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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 27, 1920 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, NOVEMI

St
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments x-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor .............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H.. Adams H. WV. Hitchcock
B. P.Ca. E. McManis
C. I ampbel T. WV. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor................ ... .A.Bernstein
Editorials............Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News............................ . P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports..................................... Robert Angell
Women's Editor.................................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph .....................................West Gallogly
Telescope ......................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Byron Darnton H. E. H-owlett
aul G. Weber Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klaver
Almena Barlow Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Elizabeth, Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beata Haslky
George Reindel Hughston MelBain Kathrine Montgomery
Dorothy Monfort Frank H. McPike Gerald P. Overton
Harry B. Grundy J. A. Bacon Edward Lambrecht
Frances Oberholtzer W. W. Ottaway William II. Riley Jr.
RobertE. Adams Paul Watzel Sara Waller
Norman C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising...................................D. P. Joyce
Classifieds ..................................... Robt. 0. Kerr
Publication .....:................................ M. Hath
Accounts ............................ ... E. R. Priehs
Circulation ...................................... V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. XW. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

At times it may seem that the calls for funds to
help sufferers abroad are too frequent, but when,
as is true in most cases, 'ranting these appeals is a
matter of saving life itself, we cannot pass them
by. When the Chinese call comes we will be ready
for it, as we have been for the others.
OPINIONS
In the days of ancient Greece, Plato evolved a
theory that reality is nothing but pure thought.
Some people went so far as to believe him. Some
of them do even now. That shows how powerful
is thought, providing it is put in convincing form.
Public opinon is formed in that manner now. It
is produced by thought, yours and ours, as we talk
things over together. If you and I believe some-
thing intensely, we must talk about it. If we are
right others will believe us, if not they will con-
vince us. Either way some bit of opinon will be
formed. It will be inteliigent opinion if we talk
intelligently.
The war was fought on public opinon. President
Wilson wished to "Make the world safe for de-
mocracy." It mattered not that none is able ex-
actly to name the bounds of democracy. Public
opinon, knowing no accurate definition, was still
able to see the truth behind the concept and to
make it a fighting slogan, one of the greatest of the
ages.
Each of us may help to make this great intangi-
ble power more beneficial and more helpful to hu-
manity by honest thought and earnest expression
of conviction.
REGARDING ART INSTRUCTION.
Recognizing that Michigan very probably has a
large number of students who desire preliminary
and even advanced work in various branches of
art, the College of Architecture holds its courses
open to any student in the University, regardless
of the school or college to which he belongs. The
number of literary students now enrolled is sixty-
eight. The University not only will carry such stu-
dents through the regular drawing and prelimin-
ary courses, but will, when they' have prepared
themselves, open advanced art classes such as por-
trait painting in order to permit a well-rounded
course.
Michigan has as yet no separate art school; but
the instructors and facilities are to a large extent
provided. The better the demand shown for those
classes of art work now offered, the better should
be our chances for the early development of a sep-
arate school of fine arts.
How about it, upperclass adviser? Are you a
friend or just a monthly caller to that list of
frosh ?

I AWonderful Assortmrent of all the
LA TEST BOOKS
BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK
DETROIT UNITED LINES -1111111119111#1111111111119111lI!1#1#
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between -
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limitedtand Express cars leave for
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
LiinIteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and -
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex- -0t eGr
presesat 9:48 a. m. and eweery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5 :55a.m., 7:00 a im - TO EXAMINE OUR BOXES AND'
and every two hours to 9:00 p. in.,-
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only, - BASKETS OF HAND - DIPPED
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.mH
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and HAND - PACKED CHOCOLATES
12:10 p.m.
NOVEMBER WE PACK - WE MAIL
S A T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 ..-
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 V
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 .,=
Miei: Last season's fiats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re- M
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as -a
long and saves you five to ten =-
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617 =
Packard St. Phone 1792.
ELECTRIC COMPANIES. OFFER 709 N. Uuwersity
EMPLOYMENT TO GRADUATES
- m ~ ng in i111111#I 911111111#Ilt##I ##### #I#1#111#U

Night editors for this week are as follows:
Monday night, Hugh Hitchcock ; Tuesday night,
T. W Sargent, Jr.; Wednesday night, B. P. Camp-
bell; Friday night, J. I. Dakin; Saturday night, J.
E. McManis.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night..

Recent inquiries from 'the Western
Electric, Westinghouse Electric, and
General Electric companies indicate a
great demand for graduates from the
electrical engineering and other col-
leges.
Mhe Western Electric company has
sent a man from its Chicago plant
to the University to interview all stu-
dents likely to enter its employ, while
the New York office has offered posi-
tios to electrical engineering gradu-
ates, supplemented with evening cours-
es and postgraduate work at Colum-
bia university.
Particularly
z for Students

TRAWL MAnK RECVUS.PAT 07?..

:
.i
i

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1920.

