100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 27, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WATHERASSOCIATED
RAN-POABYSNWPRESS
TODAY i1)AY AND NIGHT WITRE
VOL. XXXI. N. 46. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENT

*"

4

HIGHER CONCEPT
oF RELATIONS OF
MAN NECSSARYf
STEINER DECLARES THAT IN
THIS IS ONLY REM-.
EDYp
AMERICA MUST GIVEf
AID TO UNFORTUNATES
Music Given by Mrs. William Wheeler,
Earl V. Moore and Mixed
Quartette
"Civilization is diseased and dying and!
the remedy that will save it is not new
governments, not new laws, not Dem-
ocracy, nor socialism," Prof. Edward
Alfred Steiner, of Grinnell college,
said Thursday, speaking at the Uni-
versity Thanksgiving services in Hill
auditorium.
"The true remedy is not any mater-
ial change that men may make in re-
spect to governments or in the relation
existing between them, but only in a
higher concept of mankind in regards
the relation of one man to another,
no matter what the nationality or race
of the person or persons in question
be. There must be a higher stand-
ard of human values.
Recent War Failed
"The recent war has failed to ac-
complish any of the ends in view at
the time it was being waged, instead,
the evils of that time have in many in-
stances been multiplied. A large por-
tion of the world is still seething with
conflicts, many governments can not
hold their own, millions of people are
starving, and the relations of coun-
ties in respect to one another are in
many cases undetermined and suspic-'
ious.
"America at this time is better off
than the rest of the world in all re.
spects, and her duty at this time is to
aid her fellow beings in finding them-
selves. In the latter respect she
should be careful of the attitude she
takes. She should not be a leader,
an overlord, but her position should
be that of a brother. She .must help
pick up her own brothers, the disor-
ganized nations of the world, who
have stumbled and fallen and can'
not find their balance again. Ger-
many sought to lead the world and
give to it what she thought would be
a benefit, but she wished to do it in the
form of a master, not of brother.
America Must Aid
"America must aid civilization, she
must save it from death. Her duty
then is to help Europe get a new
heart."
The speaker of the day was intro-
ducted by Robert F. Grindley '21E, who
was in charge of the services. Pray-
ers and scripture readings were given
by the Rev. J. M. Wells.
Music was furnished by Mrs. Wil-
liam Wheeler, soloist; Earl V. Moore,
organist, and a mixed triple quartette.
TEIM SELECTED FOR
CENTRAL LEAGUE DEBTE
NO DECISION TO BE GIVEN AS
TO OUTCOME OF;
DEBATE
In the final tryouts for the Central
league debate Byron F. Field, '22, W.
H. Frankhauser Jr., '22, L. E. Gru-

baugh, '22, were chosen as speakers on
the negative with E. F. Boxell, '21, al-
ternate. The speakers on the affirm-
ative are 0. A. Brown, '21, L. E.
Rariden, '21, andBP. H. Scott, ' 21,
with Euphemia B. Carnahan, '22, al-
ternate. The Central league debate
will be held sometime during the first
part of January.
When asked why Michigan is not
debating against the Princeton team
that is debating several of the con-+
ference schools, Prof. T. C. True-
blood, head of the oratory department,'
said: "Michigan has received no chal-
lenge from Princeton. However, even'
if we had, it would be impossible for
us to accept the challenge unless the
subject were one of the two chosen
for the conference debates."
By a new ruling which goes into ef-
fect this year there will be no deci-
sion rendered as to the outcome of the'
Central league debate. The same rul-
ing is now up for discussion with re-
gard to the Midwest debate.

