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December 01, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-01

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BABLY RAIN
TODAY I

g 5kr

~Iati

ASSOCIATED
PRES
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE.
SERVICE

---- - . -4

XXXI. No. 49.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1920.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

I

MEXICO WILL NOT,
PETIT/ON LEAGUE1
f oR ADMISSION

WILL CONSIDER INVITATION
EXTENDED BY ORGAN-

IF

IZATION
OBREGON INAUGURATED
MEXICAN PRESIDENT

LAST CHANCE FOR
$5 UNION RATE
If Union life members in their last
year of residence at the University
wish to save $5, they must make a
payment on their pledge today. Last
night was the time limit set by the
constitution, but officials extended the
time for an extra day only, because
many students receive checks on the
first of the month.
By giving credit for $5 paid in fees
to the University, the Union requires
a payment of only $5 today, and this
constitutes the regular annual $10
payment. Otherwise, life members
must make a payment at some later
time this college year, and such pay-
mgnt will be $10.
As this $5 credit feature was one
of the selling points of life member-
ships, officials are expecting a large
number of payments today.
S POTLI GHT.,WI'LL
B1EGIVEN TUESDAY1

General Declares Solicitation
Membership Humiliating Act
for Country

for

(By Associated Press)
Mexico City, Nov. 30.-"Mexico will
not ask admission to the League of
Nations, but should an invitation to
membership be extended by the league
it would be given consideration."
this declaration was made by Gen.
Alvaro Obregon, president-elect of the
-republic, today in an interview with
the Associated Press, during which
he discussed various problems that
are likely to demand his attention
when: he assumes the presidency at
midnight tonight.
Maintains Old Policy
General Obregon said he was cer-
tain the provisional government under
President de la Huerta had not re-
quested such membership and it was
the intention of his government to
continue this policy of aloofness, his
attitude being that Mexico in making
overtures for membership in the
ieague would engage In a humiliating
act, :entirely inconsistent with its tra-
ditional national pride, .
General Obregon prefaced his dis-
oiesion of Mexican problems with
an expression of gratitude for the
courtesy s~own him by the hun-
dreds of American visitors who are in
Mexico City for his inauguration.
"It indicates a better feeling be-
tween the two countt'les which will
continue to grow," he stated.
Faces Reconstruction
'"The great problem I face as the
next ?vexican executive is that of gen-
eVal reconstruction. I have reflected
my attitude toward various problems
At a series of projects which I have
already submitted to congress for
consideration,
"Of first interest to Americans of
course is the oil problem. I am sure
that within a short time a commission
will be appointed to regulate the ap-
plication of articles relating to the
oil industry which have been found
ebjectonable by Americans. I feel
Certain that this problem ultimately
will be settled to the entire satisfac-
tion of all concerned," declared the
general.
Pacifieation Great Work
Asked what he considered the most
significant results accomplished'- by
the Mexican government which re-
tires tonight, General Obregon an-
swered that undubtedly its greatest
work was the pacification of the re-
public, which, he added, "is a se-
quence to the revolutionary move-
iment of last summer."
CLASS OFFICIALS
MEET THURSDAY
A meeting of class officers of all
0phools and"coleges of the University
far 7:15 o'clock. Thursday evening at
the Uipon has been called by Le-
Qrand A. Ggines, president of the Stu-
Oeit pouncil, In order that their duties
May be explained to them.
At this time plans will be discuss-
ed for furthering the collection of all
class dues, and it is probable that
some solution will be reached by
which a larger percentage of the class
members will pay their yearly fees.
"For this reason it is absolyitely nec-
essary that all presidents and treas-
urers be present," -said Gaines.
The amount that each class will
owe the council this year will be an-
nounced at this meeting by the coun-
cil treasurer. The sum is being de-
termined by the number of students
in each- class.
Embassy at Vatican Re-established
Paris, Nov. 30.-The bill for re-es-
tablishment of an embassy at the Vat-

