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November 28, 1920 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

MICHIGAN

DAILY

....

ichigan

S

Adopt*

Aptitude

Test

Plan

"When reliable tests are worked out HIGHWAY COURSES
they will certainly aid men and women PROVING POPULAR
in choosing professions. If this Uni-
versity is divided into a Junior and
Senior college I believe they can be (Continued from Page One)
given to advantage in the former feet of laboratory floor space~ in addi-
place." tion to offices and computing rooms,
The tests given last year in the and is equipped with the necessary
Engineering college to first year men apparatus for testing paving brick,
F. .4 1...,J- L7.. - - tn n k1-.l arnnrl..-..-r 1 LI - A-

highway construction and mainten-
ance. In addition the Davis Library
of Highway Engineering, and High-
way Transport is open and available
at all times. Containing all authorita-
tive books, reports and periodicals in
its specialized, field, it constitutes the
most complete collection of literature
on these subjects which is available
in America.

(By William W. Ottaway)
Tests to determine the professional
aptitudes of students may be brought
into use by the University of Michi-
gan in the near future. The tests are
now a part of the system of several
American universities, including
Pennsylvania and Columbia. Mem-
bers of the faculty of both the Lit-
erary and Engineering colleges, of
this University, are of the opinion
that the tests may ultimately be
adopted here. The tests are a subject
of much discussion throughout the
United States. Many large concerns
are employing them to select their
forces and finding them highly satis-
factory, while other firms have dis-
continued their use.
Men prominent on the faculty of
this University while adhitting their
value to a certain extent, are divided
as to whether a true result of- the stu-
dent's capacity in a certain profes-
sion may be obtained through the
medium of the tests because of the
presence in the individual taking the
tests, of certain qualities.
Not Satisfactory, Declares
These qualities, according to Dr.'
Henry F. Adams of the Psychology de-
partment, enter into the result of the
tests to such an extent that they do
not reflect the student's professional
aptitude, and therefore can not be sat-
isfactory. He states that no tests
have been devised as yet which will
test the above qualities, but when
they are invented, a true test may be
made.
"The intelligence test," he said,
"shows the mental level of the occu-
pation in which the student stands
the best chance for success, although
the particular vocation may not be
determined. The application of these
tests to the student is by analogy. The

test in which those who are mostl

efficient get the best marks and those
who are least efficient get the worst
marks becomes the test for that par-
ticular job. The tests take a long
time to give and to grade. It is to be
hoped that some will be devised in
the near future which will be more
advantageous for selecting the indi-
vidual for the particular job. Tests
devised so far give only the student's
mentality. They do not take into ac-
count his mental, emotional, and voli-
tional qualities. Tests must measure
that side of a person's nature."
Dr. Adams stated that few indus-
tries in America use these tests in
the selection of a working force.
Marshal Field and company employed
them for a time to secus salesper-
sons, but later gave up the system as,
unsatisfactory. The Winchester Arms
company got the same results. The
Packard Motor Car company after a
time discontinued the useof the tests
for the seletion of stenographers.
Men themselves will not take time to
undergo tests for which they receive
no recompense.
, Used in Army
"The army tests," said Dr. Adams,
"concerned themselves with the in-
dividual who was placed in a group;
and the average range of marks for
the occupation figured. The men in
the highest professions as a general;
rule got the best grades, while the
lowest grades went to unskilled labor.
"In the process of time tests will
be devised which will show the in-
dividual which profession he is best
fitted for. The present tests are un-
satisfactory becaues they do not take
into account volitional, moral, and
emotional qualities."
Prof. Henry H. Higbie of the Engi-
neering college, prophesies that the

