton
Hlarry B. Grundy J. A. Bacon .Edward, Lanmbrecht
Frances Oberholtzer W. W. Ottaway William H. Riley Jr.
Robert E. Adams Paul Watzel Sara Waler
Norman C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960 .
BUSINESS MiANAGER-...-.....LEGRAND A: GAINES JR..
Advertising ........... ..... ...........,...........D.-P. Joyce'
Classifeds....... ...... .... .... ... . . e
Publication ... .............j. ................F. Mv. Heath
Accouts ............ E.R. lPriehs
culation.............. .......................... . H.llery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. .L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millara M. M. Moule_ . D. G. Slawson
J. J.*Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

it; on the other hand, if the majority should vote
in its favor with the distinct, understanding that to
vote 'yes' meant to assume the responsibility of up-
holding the code, the system would at once be placed
on a firm foundation."
The Daily followed these statements by a call to
the newly elected class officers to resolve on such a
referendum vote as their first act of officeathis fall.
It is gratifying to note that the seniors have come
out definitely for the honor system, and it is to be
hoped that they will have the real backing of the
other classes. We believe, in the words of the ar-
ticle' quoted above, that "at present, the honest man
and the hard worker who deserves a good grade is.
often prevented -from winning it by the rise in class
averages produced by the cheaters - a situation
which puts a.premium on laziness and dishonesty."

...._

G lmfmb

TWO STORES

#

Open Evenings Until Christmas

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

. n .
_.,_..

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, ,1920.

Night' E4itor-H. W. HITCHCOCK

...............

. ,_...

The Cubs' club ikill meet this afternoon at 4:1.5
o'clock in the reading rooms of the Press building.
All new tryouts should report.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
In the roll of college 'and university presidents
are the names of several Michigan graduates. An
incomplete list includes President=Emeritus Harry
B. Hutchins, '71; Charles Kendall Adams, '61,
president of Cornell university from 1885 until
1901; Mark Harrington, '68, president of the Uni-
versity of Washington; Alice Freeman Palmer,'76,
Wellesley, 1881-1887; Henry Wade Rogers, 74,
formerly presidqpt of Northwestern, later of New
York university; and Stratton Brooks, '96, of Ok-
lahoma.
EXTENDING THE HONOR SYSTEM
The senior lits have voted to draw up a plan by
which the honor system may be put in effect in
their college. We reprint below some of the state-
meats expressed in a Daily editorial on May 27,
1920, which apply e ually today.
"'n bringing up the question of extending the
honor system to all colleges of the' University, it
should be understood first of all that success de-
pends entirely upon the spirit of the student body.
There is no way to enforce it from without, for the
backbone of the honor idea is, as' expressed by the
president of the University of Virginia academic
class, 'The individual responsibility of each student,
who, if he does not report breaches of the code, is
himself considered as guilty as. the crook.'
"With this in' mind the building up ' of such a
system at Michigan assumes of course a far more
difficult aspect than the mere passing of an ordin-
ance by council or. Regents. It is obvious that be-
fore any such step is taken there must le a prac-
tical unanimity of opinion in its favor over the ens
tire canlpus. The code must be lived up to by the
whole' student body, and a spirit of determination
to do this must be evident before any action is
taken. Once the system has been laid down and'
a few violations punished by immediate and dras-
tic action backed by public opinon, it is certain to
grow into a' tradition,
"The Engineering college has succeeded in put-
ting the honor system into real effectiveness at all
examinations and bluebooks. There is beyond a
doubt a strong student sentiment in favor of en-
forcement, and a willingness to bring to punish-
ment the. man who refuses to abide 'by the rules.
Just whether the same results might be achieved in
the loosely organized, larger, and less heterogen-
eous Literary college is a difficult question, which
so. far has usually been answered, in the negative.
But considering the great steed of such a system,
it seems at least that the problem should be inves-
tigated more thoroughly than on mere grounds of
theory. If the entire campus were given a chance
to vote on the matter, and should decide against
installing the system, that of course wot!ld settle