select MichiganFaculty rembers
As Speakers For Press

club PICK COMMITTEES
FOR SPDTIIIHT

Speakers at the second annual con-
ventjon of the University Press club
of Michigan, which is meeting here
Dec. 1, 2, and 3, will be mostly faculty
members who are interested in fields
of journalism and the work of the
newspaper, according to a statement
of Prof. John L. Brumm, head of the
department of journalism, and presi-
dent of the oragnization.
"The idea that the organization
hopes to carry out to attain its goal
of mutual helpfulness and co-opera-
tion between the University and the
editors of the state, is that of alter-
nating the presentations of the pro-
grams between the two factions in the
Press club. For instance, this year the
faculty of the University will com-
pose by far the greater majority of the
speakers; while next year the editors
of the state will present their views
and suggestions."
Schermerhorn to Speak
James Schermerhorn, of the Detroit
ONE STATE CANNOT
Fact Brought Out in Discussion Over
Control of Mandatory Com-
mission
UNITED STATES BEST NATION
TO CONTROL ARMENIA-CLAIM
(By AssociatedhPress)
Geneva, Nov. 26.-The difficulty of
any single power or influence domin-
ating the league of nations was dem-
onstrated tonight when the council of
that body, in spite of determined pro-
tests and vigorous remonstrances de-
cided finally to give the control in the
permanent mandates commission to
non-mandatory powers and four of the
mandatory states. Today's action was
a confirmation of the decision taken
at the Brussels conference.
United States Has Influence
That the United States would be the
best nation to accept the mandate for
Armenia is the opinion of Lord Goth-
ard Cecil who is acting one of South
Africa's delegates to the league as-
sembly.
The United States, he said, probably
would have more influence with the
Turkish national leader, Mustan Ke-
mal, than any other nation.
Lord Roberts said that $20,000,000
would supply the necessary military
assistance to put Armenia on her feet.
The money would be regarded as a
loan to the Armenian states which
would be repaid if the Armenian eco-
nomic situation were re-established.
Would Use Volunteers
While refusing to name the number
of troops necessary, Lord dRoberts
stated it would be quite easy to ob-
tain a volunteer force composed of
Armenians and the nationals of neigh-
boring states.
"The Armenia question," he explain-
ed, "resolves itself largely into wheth-
er there is any government for people
in the world caring enough about Ar-
menia to furnish the necessary money
for the work.
After declaring that the work of the
assembly had been extraordinarily
successful, Lord Roberts continued,
"No one foresaw that the assembly
would become a corporate body with
real life in it. And regards itself and
rightly so, as the supreme interna-
tional authority so far as such author-
ity can exist."
DR. BARTELL WILL
ADDRESS CHEMISTS

Dr. F. E. Bartell of the chemistry
department is to be the speaker at
the meeting of the University of Mich-
igan section of the American Chemi-
cal society at 4:15 o'clock Tuesday,
Nov. 30, in room 151 of the chemistry
building. His subject is "Anomalous
Osmose and Its Relation to the Be-
havior of Certain Colloid Systems."
The paper will deal with the swell-
ing of gels and with processes con-
cerned with the functions of living
tissues. The phenomenon of osmose
is closely related to the process of
growth of both animal and vegetable
organisms. This subject is one of spe-
cial interest to the members of the
department of biology as well as
chemistry.