tests will be ultimately used in the
Engineering college. He has himself
devised a test to determine the con-
scientiousness of a student taking the
mental tests thus removing from the
result a quality which hitherto affect-
ed it Considerably. He is of the opinion
that other quality tests, including
those to determine the student's -driv-
ing power and interest may be worked
out in the near future.
"Before many years," stated Pro-
fessor Higbie, "I believe the Engi-
neering college will use the mental
test' to determine the professional
aptitude of a student. It is a fine
thing, and I heartily approve of it.
"The tests given in this college last
year to determine the mental advance-
ment of first year engineering stu-
dents since their graduation from
high school brought out too much the
alertness and perception of the men.
With the inventing-of tests for these
qualities, mental tests will be more
satisfactory."
Determine "Man For Job"
Prof. Guy M. .Whipple of the Edu-
cational department, is of. the opinion
that the tests may determine the man
for the jom but not the job for the
man. He, too, is positive that per-
sonal qualities enter to such an ex-
tent that they are biased, but that
even with these drawbacks the tests
are far from unsatisfactory.
"Mental tests," says Professor
Whipple, "originated at Carnegie In-
stitute with which I was formerly
connected. There are many large
concerns in the United States using
the tests at the present time and find-
ing them highly satisfactory. Among
the latter are the Equitable Life In-
surance company, Kauffman depart-
ment stores, Packard Motor Car com-
pany, and others."
Small beginnings have been made,
according to Professor Whipple, to
draw up'tests which will give a man's
emotional, mental, and volitional
qualities. When these tests are made
perfect the above qualities will not
enter into the results and a profes-
sion in which a man may succeed may
be determined.
"The city of Detroit," said Profes-
sor Whipple, "gives tests to all first
graders. Children are placed into
one of three groups, according to the
grade they received in the test. Co-
lumbia university gives mental tests
to entering students which replace the
old examinations in high school
subjects."
May Be Given Here
Registrar Arthur Hall is of the
opinion that mental tests are likely to
be given here in the future if plans
now under consideration for the di-
vision of the University into a Junior
and a Senior college are- put through.
Unless this result is accomplished the
tests, he believes, should take place
during the final year at preparatory
schools. He says:

to determine their mental advance-
ment since graduation from high
school are the subject of much discus-
sion among th. University faculty."
NEVER Mis sBI HGAMES
IS BERT YORK'S MOTTO,
(Continued from Page 2)
wedge. This was a mass formation,
in which one man surrounded by
players to push him would attempt to
carry the ball through the line. "'An-
other play was the revolving wedge.
In this formation, the player with
the ball would be the center of a
group of men whirling about him,
they would move forward all the time
and when the opportunity offered it-
self the player carrying the ball
would break away and attempt to
penetrate the line./
The 11 men who entered the game
at the start, would almost in every
instance play throughout the contest
unless the coach wished to give the
"scrubs" an opportunity.
Contrary to the general belief, how-
ever, accidents- were fewer in those
days than at the present time, ac-
cord ng to York. There was also less
dissension on a football team 15 or
20 years ago than there is liable to
be now.
"In those days, a man would con-
sider himself fortunate if he earned
his "M" in his last year," said York.
"He would probably work hard for
several years and would look forward
to the time when he would b good
enough for the Varsity. Now, some
players become discouraged if they
do not make the Varsity in their first
year of eligibility."
When asked to name the hardest
fought football game ever played by
Michigan, York mentioned the game
with Nebraska, played in Detroit in
1898.
According to York, the best Michi-
gan eleven was that of 1902, known
as the "point-a-minute" team. It was
during this season that Yost earned
his title, "Hurry Up."
When asked his opinion of Yost,-
York said, "In my, opinion, Coach Yost
is the best coach that ever breathed.
There isn't anything about football
that Yost doesn't know. He exerts an
influence over his men that is felt in
after life and he is a man of splendid
character and personal habits. Yost
is a gentleman from the word go,"
concluded York.
York also spoke highly of this
year's football team and the prospects
for next year. "The football team
could have won the championship this
year with anything like an even break
in luck," said York.
"If eligible, however, I think we'll
have a world beater next year. The
Alumni association and the 'M' club
have been working hard to secure
promising young athletes for Michi-
gan, and the results of their work will
be evidenced in Michigan athletic
teams next year."

stone blodk, wood block, rock, sand!,
concrete, and other materials ised in

I-
TODAY'S CHURCH SERVICES
ANN ARBOR PRESBYTERIAN
BIBLE CHAIR CHURCH
Cor. Huron and Division
Headquarters in, Lane Hall.
Classes meet in the "Upper LEONARD A. BARRETT,
Room." MINISTER
Upper ftom Bible Class Sat-__
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning. Morning Theme - "The God we
Ask for printed circular an- Need Today."
pnouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin. Dr. Iden's class as usual.
THOMAS M. IDEN, Theme for C. E. Service - "The
Instructor. ' New Life of China."
CHURCH OF CHRIST & Ub reue "iyirod
DISCIPLES'4
S ut University Ave. Cor. Catherine and Division Sts.
F. P.ARTHUR, PASTOR
:---BRev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector
9:30 Ar. M.-Bible School. Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
Maurice rT'aylor, Supt.
6:30 P. M. - C. E. Wm. Og-
den, President.
Mr. Arthur gives the last of his 7:35 A. M.-Holy Communion.
historical sermons on "The 10:30 A. M. - Morning Prayer
Disciples of Christ" Sunday and Sermon by the Rector,
morning at 10:30. Subject: "Incomplete Morality."
".Does It Work?" 4:30 P. M. - Evening Seryice
Sunday evening subject: "God and Address by the Qurate,
Is Just." "A Lesson Forgotten." ,
FIRST UNIJARIAN CHURCH
BAPTIST CHURCH State and un Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minsiter
Huron St., Below State
November 28
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER 10 :0A . - "The Discovery
321" East Ann Street of Happiness.1' Happiness is
not a state of being but a
matter of proper functioning.
If it requires forgetting one-
self it requires just as much
finding oneself. This is a
10:30 A. M. - J. M. Wells will part of what we see in those
speak on "A New Ann Arbor." 'who have actually discovered
happiness.
11:50 A. M.-Howard R. Chap- 5:45 P. M. -V. P. R. U. Social
man wehll speak to the Guild Hour.
Class. 6:30 P. M. '- Professor R. W.
Sellars: "Other Gods." (See
6:30 P. M. - Guild Meeting. the first Commandment.)
,I

