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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 01, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.. ..:_

ftti [gttn 3 sily

. .

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it &r not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Una ed communications will receive no consideration. No mnan-
uscrpt will be returned unless the writer "incloses postage.
'Te Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What'sGoing On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors- .W iccc
T. H. Adams . W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis }
1. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent,jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor .. ...... . ..J. A. Bernstein
dditorials...........Lee. --+o.ruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News.............................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Snrts..'.. ....... .................Robert Angell
Tomes Editor...... ...................... .Mary D. Lane
Telegraph .. ............................ West Gallogly
Telescope. . . ..... . . . ..'Jack W. Kelly

EX-SENATOR ALBERT J. 3EVERIDGE
"* * * * Born on a farm in Ohio in 1862,
from the age of. twelve he led a life of hardships,
working as a plowboy, railroad laborer, logger, and
teamster until at fifteen he entered high school. In
1899 he was elected United States senator * * *"
Another of those impossible stories where the,
hero rises from messenger to bank president? It
might well be; but, as a matter of fact, the above is
an extract from the life of ex-Senator Albert J.
Beveridge, who speaks tonight in Hill auditorium
on "John Marshall and the Constitution," a subject
far removed from fiction, but one that should be of
interest to every student citizen.
Attending this lecture would be entirely worth
while for the college man and woman if for no
other reason than to hear a man speak who has
attained success in spite of handicaps far greater
than most of us have to contend with. But in ad-
dition Senator Beveridge has the reputation of be-
ing a speaker of unusual ability, was the chairman
of the 1912 Progressive National convention, and
is an author and a contemporary historian of note.

G A

TWO STORES

Openevenings Until Christmas

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

0

DETROIT UNITED LINES
in Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard.Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. M.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e ,ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit--S:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
M NTOVEMIBER

Choice Pictures Candlesticks
Tea Sets Pottery
LampsVook E nds

Christmas Suggestions

Josephine Waldo
Paul G. Weber
Almena Barlow
Elizabeth Vickery
G. E. Clark
George Reindel
Doothy Monort
Frances Oberholtzer
Robert E. Adams
Norman C. Damon

Assistants
Byron Darnton
Thomas $. Dewey
'Wallace P.Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer
Armstrong Kern
Hughston McBain
Frank H. Mc Pike
A. Bacon
W: Ottaway
Paul w atzel
Y. W. Hiume, Jr.

H. E. Howlett
M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
tBeata Haslety
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Waler

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 9A0
BUSINESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising....................................D. P. Joyce
classifieds................................. -...Robt: 0. Kerr
Pubica'tion..............--........ --...........F. M. Heath
Accounts...................... ......... ... R. Priehs
circulation ........................................V. V. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G, Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Milard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
7. J. Hamel Jr. . D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchel
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issuneof The Daily sho d see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be Printed that night.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1920.

THE JUNIOR COLLEGE
The junior college, now well past the experimen-
tal stage, stands as a most important adjunct and
contributing factor to the large universities. It has
not only relieved the strain on the bigger institu-
tions but it is offering two years of college work at
a minimum of cost to the student living at home
and, in many "cases, gives him a more thorough
training than he could receive at a crowded univer-
sity.
There is one change in the policy of these schools,
however, which, in the light of their increasing
popularity, seems necessary. That is a change of
atmosphere. Although this has been remedied in
some instances, the junior college, collectively con-
sidered, very noticeably lacks the atmosphere and
life that is always to be found in an independent
school.
Outside of being separated in its sports and activ-
ities from the high school with which it is housed,
the average junior college differs very little from
the preparatory grades.
Too rigid restrictions and supervision and the re-
sulting lack of personal responsibility are at the
bottom of this difference in atmosphere. The junior
college prepares the student for his later scholastic
work but it neglects the preparation for the other
important side of his educational endeavor - what
is gathered under the general head of college "life".
To fill its function completely, the junior. college
should expand sufficiently to give the student an
all-around undergraduate training and fit him to be
capable of filling the position of university upper-
classman.

1
7 $
14 15
21 22
28 29

2 3 4
9 10 11
16 17 18
23 24 25
30

5
12
19
26

6
13
20

Night Editor---T. W. SARGENT, JR.

I

De Fries Art Store
A 223 So. Main St,

I

---- ------mot

; _

KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Joseph Ripley, '76, designed the locks for the
Panama Canal.
Apartial list of other alumni who have become
prominent in science includes Robert S. Wood-
ward, '72E, president of the Carnegie Institution;
Charles F. Brush, '69E, inventor of the arc light;
Otto Klatz, '72E, director of the Dominion of Can-
ada: observatoty at Ottawa; and Howard Coffin,
'03E, automobile engineer and chairman of thewar
aviation board.
HITCHING UP WITH FACTS
When the Associated Press editors of Michigan
met in Ann Arbor on the day of the Illinois game
this fall, particular attention was given the plan by
which the practical side of actual newspaper pub-
lishing was to be allied with the theoretical phase
taught in the journialism school, by means of the
newly formed University Press club. The-presi-
dent of the r Press club was invited to explain the
project at the meeting of editors, but a general fav-
orable sentiment was evident throughout the con-
vention, based on the opinion that the club would
be beneficial to the newspapers as well as to the
journalism students.
there is little question that the club should per-
fqrm a considerable service in furnishing reporter
material, for the -papers of the state. From the
University point of view, however, the important
fact is that the annual conventions should provide
students an excellent opportunity to understand the
editor's obstacles and methods, his ideals and the
reasons why he often cannot attain them.
Some journalism schools take upon themselves
the teaching of the trade side of the profession.
As -Prof, John L. Brumm has put it, this extension
of ,the curriculum has scarcely more justification
than would the inclusion of shorthand among Uni-
versity courses. -Nor is there any sense in filling
the student's mind with the practicalities which are
continually tripping up theory in the average nyvs-
paper office. Theory can be adjusted to circum-
stances later -- and will be, as quick as the cub
falls under the eagle eye of the average city edi-
tor. But when all is said and done, it is well for
the journalist-graduate to have somewhere in the
back of his mind a distinct expectation that this
change is coming, and that he is going to have to
modify his more orthodox views when he meets
"the; real thing" that comes out of the presses in-
stead of the textbooks.
Because the editors will bring to Ann Arbor this
glimpse of the actual, and because their views and
those of the faculty will carry a real message to
every individual who is at ,al interested in the prob
lems of that great public utility, the newspaper,
Michigan will welcome the opening of the Press
club convention today as an informative opportu-
stity of the highest kind.