ATTEND THE ALUMNI SMOKER
The football season of 1920 is over, and it has
left with the student body end Michigan's great
number of alumni a feeling that we have "come
back." Yes, we did come back, in athletic prowess
and in spirit, two essentials'to victory which go hand
in hand. Downk in Detroit, the alumni organiza-
tion in order. to show its appreciation to the team,
to Coach Yost .and his assistants, the managers,
cheer leaders, and all the others who aided in the
season's success, will hold a smoker - a "come-
back" smoker, they're calling it - and they want
every student, every true Michigan man, to be at
that smoker this Saturday.
The team will be there, Coach Yost will be there,
and many. other notables, men to whom Michigan
owes much of its progress, will also be present. It
will be a replica of the greatest pep meeting ever
held here, and nothing will be lacking to make the
affair' an event. that will linger long in the minds
of those who'attend.
Let's show the alumni that we are behind them,
and that we are going to make that "comeback"
spirit last, not for one season, but for many more
to come.,
Alumni smoker-Detroit-Saturday ! Three things
to remember, and one thing to do - be there !
SOCCER, FRONT AND CENTER
This year, because of the number of casualties
frequently resulting from inter-fraternity football,
the Intramural department changed its policy some-
what and brought in soccer as its fall sport. It is
a comparatively new form of athletics at Michi-
gan, but already the effort to push it to the front
has proved quite successful and soccer seems in its
first season to deserve a permanent place on our
athtletc menu.
Competition is not limited.to the fraternities,
however. In fact, there is one informal team on
the campus the members of which, although hav-
ing played only one outside game so far, are en-
thusiastic enough to put in a petition asking for
recognition of the game as a Varsity sport. Inter-
est and support shown by the entire University will
be necessary, however, to maintain soccer and gain
for it the rating which other and less beneficial
sports already possess. It is a good, open game,
requiring speed and wind and skill, and leading to
few injuries Are we going to keep it?
the TelescopeI
STANDING
No. of Contribs Points
Women.........32 96
Men......... .9o 90
Fighting with a tenacity of purpose that carried
all before its charge, the women of the University
, succeeded in wrestling the lead from the men and
are again ahead in the Humor Contest.
. To date the brunt of' most of the fighting has
fallen f only a, few girlish shoulders. Can it be
that the majority of Michigan Women can sit by
unmoved by the heroic struggle of their sisters?
Michigan Women, your path of duty is plain,
WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO?
On the mule we find
Two legs before,
And two behind.
We tickle those behind
Before we find'
What those behind be for.
Miss Mc Nut's Answers to Yesterday's Questions:
i. 'Yes, the bed of a lake is always covered with
a sheet of water.
2. Generally speaking, a person who fell in a
bed of lime would feel mortified.
3. The reason why so many Swiss watches do
not last a lifetime is because their hours are num-
bered.

4. A scientist would define steam as "water
gone crazy with heat."
5. Yes, a girl who engraves her name on a
god umbrella stands an excellent chance of losing
her good name.
6. The reason why a girl-buries her face on the
chest or shoulder of her dancing partner is be-
cause ordinarily his vest or coat front is easier to
look at than his face.
7. Half stockings are called either that or rub-
ber hose.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, filling his last cavity," he muttered as they
lowered the dentist into the grave.
NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITED iINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for,
Detroit at 6:05 a. M., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. in.
Limiteds to Jackson at-8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a.tm. and efery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit- : 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. mn.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40.p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7: 50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29
Men:

NOVEMBER
T W T
2 3 4
9 10 11
16 17 18
23 24 25 2
30

F
5
12
19
2.6

Last season's hats turn-

s
13
20
27

ed inside out, r.efinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just lik6 new; wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617-
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Ask for the
The Smart Looking, Popular Shoe
for CAMPUS
andCLASS ROOM
Ideal, All Round College Shoe
Same High Ovality as the
TOM LOGAN GOLF SHOE
If your dealer cannot supply you
write us for catalog and prices
THOMAS H.LOGAN COMPANY
Hudson. Mass.
Send for the 'jom Logan Calendar,
which pictures, suitable for framing,
the International Golf match between
Ouimet,, ,Ray and Var don.
The Newberry Tea Room at 432 So.
State is serving luncheon from 11:30
A. M. to 1 P. M. and dinner from 5:36
to 6:30 P. M. Weekly rates including
Sunday dinner, $6.50.Adv s
Read The Daily for Campus News

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SGONCE TRIED! ALWAYS BOUGHT!
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$3S to $70
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309 SO. MAIN ST,
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