Times, will informally open the con-
vention at a smoker to be held Wed-
nesday evening at the Union. Scher-
merhorn has talked a number of
times at the University and is known
throughout the state as a journalist
and speaker.
The opening address of the conven-
tion will be given Thursday morning
by President Marion L. Burton. It is
expected by those who arranged the
program that a large number of edi-
tors who have not yet had the oppor-
tunity of hearing President Burton
will attend.
After the address the general busi-
ness session of the organization will
be held, at which time a constitution,
which has been drawn up by Professor
Brumm and Harley Johnson, manag-
ing editor of the Ann Arbor Times-
News, will be presented for adop-
tion.
Editors to See Campus
The afternoon of the day will be
given over to two addresses, one by
Prof. Fred N. Scott, head of the rhet-
oric department, who is speaking on
"Training for Journalism," and the
other by Prof. David Friday, of the
economics department, talking on the
subject of "The New' Economic Day."
The remainder of the afternoon will
be spent in a tour of inspection about
the campus, and in the evening the
visitors will attend a complementary
concert in Hill auditorium.
Friday morning, Dec. 3, Prof. E. R.
Sunderland, of the law school, will
speak on "The Newspaper and the
Courts," Dr. Alfred H. Lloyd, dean of
the Graduate school, will give an ad-
dress on "Newspaper Conscience," and
Prof. Jesse Reeves, of the political
science department, will talk on "The
Political Editorial."
In the afternoon Mortimer E. Coo-
ley, dean of the College of Engineer-
ing and Architecture, speaks with his
subject as "The University and In-
dustry," and Dr. W. W. Bishop, Uni-
versity librarian, lectures on "Libra-
ry Service to Newspapers."
Banquet Friday Night
Friday evening there will be a com-
nlementary banquet at the Union,
where Prof. William Wheeler, of the
University School of Music, will sing,
and Prof. R. K. Immel, of the depart-
ment of public speaking, will give a
few readings. The last address of the
convention will be given at the ban-
quet by Rev. Lloyd Douglas, pastor of
the Congregational church, who has
chosen as his subject, "Newspaper
Humor and Otherwise." Douglas was
connected with newspaper work be-
fore he entered the ministry.
Attention is again called by Pro-
fessor Brumm to the fact that all stu-
dents of the University are welcome
at any of the open meetings and ad-
dresses during the convention. He
further expressed his desire to see the
students take an interest in the
speeches that will be given during the
meeting and attend them in represen-
tative numbers. .
SEC. POST TO SPEK
BEFORE LIBERAL CLUB
ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF LABOR
AND AUTHOR OF NOTE;
HERE SUNDAY
Word has just been received that
Louis Freeland Post, assistant secre-
tary of labor of the United States, has
accepted an invitation of the Michigan
Students' Liberal club, to speak here
tomorrow night at 8 o'clock in Natur-

al Science audtiorium on "The Future
of Labor."
Mr. Post has been assistant secre-
tary of labor since 1913. Before that
time he was editor of the Public, Chi-
cago, which he founded, together with
Alice Thacher Post, 1898. Through-
out his entire life Mr. Post has been a
strong advocate of single tax and eco-
nomic reforms, besides having edited
many prominent labor publications.
Among the most prominent books of
Mr. Post are: "The George-Hewitt
Campaign, 1887," "Ethics of Demo-
cracy," "Ethical Principles of Mar-
riage and Divorce," "Social Service,"
"Land Value Taxation," and his latest
work, "The War and What It Means to
Us."

I lull U lU I LIUKI I

Peirce McLouth, '21, General
man, Announces List of
Names

Chair-

DATE SET TUESDAY, DEC. 7,
ADMISSION TO BE 50 CENTS
Committees for the Spotlight vaude-
ville to be given Tuesday, Dec. 7,-were
announced yesterday by Peirce Mc-
Louth, '21, general chairman, as fol-
lows:
Steward Smith, '21E, stage manag-
er; Mark B. Covell, '21E, advertising
manager; William W. Michaels, '22,
chairman ticket sales.
Ticket committee: P. W. Schnor-
bach, '21E; Guy Moulthrop, '22; Ned
Ives, '22; Allan Sunderland, '22. Pro-
gram committee: M. S. Geiger, '22;
Bryan Warman, '23; Byron Darnton,
'23; J. M. Stedman, '21. Stage com-
mittee: Durban Longnecker, '21E;
Clark Boothby, '22E; James Patton,
'23E; John Sutton, '23; Lee Atwood,
'23.
"Spotlight will be short and snappy
this year," said McLouth yesterday,
"and the acts, which were all chosen
the first of the week, were selected
with this aim-in view."
Tickets will go on sale the be-
ginning of next week, and will be 50
cents, the same as last year.
WASHIN6TON DEDICATES
NEW STADIUM TODAY.