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
ITALIAN SOCIETY PUTS OFF
COMMEMORXA'JO_ OF RAPHAEL
Commemoration of the 400th anni-
versary of Raphael, "Italy's most be-
loved native artist," by the members
of the Il Circolo Italiano has been
postponed one week, the date of the
meeting now being Dec. 8. The ser-
vices will take place in Alumni Mem-
orial hall, where the public is invited
by the members to attend. Prof. Ar-
thur Cross of the fine arts department,
will give an address on "Raphael."
SPECIAL DELIVERY DOES NOT
INSURE LETTER, SAYS ABBOTT
According to Postmaster Horatio J.
Abbott of this city, there is an erron-
eous impression held by many persons
that a special delivery stamps takes
the place of registering or insuring
mail matter.
No indemnity is provided by law for
losses of unregistered or uninsured
mail bearing special delivery stamps,
nor does it insure unusual safety or
personal delivery to the ,addressee.
The Newberry 'ea Room at 432 So.
State is serving luncheon from 11:30
A. M. to 1 P. M. and dinner from 5:30
to 6:30, P. M. Weekly rates including
Sunday dinner, $6.50.-Adv.
LOOK THRU THE KEYHOLE
AT
"TWIN BEDS"
FOR LAUGHS

p4
Ice Sk ating.,,,
WILL SOON BE HERE
As a special inducement to students we offer our Season Tickets and
Admission Books at reduced prices on condition that all orders are in
on or before December 7.
40 Admissions in Bo Fk -.-$ .5 Before De. 7 $64
Individual Season Tickets-$4.0 ... Befor~ec.D 7t
Family Tickets, per Person--$ .5Q. eaore 'pv. 7
WEINBERG'S COLLISEUM - 725 t TIAYE

Thne Telescope
STANDING
No. of Contribs Points
Men ............78 78
Women........25 75
For the first time since the Contest began the
men are leading, but by a very slim margin. Now
that the full significance of what the losing of this
contest will mean has been grasped by both fac-
tions, those in closest touch with the situation pre-
dict a bitterly-contested and long drawn out strug-
gle such as the campus has not witnessed in years.
Girls, Do We Hear an Answer7
There was a girl in our town,
And she was passing fair;
She bought herself a big fur coat,
And thought a man she'd snare.

._.
,
: a r .

Give her a Hoover and
yOU give her the best

But when she found her little plan
Not working, in the main,
She got herself some wool half-socks,
And said she'd try again.
The gas went out to meter,
The egg went ott to beater,
The nutmeg went to grater,
But, alas, the radiator.

OUR SODAS
AND SUNDAES
ARE THEY GOODT
I'LL SAY THEY ARC
FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
Corner State and* Liberty

Instructor-Your mark is very low. You just
passed.
Co-ed-Oh, I'm so glad.
Inst. (surprised)-Why so?
Co-ed-Oh, you see I love a tight squeeze.
To the budding humorist who wrote in telling
the Editor' that Lorna Doone Jackson, judging by
her picture, rmust have been in the war, we say that
even though we can't see this kind of humor, we
still maintain we don't need glasses as badly as
some of The Daily's critics.
Truth
There's a sign on a store down on State
That says, "We mend shoes while you wait."
So there's no.need to fret
Or ask, "Ain't they done yet?" ,
They are mending your shoes while you wait.
Breathes there a girl with soul so 'dead,
Who never to her chum has said,
"My woolen hose itches"?
Famous Closing Lines
"Defeat again," muttered the bootblack as his
regular customer stuck out his foot.
NOAH COUNT.

4 tli 11111111 I 1111111tIII lilUlttl l I'.
SYou tell 'em
~ tate. Street .
~th ey all take ~
-~ a
Libe ty
~MEYER, Tailor
211 E. LIBERTY
tun En lliltIIIEt1l1-Nntu

ivp ler . i4hetim rinder your
thdughtfulness, Give her smil e4 4
future cleaning days, Give her an as
Jate home every day every year,
GMve her a HoQver and, you give her tho'
best -the best expression of loyg Q -g
slderatlon and the best e minatov of work
and dirt. For you give her an eleCtric
vacuui cleaner-and an electric crpet
sweeper -and an electric rug beater;a
three in one.
M artin Haler
Furniture .Rugs
112-122 E. Liberty St.

1J ' I

- - - - - - - -- -
Xmas Greeting Car-ds, Stationery, 7'purtainPes
hooks, Pennants,Leather Goods, Souvenirs of all Kinds
Let Us Suggest

STUDENTS' SUPPLY STORE
1160-R 1111 South University

Phone

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