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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER O THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer.
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
"TheAsiciated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ublicatin of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
lited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
.s matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 96; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ure not- necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
;h, and notices of events will be pub ised in The Daily at the
retion of the Editor, i left at or mailed to The Daily office.
signed communications will receive no consideration. No man-
rpt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ised in 'the communications.
"what's*Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
the evening'preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE o. BROPHY JR
s Editor...............Chesser M. Campbell
It Editors-
T. E . Adams . H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood . . en sten
flay Fditor...................JA enti
orias. ........Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
stat News................ -.. .E. P. -ovejoy Jr
rts ...........................Robert Angell
te's Editor.,.. .................. ,..Mary D. Lane
grap. ...........-...... .......... West Gallogly
scope ..................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
hne wad'o Frances Oberholtzer L. Armstrong Kern
G, Weber Robert E. Adams Hughston McBain
ena Barlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
Vieth Vickery Byron Darnton. Gerald P. Overton
E. ┬▒Clark Thomas 4. Dewey Edward Lambrecht
urge Rindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. RileyJr
othy.Monfor Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waler
ry B. Grundy
BTSNES9 STAFF
Telephone 96A
SINESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR
ertising..........D. P. Joyce
sfeds -:..................... ........Rot. O. Kerr
licatio.................... ............... M. Reats
ounts .........................E. R Priehs
ulation..................................V. F Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
G. Gower F. A. "Cross R. C. Stearies
Gnund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos.L. Rice
ter w. Millard M. M. Moutle D. G. Slawson
Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterwort,
The night editors for the week will be as follows:
inday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Tuesday night,
ornton Sargent; Wednesday night, Brewster
l pbell; Thursday night, Thomas Adams; Fri-
night, Jack Dakin; Saturday night, Renaud
erwood.
Persons wishing to secure information concerningnews for any
to of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
it news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18,' 4192.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
[he sum of $8,690,000, asked as an appropria-
t for the University budget, is to, be sought en-
ly from the legislature of 1921, while approxi-
tely five millions will be asked from the legisa-
e of 1923, and another five millions from the
islature of 1925. This makes a total appropria-
i program for the three sessions of nearly $9,-
),ooo, correcting an impression expressed in this
umn, that the original $8,69;ooo constituted the
ole sum.
TOUCHDOWN, UNION!
fight hundred and thirty-seven life members -
htly more than a third of the coveted twenty-
hundred - were secured for the Union on the
t day of the drive, and all indications were Wed-
day that another third, if not more, would be
led to the figures before tallying time. Today,'
h our figurative goal-line only a few hundred
ay, Michigain has a chance to put over its big-
t touchdown - the completion of the Union.
It is needless to repeat that the Union is our
atest student asset; that its entire completion is
natter of months if the men of the University
>ve their willingness to subscribe the running-
>enses of the organization through taking out
memberships; and that failure to go over the
L set for this year may spell another delay in

shing the building. Nor is it necessary to tell
Iichigan man how worth-while the organization
to himself. This is the chance for every non-
mber to identify himself }definitely and perma-
itly with the greatest expression of Michigan
lowship and activity - the Union.
NEEDED: REAL CRITICISM
3ecause of the confusion which links criticism
h fault finding in the popular mind, the power-
constructive force which President Burton re-
itly declared "serves.as a splendid social check,
L spur to efficiency, and is one of the finest things
the world," often lies dormant and idle. The
ic is generally looked on as a knocker, and too
en that is all he is. Even if sincere he is likely
be met with antagonism because of the natural
unwarranted feeling on the part of most of us
t any one trying to show us our errors is actu-
d by a desire to discount our ability.
But if real criticism, is the power that President
rton has said it is we should not let false ideas
der- us from enlisting it for the promotion of
:higan's welfare and progress. The true critic.
always searching for means of improving ex-
rg conditions, is ready to carry out his plans
er he has become satisfied of their merit and
tification, and is at all times guided by a con-
ictive spirit of tolerance that causes him to time,
actions so that they will do the most good with.

1 A A ir!VdAl..4 1
If every student here were a critic of the right
sort Michigan could not help but acquire new great-
ness.
FUNDS FOR A CAMPUS THEATER
For many years past an important focus of Mich-
igan's desire for. an even greater t&.iversity has
been centered upon the building of a campus thea-
ter. With increasing force the inadequacy of Mich-
igan's playhouse facilities for dramatic study has
hampered the progress of our University as an in-
tellectual and cultural center ; but money is needed
for the construction of such, an "edifice, and the
purse strings of the state and the alumni will be
taxed to the utmost in order to complete the plans
which are under way at the present time.
The balance from the 1919 Junior hop was the
first fund laid aside as a foundation for a campus
theater. This year, as always, there will be bal-
ances left over from Spotlights, from plays, from
operas ; and there will remain a surplus in the cof-
fers of clubs, organizations, and classes. This-
money can be put to no better use than donation to
the fund originated last year for the purpose of
gaining a campus theater for Michigan.

SLsJ4! V I AltL LI

GR H AM

A Wonderful Assortment of all the
LATEST BOOKS,

C AGHNAAM
BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

s

r

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann- Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
imited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at fT05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,,
8:10 a. i., and hourlyto x: 10 p. n.
Umiriteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. 'm. Ex.
pressesat 9:48 a. m. and e-.ory two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
.owls to Detroit- : 55a.m., 7:00 a.m
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.
also 11:00 p. mn. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.n., and 1:15 am
cocals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

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FROM WITHIN
What a contrast there is between the college
viewed from the outside and from within ! The
layman's point of view is that the college is more
or less of an intellectual center, while, as a matter
of act, within the college community nearly every-
thing smacking of intellectuality - cr 'highbrow
stuff', as it is more often termed - is most vigor-
ously resisted by the great majority.
As an instance of this compare the crowds which
every night pack the motion picture houses. with
the proportionately- small audience that turns out
to hear the average lecturer or musical artist who
makes an occasional local appearance. This dem-
onstrates clearly enough 'in what 'direction the
taste of the maiority lies. Iigh class entertain-
mept and education alike seem unfortunately to
constitute the same sour dose which too often has
either to be forced down the victim's throat or re-
main untaken.
This, of cotfrse, is not the outsider's conception
of aaffirs. His idea is quite the opposite, and he
is theoretically correct, for, hard sledding as it may
be, the university should impart some degree of cul-,
ture to its struggling patients. By the time a stu-
.dent has graduated, his tastes should be at least a
little higher than those of a grocery store clerk of
an office boy.
Practically too, the layman's view should be'
well grounded. To deny the existence of value in
motion pictures, musical comedies, and similar di-
vertisements would be absurd, but they should not
be indulged in exclusively or to such an extent that
they become an only source of pleasure. An aes-
thetic sense, no matter how small, should be pres-
ent in every individual Who has enough intelli-
gence to be able to pass through a college course.
This sense, if not inherent, can be acquired. but
only through taking advantage of all or most of the
opportunities offered for the appreciation of good
books, good pictures, good uiusid, and good lec-
tures. There is a greater opportunity for this par-
ticipation in a college community than perhaps in
any other place. To ignore it is to deny oneself
some of the greatest advantages of a university ed-
ucation.
Nothing but the most urgent classwork should
interfere with your presence at the Michigan Cen-
tral depot bon voyage this afternoon.
t he .Telescope
Gone, but not forgotten, is that sterling genius,
Jay Whitleaf Greenier, whose stirring poems on
their first appearance in the Telescope awakened
the campus to a new appreciation of the finer things
of life. The following poem, "It's a Wise Horse
That Nose Its Own Fodder," we think is charac-
teristic of him.' The first installment runs:

NOVEMBER
M T W T F S
1, 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30
Men : Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new -trimmingsi
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

i

DISMAY!
In the above picture the' art st
has endeavored to .depict a dis-
mayed householder whose home
is being consumed by fire before,
his eyes. Does the Man really
look dismayed or is he clapping,
his hands? We can't tell, our-'
selves! But we are sure that the
very best earthly consolation for
a loss by fire is one of our time-
tried afid fire-tested Insurance pol-
icies. We are the largest writersI
of Fire Insurance in the 'city and.
you will find us good people to
know.
BUTLER.
INSURANCE
Phone 401 M
National Bank Burlding
JOSEPH PEILEN, SOLICITOR

STUDIO
'WRECITAL
TO BE GIVEN BY
ALMA He NORSWORTHY
Teacher of Expression
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH
AT 3:00 P. X.
PROGRAM
I
(a) "Little Boy Blue"....
...........:Eugene Field
(b) "Bugle Song"........
... Alfred Tennyson
(c) "In School Days"......
.....Greenleaf Whittier
(d) "Lead, Kindly Light":.
........Cardinal Newman
II
"The Going of the White Swan".
... Sir Gilbert Parke
III
"Muleykeh"...Robert Browning
IV
"Mansie Wauch's First and Last.
Play"......D. M. Moir
A cordial l tatIon Is extended
to all those interested
1113 CO LLEG STREET

Extension Department Heads Confr
J. E. Bullock, extension and public-
ity director for the New York State
college of forestryaat Syracuse, con-
ferred here yesterday with William D.
Henderson, director of the University
3xtension service.
The Kempt Music Studios -Piano,
>rgan, and Voice Instruction. Es-
,ahlished 1880. 312 1 Division St
"hone 212-J.-Adv.

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says letty lutterfly

-

THANKSGIVING

FESTIVITIES

0

ARE NOT COMPLETE
WITHOUT FLOWERS

In Turkey, in a valley,
A maiden meet McGrail,
And when she asked for an.
He saw her through the

escort
veil.

A BASKET OF FLOWERS

He took the pretty maiden,
Whose ways were debonair,
A ridin' in a taxicab -
The price he paid was fair.

A CORSAGE

He took her to the vaudeville
And bought a reserved seat,
And when the juggler act came on,
He hollered out, "Some feet."
He bought a wedding uniform -
(It surely cost a bit),
And when he tried the new suit on
He nearly had a fit.
Dear Noah:
In view of the decreasing numbers who yearly
take up teaching as a profession, where, I ask you,
will we find the teachers of the future?
Ed Ukator.
You'll find many of them over in Ypsi on the
parlor sofa after 8 o'clock on week end nights.
Famous Closing Lines
"I spotted you right away," laughed the waiter
as he spilled the soup on the patron.
NOAH COUNT.

A SPECIAL PLANT
ARRANGEMENT

9

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