F you would know real smoke contentment, just you smoke
I a W D C Pipe full of your favorite tobacco. Then you'll
know what a real French briar is, and what the Demuth
seasoning will do to make it break in sweet and mellow.
Ask any good dealer to show you a variety of shapes, then
pick yours.
WM. DEMUTH & CO.. NEW YORK
WORLD'S LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES

ENG. NOTICE-
Just Received a Bunch of
LOG L GSLI DE RULES
Special Price while They Last at the Only
STUDENTS' SUPPLY STOR E
Ill South University Phone 1160R
HIf 11mlll Ii 111l 111111 11111E[Ikll 1111i i [I E11tt l 16 lEX 111011 ll l tii iill iO10fll ti i 111 li 3l 11i G

is

-
Silk Hosery and Underwear

ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCHU
Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
120 Packard Street
We specialize in bringing
Christ to man and man to
Christ. We invite your co-
operation.
Sunday, November 28
Morning sermon 10:30 (Ger-
man) - "Nearing the Goal."
Nnl )I '"iII iU J t n t11-M a m

oII

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER, D.D., Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MORE, Student Director
November 28, 1020'
10:30 A. M.-Sermon to Seekers after Truth, by the Pastor.
12:00 M.-Bible School.
6:00 P. MV.-Social Half Hour.
6:30 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild devotional meeting, Mr.,Joyce Stedman,
Leader.
7:30 P. M.-Special Musical Program.
Evening Program
Choir Hymn-"Softly ,Now the Light of Day."
Quartette-"Some Sweet Day" (Speaks).
Offertory. -
Solo-"Out of Heaven" (Cowen). Mrs. Wheeler.
Quartette-"Christ, We Do-all Adore Thee" (From the Seven Last
Words) (Dubois)A
A CORDIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TM~ALL STUDE~NTS

III

jIr~1 1-r-11r[ff -it- iFIIF I i I iiFIIFIIFl l

III

nui ummunon a i:6 am
SEvening sermon at 7:30 (Eng-
* I lish) - "What of a Personal
DARLING & MALLEAUX Christ" a n CONGREGATIONAL (
224-226 SOUTH STATE STREET 7 NICKELS ARCADE
Ilitlil i ll11_C itl illlill~ l I iliu llu lilllli (Iillllll(11111#!#111111111Il lIIiliI11N#ti #111111#111!#Ii1111G1#!
'llh lilllllilllli lillll111illlil illllll#
ESTABLISHED 1889
E B E TRINITY LUTHERAN
Let us help to make your rooms - - CHURCH 10:30 A. M.-Mr. Douglas pre
cheerful for the winter months.
Fifth Ave. and William St. = "MAKING READY FOR CHRI
Rev. Lloyd Merl Walick,
PAINTING PAPERHANGING CALSOMINING lPastor
WE CAN DO YOUR WORK PROMPTLY Morning Service at 10:30.
The sermon is the first of a
-( series dealing with the sig- P'6:45 P. M..........Vesp
Snificance of the birth of 'FI
0SW A D A H ERZ hit
~hrt-SPECIAL MUSIC BY THE 'F
12 Washington St.DPhone 353-F1 Sunday..School at 11:30.
2111 W sh IIIin goI n St. pIII111 I lHH1 illHH I IIullilll illI I~iul il t l ilI llllillllitillI lll lllt l i llllll lll llllllllil 11111 :

a6&wM.LJ' t&LJW ~ ii

CHURCH ,

m

aches on
STMAS"

m'

er Choral

1

EHOIR

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