lcan was adopted by the chamber of
deputies today by a vote of 39'7 to

Deviations ,from Usual Songs
Dances Included in This
Year's Show

and

GENUINE HYPNOTIST ACT TO
HEAD BALANCED PROGRAM
With a program containing some
deviations from the usual song and
dance presentations, the Spotlight
vaudeville will appear next Tuesday
evening at Hill auditorium. The show
this year is featured by a bona fide
hypntist's act, which is put on by
Robert F. Deebach, '23, an e-vaude-
ville performer on Pacific coast cir-
cuits where he had several years' ex-
perience. This is Deebach's first ap-
pearance in University 'productions,
and Spotlight officials are confident
that his act will set q new standard
for the student specialty actors. -
Tickets for the show, which is
scheduled for 8 o'clock, Dec. 7, are
now on sale at local bookstores and
the campus will be canvassed In the
course of' the week, .
Following is the program in detail:
Michigan Union orchestra, "Morning,
Noon, and Night in Vienna"; Lorenzo
Walters, '23, and George Schemm, '23,
"Tidbits of Chatter and Song"; Rob-
ert F. Deebach, '23, and company,
hypnotism; Myron E. Chon, '23, saxo-
phone artist with George Rene Lynn,
'22, at the piano; James C. Brown, '23,
"Chalk Talk"; George Rogers, 21E,.
and his orchestra; Michigan Union
orchestra.
PLAYERS CLUB TO MEET FOR
FIRST TIME IN HISTORY TODAY
ProfessoY Hollister, Sponser of Organ.
ization, Declares It Educa-
tional in Ams
"The new Players' club will meet
today at 4 o'clock in room 205 Mason
hall for the first time in its history,"
stated Prof. R. D. Hollister of the
oratory department, who is the sppn-
ser of the new project. "The club
will be addressed by Profs. R. W.
Cowden and T. E. Rankin of the rhet-
oric department and Dr. J. R. Moore
of the English department, who will
outline the plan of organization and
possibilities of the club."
Professor Hollister intends that the
organization will be essentially edu-
cational in its alms. All students and
members of the faculty who seriously
desire to join the club will be given
an opportunity to make application at
this meeting in the form of ques-
tionnaires, in which the applicant
states what line of work he wishes to
takeup. These may include acting,
play-writing, play translation, and
interpretations.
PROPOSAL FOR TREATY SENT
TO MEXICO BY SEC. COLBY
Washington, No. 30. - A formal
proposal of Secretary Colby that com-
missioners be appointed by the Unit-
ed States and Mexico to draft a treaty
upon which can be based resumption
of full diplomatic relations between
the two governments has been taken
to Mexico City by Roberto V. Tes-
queira, Mexican confidential agent in
Washington.'

UNIVERSITY PRESS
CLUB OPENS MEET
WITH SMOKER
JAMES SCHERMERHORN, EDITOR
DETROIT TIMES, WILL
GIVE TALK
ORGANIZATION WANTS
STUDENT ATTENDANCE
Newspapermen to be Conducted About
Campus Friday Morning on
Inspection Tour
Following a resolution to foster a
closer relationship between the edi-
tors of the state and the University,
the University Press Club of Michigan
will open its second annual conven-
tion here this evening. The first
meeting will be held in the form of a
smoker, given at 8 o'clock tonight
in 318-320 of the Union.
James Schermerhorn, of the Detroit
Times, who is to be the speaker at this
event is one of the best known Mich-
igan newspapermen and is also rec-
ognized as a forceful speaker, accord-
ing to Prof. John L. Brumm, head of
the department of journalism.
Want Students at Meetings
Reiterating his statement of yes-
terday, Professor Brumm said that it
is the wish of the organization that
the students of the University feel free
to attend any of the open meetings
during the convention.
"The smoker this evening at which
Mr. Schermerhorn talks, I have no
doubt, will be of interest to a large
number of students here. The Press
club is of the opinion that much that
may be said at its meetings would be
beneficial to students who are inter-
ested in newspaper work, and it is be-
cause of this that all meetings, with
the exception of the two business ses-
sions during the convention, are open
to them."
Registration Progresses
Registration for the conference is
at the present time progressing well,
according to a statement from Profes-
sor Brumm. Among the newspaper
editors there are a few women who
are signifying their Intention of at-
tending the meetings.
The tour of- inspection about the
campus, which will be conducted Fri-
day morning will do much to acquaint
the newspapermen from various parts
of the state with the needs of the
University. The faculty have been
asked to assist in every way possible
during the time that the newspaper-
men are visiting the buildings.
MICHIGAN LAW EIEW
HOLDS K HHPOSITION
MAGAZINE RECEIVED BY BEST
SCHOOLS, LAWYERS, AND
COAiTTS ,
The high position the Michigan Law
Review holds in the legal profession
was brought out by remarks of speak-
ers at a dinner of that publication
last evening In the Union.c
lEmphasizing this was a statement
made by Dean Henry Bates of the
Law school to the effect that the

president of the American Sugar re-t
finery, who is reputed to be the high-
est paid man in the country, recently
said the Law Review was his con-
stant guide.J
The standard of the magazine was
also brought out by Prof. Ralph W.
Aigler, editor-in-chief of the Re-
view, who stated that the journal was
sent to every important law school,j
every important court and to manyi
of the greatest jurists in the coun-
try.
G. A. Ohlinger, '02L, a member of
the original staff, told of the auspic-
ious circumstances under which the;
magazine was launched, it having as
its managing editor, Prof. Floyd1
Meachem. The latter was termed by
the speaker as one of the greatest
writers of law the world has known.
Professor Meachem set the high
standards, which the Review has since
striven to maintain, according to Mr.
Ohlinger,