MOST

COMPLETE STAND
OF MISSISSIPPI
RIVER

{

WEST

Seattle, Nov. 27. - Homecoming1
crowds for the Dartmouth-Washing-
ton game at Seattle today will dedi-
cate the new Washington university
stadium which is believed to be the,
best and most modern structure of its
kind west of the Mississippi river.
This great project was first plan-
ned about a year ago and seats to a
value of $210,000 were sold in an in-
tensive state-wide financial campaign
conducted by students with the as-
sistance of business men. A short
time later the student body added,
$100,000 to this sum out of personal;
subscriptions, which brings the total
fund within a few thousand dollars
of the estimated cost.
The construction of the Washing-
ton stadium has established a new
speed record for engineering work of
this kind. The Yale bowl which has
twice the seating capacity took four
years to build, whereas the Wash-
ington stadium was completed six
months after ground was broken for
its construction.
The field is 256 feet wide and 487
feet long, thus affording ample space
for the football gridiron. The sta-
dium proper comprises 32 sections,
seating in all more than 30,000 peo-
ple.
PRINTERS' DELAY HOLDS
UP STUDENTS' DIRECTORY
Due to an unavoidable delay at the
printers, the Students' Directory will
not be out today as formerly planned,
but will be sold on the campus during
the early part of next week. The
printing and folding is practically
completed at the present time, but the
binding of the books has not yet been
started.
READING CLASSES WILL GIVE
SHAKESPEREAN PERFORMANCE
The University classes in Shake-
sperean reading, under the direction
of Professors Trueblood - and Hollis-
ter, of the oratory department, will
give a complimentary performance of
Shakespeare's "Comedy of Errors" at
8 o'clock next Tuesday evening, in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Every-
body will be welcome.

GOETZPLACEDON
POST BIG 10 TEAM
Chicago, Nov. 26.-Among the first
of the All-Conference elevens to be
picked is the choice of the Chicago
Evening Post, carrying the list of men
chosen for a first and second eleven,
together with MacLean's summary of
outstanding men for the various
berths.1
Michigan placed two men on the
Post's mythical elevens. Goetz was
placed at tackle on the first eleven and
Steketee at half on the second team.j
Below are listed the men placed:
First 11 Position Second 11
Crangle, Ill.....F.B......Sundt, Wis.
Stinchcomb, O... L.H... Williams, Ind.
Elliott, Wis......R.H... Steketee, Mich.
A. Devine, Ia.....Q.B..B. Fletcher, Ill.
Carney, Ill. .....L.E..Eckberg, Minn.
Belding, Ia......R.E.....Hanny, Ind.
Goetz, Mich......R.T......Huffman, 0.
Scott, Wis.....L.T...Penfield, North.
Risley, Ind.......R.G........Mohr, Ill.k
McGuire, Chi.....L.G.......Taylor, 0.c
Depler, Ill. ....... C...... Bunge, Wis.s
PREP TEAMS PLAY
SEM I-FINUALS TODAYI
Winner to Meet Muskegon Eleven for1
Championship of
Statet
EACH TEAM BEEN DEFEATED t
ONCE, BUT HAS GOOD RECORD
Lansing and Detroit Northwestern,a
the two prep schools of Michiganc
which boast the strongest teams witha
the exception of Muskegon, will clasht
at 2 o'clock today on Ferry field in aa
game which will determine which elev-I
en will go up against Muskegon fort
the state championship.
Both teams come to Ann Arbor with5
a record including one defeat, but inI
Saturday's contest, they are expectedt
to show the form which has brought8
them to the fore in Michigan schol-
astic football. Saginaw Eastern hasg
taken the measure of Detroit North-t
western, and Lansing fell before Sag-r
inaw Arthur Hill.
Muskegon Undefeatedv
By defeating Grand Rapids Centralr
last Saturday, Muskegon completede
her light schedule without a blemishx
and now stands as the only undefeat-v
ed team in the lower peninsula withr
some claim to the title. Menominee,t
in the upper peninsula, having dis-
banded her eleven, there is no aggre-
gation in that region to play for theI
state championship against Muskegone
or the winner of Saturday's bout.
A bitter fight is expected when theI
Detroit and Lansing elevens meet, and
some exceptional high school footballr
is expected to be displayed. Bothr
teams, fighting for a chance at thet
state title, will exhibit the best brand
of gridiron knowledge of which they
are capable.
Large Crowd ExpectedI
A large number of students is ex-
pected to witness the encounter on ther
big Varsity field this afternoon, ast
Michigan students from the respective
cities will turn out en masse to sup-
port their former schools. An admis-
sion of 75 cents is being charged tot
defray the expenses of bringing thef
rival elevens here.I
Derril Pratt, reserve coach, will act
as referee, E. J. Mather, freshman
mentor, has been chosen to serve ast
umpire, and Director Olds of Ann Ar-