Storm Shoes

I

KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Completed in 1913, Hill auditorium, which cost
three hundred thousand dollars and will seat an
audience of forty-eight hundred, was given to the
University by Arthur Hill of Saginaw, who was
elected to serve on the Board of Regents from
1901 to 1909. The Regents' rule prohibiting par-
tisan political speeches in the building was upheld
by the Board last year, and is still applicable.
THIS MATTER OF DRIVES
While we are still feeling that satisfied all's-well-
with-the-world sensation which settles down on the
individual who has partaken of a Thanksgiving din-
ner of glorious memory, it seems an excellent op-
portunity to bring out a contrast which only too few
of us have come to realize in its full significance.
Even as we were swallowing our last morsel of
mince meat, supplies were on their way to the starv-
ing populations of China. Tracing their course by
that of a similar shipment which reached its des-
tination Armistice day, we see the vital food un-
loaded from the army transport, placed on six
large barges at Tientsin, transferred twice to
smaller boats as the river shallowed, finally brought
to the head of navigation in forty-eight boats, car-
ried to the town of distribution, and carefully
hoarded until December 1, when the time of neces-
sary distribution will begin.
There are 120,000 people in the province we men-
tion. Of this number, 10,000 of the strongest will
be selected because they alone will be able to sur-
vive on the slight ration until next summer. The
rest must die - 11o,0oo of them. "The huge car-
goes are only a drop in the famine sea," declares
the Chicago Tribune ;and when we realize that the
situation is not confined to one place, but- is spread
throughout a great district containing 45,000,0000
of starving inhabitants, the awfulness of this catas-
trophe which the world's transports laden with the
fruits of a world's generosity can only. in small
part avert, comes with a shock to every person who
possesses an atom of humanity. Fortunately the
world, including the campus of the University of
Michigan, is responding to such appeals as never
before.
It is hard to find much to offset the fearful costs
of the great war, but the conflict had one good re-
sult at least - it made Americans as a people more
generous. Whereas prior to the war, charity "just
happened," now nearly every one of us has a larger
sympathy for other human beings, and giving has
become almost a national habit.
While the struggle brought out in sharp relief
the fact that the United States may be affected by
the welfare of nations in the most remote parts of
the earth, this is hardly the reason that the war
charity drive has survived to serve peace time pur-
poses. That we have taken the other peoples out
of geographies and come to think of them as real
men and women with troubles we ourselves have,
experienced, is nearer the truth.

h Tescope
STANDING
No. of Contribs. Points
Women .........12 36
Men ............20 20
Thousands of our male contributors will be
stupefied to learn that up to the time the Telescope
went to press last night, the girls were actually
leading in the Humor Contest which is to decide
for all time the much-mooted question, "Are Uni-
versity women lacking in a sense of humor?"
Now that you realize, Men of Michigan, that
you are fighting with your backs to the wall in
this supreme conflict, we can only ask you to re-
member the words of that poster which adorns the
Ypsi cemetery, "Wake up, your country needs
you."
Dear Noah:
What do you think of a fellow that would bet
$5 that he could make a date with me ?
Ima Kohed.
We think this conclusively shows that some men
will take awfully de- ?e chances in order to get
money and we think fi her that he should be chas-
tised for this - he c.uht to be made to go out with
a co-ed for nothing.
Now Ain't She Cruel, Men?
The first letter w- picked out of the pile of cor-
respondence today was the following:
"Editor of Telescope:
"Knowing your fondness for the eighth grade
girl, I suggest that the Contest be between them
and the brainy sons of Michigan.
A (sensitive) Co-ed.
"P. S.-Does this chalk up three scores?"
And as we bowed our head under the shame of
this awful accusation we uttered a prayer from the
depths of our editorial heart that some male would
rise to the defense of our maligned sex and answer
this.
What do I hear, men?
Now, Let's Hear from the Girls on the Other Side
You feed to her a wicked line,
And listen to her talk inane,
You drag her then to Blighty's
And drag her home again.
You hold her hand and say "good night"'
As sweetly as you can -
Ain't that a helluva evening
for a great big healthy man.
Famous Closing Lines
"Beautifully rendered," he muttered soulfully as
he gazed at the bucket of lard.
NOAH COUNT.

, 1
'; \ V'
::

For
WINTER
TRAMPING

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115 South Main Street

Mrs, Fox was bragging one day
about the large number of her
"How many cubs do you bring
into the world t oe time ?" she
asked the LIONESS
"Only ONE,"replied the Lioness
- ~but is a LION i "
MURADS COST 20 CENTS,
FOR A BOX OF 10
BUT THEY'RE MURADS
M U R A D S would be lower
priced if we left out all or part of
the 100% Turkish tobaccos of the
purest and best varieties grown-
or if we substituted inferior grades
of Turkish tobacco.
But they wouldn't be MURADS
-they'd only be Foxes!
"Judge for Yourself-!"
We call special attention
to Murad20s in Tin Boxes
Wag" ej te tA Grade Tur IA
AXM y and £Lpton Cgrv~o=_ in Th U644r

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ALL RAINCOATS
ALL SWEATERS -
ALL HATS -
ALL CAPS
s
Saturday Special
$1.50 and $2.00 N-k
_*#*
- r e r SS
Fred W. Gross
309 So. Main
- -nnnnnningunniiinnugniiglngniggn

11

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