"The Comeback Smoker" is the
name which the University of Michi-
gan club of Detroit has given to the
function which that organization Is
tendering to the members of the Var-
sity, reserve, and freshman football
squads, the coaches, the trainer, the
faculty members of the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics, and the cheer lead-
ers next Saturday night at the De-
troit Board of Commerce.
The speakers of the evening will
be Prof. J. C. Parker, Robert H. Clan-
cy, field secretary of the Athletic as-
sociation, Judge Ira W. Jayne, and
Assistant Coach Prentiss Douglass.
James K. Watkins, president of the
"M" club, is general chairman for the
CONFERENCE COURT
TICKETS LIITED
Each Student to See Two Big Games
Is Plan of Council, Adopted
by Board
NON-TRANSFERABLE TICKET
RULE WAIVED IN THIS CASE'
Tickets for Conference basketball
games will be distributed during the
early part of January, according to a
statement made yesterday by the Ath-
letic office. Due to the fact that Wat-
erman gymnasium will accommodate
only 2,200 students it was found nec-
essary last year to pair the six home
Conference games in order that each
student might see at least two games.
This scheme of arrangement will be
followed out this year, although the
manner in which the games will be
grouped has not been definitely de-
cided.
The games are arranged so that a
period of time is involved between
them and so that the student will see1
two good games. The non-transfera-
ble rule is waived in this case, which
means that if a student has a ticket
for a game which he cnnot attend
he may give it 'to some other stu-
dent.
Further announcement at a later.
date will be made as to exactly how
the games will be played.
Directories Sell '
.fast First rDay
More than 1,100 copies of the Stu-
dent directory were sold in about 20
minutes yesterday morning on the1
campus and as many more students
were turned down because the supply
available was not sufficient to meet
the enormous demand. The books
were sold as fast as they could be
brought .over from the Directory of-
fice, and in many cases the salesmen
had entirely disposed of their allot-
ment before reaching their assigned
stations.
The remaining 1,100 copies will go,
on sale at 10 o'clock this morning.
After these are sold no more copies
will be available. The directory this
year is somewhat smaller than the
edition last year due to the fact that
the Ypsilanti section has been dis-
continued.
A directory supplement will be
printed in the near future with cor-
rections and additions to the regular
directory and ac this time all changes
of address or telephone numbers wIll
be listed.
ADELPHI FAVORS RAISING

OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
Raising of the entrance require-
ments would be the greatest improve-
ment for the University of Michigan,
it was decided through debate at the
Adelphi House of Representatives'
meeting last night. That the students
on the campus are beginning to real-
ize that they must work to remain
and that others to come must learn
something of what work is before
they arrive, was given as one of the
main reasons for this decision.
Some of the other questions dis-
cussed that might benefit the Uni-
versity were: democracy and respect
for University women, the budget
system, dormitories for men, and a
revision of the faculty.

Varsity, Reserve, Fresh Squads To
Be At Detroit U. of J7. Club Smoker

event. J. Fred Lawton will lead the
gathering in songs and cheers.
Band to Be There
Michigan's Varsity band will be on
hand, as well as the 37th United
States Infantry band, which was se-
cured by Major Dean Halford and Col.
H. E. Eames, now stationed at Fort
Wayne in Detroit.
Two special cars will leave the in-
terurban depot at 1:10 o'clock Sat-
urday to convey the guests to . De-
troit. Upon their arrival they will be
taken to the Adams theater, where
John H. Kunsky, motion picture mag-
nate, will furnish mezzanine boxes for
the entire company. Following this
the Varsity squad will be taken to the
University club, corner of Jefferson
and Russell, -for dinner as guests of
the "M" club. Since there are not su-
ficient accommodations for all the
party there, the reserve and freshman
squads will go to dinner at the Board
of Commerce as the guests of Erwin
and Roscoe B. Huston
Smoker Is at S O'clock
-The smoker is set for 8 o'clock at
the Board of Commerce. The two
footballs won in the Chicago and
Minnesota games and "the little
brown jug" will be on exhibition.
"M" pipes with the numerals "20" on
them will be given the members of
the teams. The quartet of Mimes will
render various college and popular
songs throughout the evening. Re-
freshments will be served.
SIEOS MAOR 'HONOR
SYSTEM IN IT SCHOOL
PLAN ALMOST UNANIMOUSLY
FAVORED AT CLASS
MEETING
Favorable comment greeted the sub-
ject of the honor system, and a mo-
tion that such a system be adopted in
the literary college was passedtalmost
unanimously by the senior lit class
at its meeting yesterday afternoon in
the Natural Science auditorium.
A committee was appointed to per-
feet the details of such a plan and at
some early date the result of the com-
mittee's revision will be placed in the
hands of the faculty for approval.
Considerable interest was shown in
the possibility of the adoption of the
honor system in the literary college,
and the discussions were numerous
and lengthy before the question was
finally submitted to the class for bal-
lot.
Pierce McLouth, '21, chairman of
the social committee, announced that
final plans had been made for a class
smoker to be held the evening of
Dec. 14, at the Union. President Mar-
ion L. Burton and Dean John R. Ef-
finger will the principal speakers at
the smoker.
A new -plan of preserving commit-
tee records was explained and "pass-
ed on by the class by which all com-
mittee chairmen will be obliged to
write out their reports and file them
away where they may be readily ac-
cesible to committee chairmen in the
years to come. Such a plan is deem-
ed necessary by the class officers in
order that statistics will be available
to the succeeding chairmen.
Class dues of $3.50 were assessed
and will be collected from 2 to 4
o'clock next Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday afternoons at the booth in
University hall.
Members of the class were advised
to have their pictures for the Michi-
ganensian taken at soon as possi-
ble, and it was especially emphasized
that chairmen of committees have