bor athletics will be the head lines-
man.
The winner of this contest will en-
gage with Muskegon to decide the
state high school championship. In
the event of a Lansing victory the
game will be delayed two weeks, as
the Capital team meets Hyde Park
next Saturday.
CONGRESS MUST ACT QUICKLY
ON IMMIGRATION BILLS
Washington, Nov. 26.-Congress at
the coming session is unable to draft
legislation to restrict immigration.
It probably will be urged by the
house immigration committee to bar
all aliens from the United States tem-
porarily, Representative Johnson of
Washington, chairman of the com-
mittee, said today. Expiration on
March 4 of the passport law makes it
imperative that action be taken to
prevent the entry of undesirable im-
migrants after that time.

BUDGET ESTIMATE
MUST GO BEFORE
NEXT LEISLATUR
PRESIDENT BURTON MAKES CON.
VINCING APPEAL IN
LANSING
FIGHT WILL COME IN
HOUSE, NOT SENATE
Total Figure Just Enough to Cover
Absolute Needs and
Expenses
(Special to The Daily)
Lansing, Nov. 26.-With the hear-
ing of - the University of Michigan
budget estimate, totaling $8,690,000,
completed before the budget commis-
sion late Friday afternoon in the
capitol building, there yet remains the
necessity of President Marion L. Bur-
ton placing before the next session
of the legislature the same convinc-
ing arguments and explanations that
he used so effectively today.
That President Burton may be suc-
cessful in presenting the University's
request before the members of the
1920 legislature, and may succeed in
obtaining the University's appropria-
tion, is evidenced by a statement made
this afternoon by O. B. Fuller, andi-
tor general.
Real Fight in House
"Dr. Burton," Mr. Fuller declared,
at the close of the .session, "if you
can present the needs of the Univer-
sity as forcefully to the legislature
as you have to us it is an even bet
that you will get every item of the
appropriation you ask." From this it
is also evident that President Bur-
ton's real fight will have to be made
in the house of representatives next
year. If the appropriation passes the
house it is conceded that there is lit-
tle chance of its failing before the
senate.
James Green, assistant attorney
general, stated that he believed the
tax payers of Michigan were not so
much concerned as to the amount of
the various state expenditures, as they
were in whether the money was cor-
rectly utilized. Budget Commission-
er Foote told those present that the
budget for each state department.
would be prepared in the light of the
needs of each, letting the amounts
total what they may.
When the estimates for the Univer-
sity were first prepared President
Burton told the commission they total-
ed to the staggering sum of $19,000,-
000. This amount was slashed item
by item, he said, until the budget as
it now stands includes only the actual
necessities of the University and does
not treat upon the wants or desires of
the numerous departments heads.
Figure Not Too High
President Burton stated that the
$8,690,000 asked for was not a figure
placed high enough so that if cut the
University would still have what it......
needed from the state. Such a budget,
the President said he could not pre-
pare, and whether this budget was
passed or not, he declared he felt that
he had done all he could in furthering
the advancement of the University in
educational lines. The Regents and a
large group of Michigan's profession-
al and business men attended the
hearing and listened with marked at-
tention to the President's arguments.
Approached at the close of the after-

noon session President Burton sim-
ply said, "I think we have had a very
satisfactory meeting." Accompanied
by State Senator Charles Sink, Rep-
resentative 3. B. Manwaring, Regent
Julius Beal, and Shirley Smith, sec-
retary of the University, President
Burton drove from Lansing to Ann
Arbor this, evening.
Work on Hospital Now Progressing
Labor and materials for the con-
struction of the new hospital are plen-
tiful. Contrary to conditions last sum-
mer, supplies for months in advance
are on hand, and 200 men are at
work on the building.

I-
I

FRATERNITIES NOTICE
Fraternities and sororities are
requested to send a representa-
tive to a meeting to be held at
5 o'clock Monday in the Assem-
bly room at Lane hall.

I

Student council picture will be
taken at 12 o'clock Monday, at E
Spedding's studio.

.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan