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November 28, 1920 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-28

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DAILY

I r

x
_

NSTRUMENTS
CAL MUSEUM.

etion in Hill Auditorium
Care of Professor
Stanley

Under

:SPECIMWENS OF PERIOD SEVERAL
HUNDRED YEARS BEFORE CHRIST
(By G. E. Sloan)
Few of the students at Michigan
realize, perhaps, that Hil1 auditorium
houses .a collection of musical instru-
ments surpassed only by that of the
Metropolitan Museum of New York
City. The collection comprises over
1,100 separate numbers and contains
specimeis from several hundreds
years before Christ (such as Roman
flutes) to the latest model of that
most modern musical development-
the saxophone.

Among the more antique members
of the drum family on exhibition'
might be mentioned the Teponatzli,
used in ancient Mexico; the solid
wooden drum of the Upper Congo,
Africa; and the M'kul or Nku of the
French Congo, Africa. The latter are
called the "talking drums" and under
the manipulation of an expert native
convey information with accuracy and
incredible rapidity.
Clarinet Invented 1690
The clarinet, invented about 1690
by John Christopher Denner of
Nuermberg, soon found its place in
the orchestra. The exhibit shows its
development in France, Germany,
England, Austria, Italy, Belgium, and
the United States.
The saxaphone was first construct-
ed by Adolphe Sax of 1 -assels in
1844. While the saxophone has not
the range nor rapidity of execution
of the clarinet it has (when no
forced) a very sympathetic tone, mid-
way between that of a "reed" instru-
ment and a "brass" horn. A C tenor
instrumetn from the workshop of

Adolphe Sax himself may be seen in
case six.
The bag-pipe is of special interest
as it combines the clarinet type
(drone) with the oboe (chaunter). It
was known to the Babylonians, is
mentioned in Sanscrit treatises on
music and used by the Hebrews,
Greeks and Romans. In case seven
can be seen varous types ranging
from the rude Souqqareh of Africa in
which the bag is made of the skin of
some wild animal with the hair re-
tained, to the Biniou de Berry, a beau-
tifully 1icorated instrument of
French manufac, ure.
The structure of the violin seems
to violate all scientific principles but
through the work of generations of
inspired makers it may be said to
have reached perfection. The choicest

example of its kind is the "Viola d'
Amci e" (Italy or France). This beau-
tiful instrument of the Seventeenth
century exhibits the rare workman-
ship characteristic . of early Italian
and French makers. There is also a
porcelain violin, instruments having
been constructed of steel, clay, and
various non-sonorous substances but
none of these experiments have any
musical value.
Many Pianos Included
The harpsichord differs from the
Clavichord inasmuch as the tone is
prod1uced by plucking the string by
quill plectra, forming a very compli-
cated key-mechanism, whereas the
Clavichord consists of wire strings,

hibit 1831 gives a good idea of the
Clavichord while the Harpsicordo
(Italy) is a rare speciment of an early
form of the latter. The Spinet re-
sembles the harpischord in essentials
but has only one string. 'The Spin-
etta, Eighteenth century Italian, is the
best example, probably, of the group
on local ekhibition.
The piano, the modern descendent
of the types mentioned above, may be
considered in three forms, the
"square" (now almost obsolete), the
"upright" (an instrument of fine mu-
sical qualities but whose action is too
complicated to be really effective),
and the "grand." The grand piano,
because of its longer strings and more

very valuable specimen on view is a
"square" piano of English manufac-
ture which was in use about 1790.
Prof. Stanley In Charge
The entire collection has been under
the able stewardship of Prof. A. A.
Stanley, who for more than 20 years
has directed the musical destinies of
the University. The hall is open at
all times when the auditorium is in
use and a few moments spent in re-
viewing the milestones of musical
progress in the world's history will
be amply repaid.
GIRLS ATTENTION! Rainwater
shampoos, marcel waving, manlcur-
ing, face and scalp treatment. Wigs
for runt at Mrs. J. R. Trojanowski's,
1110 S. University, side entrance.
Phone 696-W.-Adv.

stretched over a sound board and responsive action is infinitely superior
made to vibrate by brass tangents at to the other two forms and will, in
the back end of the key levers. Ex- time, become almost universal. A

I

TODAY AND TOMORROW
IoRP iHEM

Marshall Neilan

a

PRESENTS

ANITA STEWART
IN THE BELOVED AMERICAN CLASSIC
In Old Kentucky"

0

BY CHARLES P. DAZEY

A "FIRST NATIONAL ATTRACTION"
The Most Spectacular and Best Known Horse-Race
Story of a Decade

ADIED PEATURE
Chester Conklin

4,

IN

I SHOWScPrices "As Usual"
2:00; 3:30, "WHO AM I I ADULTS 20c,
97:00, 8:30 KIDDIES 10c

GjARRIc K

Nights, 50c to $2.00
Saturday Mat.; Sc tor$1.50

Oliver Morosco presents

I

CHARLOTTE GREENWOOD

In, the Speedy, Breezy
Musieal Comedy

r.

F

Ciacic

3 DAYS STARTING TODAY

"Linger
Longer Letty"

It's so Different Than
"So Long Letty"

r i

D SCHUBERT

Mat. Wed.
Nights
Sat. Mat.

50c to $1.50
50C to $2.50
50c to $2.00

CL skTr Y 4

. .i eV3± EDWARD 6$IMAN

I" .°_r'S4mn y " , t7n-rt'e ! ^ra+.- *a. __; _ ;.'Z'v R......_ .. ,ae ,_ .. _ ..

Richard Walton Tully Presents

NOTE :-"The Mutiny of the Elsinore" is, I believe,
and at the same time wholly plausible. You

the best picture of its kind that I have ever seen. It is virile, red-blooded
are sure to enjoy it if you like tales of adventure and daring.

THE MAJESTIC.

EXTRA ADDED FEATURE

Guy

Bates

Post

TOPICS

YOUNEVER SAWAOTHER
PiCTUPE END LIKE THis

CO MING
NEXT SUNDAY

Majestic Orchestra

In the Century's
Sensation

Shows Today
1:30 - 3:00 - 4:30
7:00 - 8:30

SOMETHING NEW
FROM THE FIRST
\FLASH --EN
OF LAUGHTER
EACH SECONP

"TWIN
BEDS
PEP APPLIED
WITH A POWDER

A

"THE

1

Shows Week Days,
2:00-3:30 L?'

MASQUERADER"

7:00 - 8:30

All Shows
Week Day

Today...
Matinees.

. 35c
.25c

ZOMEDVC)

LLOYD HAMILTON PUFF
("HAM") STARTING
NEXT SUNDAY

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