their pictures taken as the cuts for
officers and committeemeh are among
the first to be made.
LIBRARIAN BISHOP RETURNS
FROM 10 DAY EASTERN TRIP
Librarian W. W. Bishop returned
yesterday from a 10 day trip in the
East where he addressed the library
school of the New York pul;ic library,
and attended a meeting at Columbia
uinversity of the librarians from the
eastern universities.
He also attended the Edgar sale of
historical books but on account of the
high prices purchased only one book.
Mr. Bishop procured books for the
various reading rooms in the Library
at New York book stores.

iC
BEVEIDGE WILL,
GE FIRST TL
IN CITY TONIGHT'.
FORMER INDIANA SENATOR FIN
ISHED ORATOR, SAYS
TRUEBLOOD
IS TO BE TENDERED
DINNER BY PROFESSORS
Address Is of Particular Interest -to
Political Science, Law, and
History Students
Albert J. Beveridge, ex-senator from
Indiana, who will speak on "The De-
velopment of the Constitution Under
Chief Justice Marshall" tonight in
Hill auditorium, has won every ora-
torical contest which he has entered.
When he was a senior at DePauw
university in 1885 he won the state
of Indiana contest and the inter-
state contest between eight states.
Beveridge Great Orator
"Mr. Beveridge is one of the most
finished orators in the country," said
Prof. T. C. Trueblood of the oratori-
cal department. "He has never been
here before, and although we have
tried for years to get him to speak in
Ann Arbor, this is the first time we
are sure of having him."
. Arriving in Ann Arbor at $ o'clock
this afternoon, Mrr Beveridge will be
tendered a dinner at the Union by
more than 20 men of the law,history,
and political science departments and
the Oratorical association. He will be
the guest of Professor Trueblood at
the Union tonight and will leave
Thursday to go to New- York, Buffa-
lo, and Wichita, Kansas, where he will
talk to the bar associations on the
same subject.
Speaks Only in Ann Arbor
Senator Beveridge was also invited
to speak before the Detroit Bar asso-
ciation, but as he was able to fill only
one engagement in Michigan, he de-
cided to speak to students. The De-
troit Bar association has been invited
to attend the lecture.
The address will be of special in-
terest to political science, law, his-
tory, and government students as Mr.
Beveridge is a statesman, author and
publicist.
Tau lietat Pi Has
Neophyte Bauqet
The initiation banquet of Tau Beta
Pi, national honorary scholastic en-
gineering society, was held at the
Union last night. E. E. Dreese of the
mechanical engineering department
acted as toastmaster, while Prof. H.
C. Sadler of the marine engineering
department, Lawrence F. Frost, '211,
and S. W. Traylor, '21E, were the
speakers.
The following are the neophytes In
whose honor the banquet was given:
R. B. Alexander, M. B. Covell, W. I,.
Gridley, A. M.' Holmes, E. A. Kerby
J. M. Miller, G. H. Roderick, K H.
Sherman, S. W. Traylor, L. VanHorn,
and C. B. Wetzel. All are senior en-
gineers with the exception of MorneI'
who is an ex-'20E.

MICHIGAN PROFESSORS WILL
ATTEND SCIENCE MEETING
Dr. W. P. Lombard of the physiology
department, Dr. F. G. Novy, professor
of bacteriology, Dr. E. E. Nelson, and
Dr. C; W. Edmunds of the department
of pharmacology will attend the'
'meetings of the. Federation of Biolog-
ical Sciences to be held the week. of
the Christmas vacation in Chicago.
Dr. Lombard is president of the
Physiology society which is a branch
of the federation.

r
r

MICHIGANENSIAN T

NOTICES

I

All fraternities, sororities, and
organizations must have pic-
tures taken for the Michiganen-
sian before Chmristmas vaca-
tion. This is final.
All men taking snapshots for
the Michiganensian are to meet
today at 5:30 in Press building.

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