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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND MODERATE
TEMPERATURE TODAY

rAlt ian

:4I ttx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT IYIR
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 39ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1920. PRICE FIVE CE]

GIANT SEND-.IOrF
UNDERGRADUATES TO MEET AT1
12:45 BEFORE HILL
AUDITORIUM
FATE OF FAMOUS JUG
HINGES ON VICTORY

Yostmen Arrive in Minneapolis
Time for Friday
Practice

In

* "And the II' old jug wouldn't do
any harm."
Minnesota last year took away from
Michigan the jug that typifies the'
ancient rivalry between the two uni-
versities. That jug means victory,
and the Student council in appointing
a committee to see that a suitable
representation of students is present
when the team leaves today for Min-
neapolis signified that the student
body is behind the team.
Band Will Be There
At 12:45 o'clock today the under-
graduates will meet in front of Hill
auditorium, where A. 0. Cuthbert,
'TIE, will lead the cheers. The band
will meet at the Engineering arch at
the same time and' will march over
to the auditorium, where with the
crowd it will escort the team to the
station. Members of the Varsity are
to be at the Union at 12:30' o'clock
and will be taken to the train in
autos.
Arrive at 9:55
Leaving.Ann Arbor on the Michigan
Central at 1:23 o'clock the team will
arrive in Minneapolis at 9:55 o'clock
Friday morning, where practice will
be held Friday afternoon.
The game Saturday is. the last of
the season. Minnesota and Michigan
have fought in former years for the
privilege of having on the shelves of
their respective gymnasiums that jug
which goes to the victor after every
contest on the gridiron.
"And the 111' old jug wouldn't do
any harm!"
HOCKY USIMIN NOT
MAD VASIT SORTS

harristers Take
13 New Members
With ceremonies that were solemn
and rigorous, Barristers, senior hon-
orary law society, initiated 13 men'
yesterday afternoon in the practice
court room of the Law building.
The neophytes were Ernest Zeigler,
Harry Rudine, B. B. Loring, G. D.
Clapperton, Lee Joslyn, Jr., George
Bouchard, Turner Rudesill, M. B.
Conklin, .G. B. Wolfe, E. J. Richards,
W. R. Tomkin, A. J. Cohn, and Prof.
E. R. Sunderland. Willis Blakeslee,
'21L, was in charge of the iitiation,
assisted by Arthur Zeigler, '2114.
After the initiation the men went
to the Union where a banquet was
given in honor of the new members.
CARGE AEI
HAYTI__KILLINGS
Former Marine Corporal Said to Have
Executed Three
Prisoners
AFFAIR TOOK PLACE FOLLOW.
ING ATTACK BY NIGHT
(By Associated Press) -
Port Au Prince, Hayti, Nov. 17,-
A direct charge that Freeman Lang,
formerly a corporal in the marine
corps and a lieutenant in Gendarmine,
killed three Haytian prisoners at Hin-
zat, was made today before the court
of inquiry which is investigating the
activities of American marines in'
the administration . of Hayti, by
Adolph Bourgot, a native.
Bourgot, who at the time was act-
ing as corporal, testified that he wit-
nessed the execution which occurred
immediately after a night attack. He
said, "During the attack, which lasted
one-half an hour, the three Haytians
were in prison. When the attack end-
ed Lang ordered them out, shooting
them in the back." The witness said
that he was in the prison yard with
other natives seeking safety.
Lieutenant Colonel Hooper describ-
ed the January attack of Port au
Prince, spying that 66 persons had
been killed. He declared the attack
was made in order to bolster up the
bandit cause.

Faculty

Members Decide Not
Accept Challenge of
Society

to

PROF. FRIDAY CLAIMS SUBJECT
IS NOT CLEARLY DEFINED,
Prof. David Friday of the Econom-
ics department, in answering the
challenge issued by the Intercol-
legiate Socialist society to the faculty?
to debate "Socialism," says that such!
a debate would be impossible because
few people could agree on what So-
cialism really is. An attempt to de-
bate this subject has-been made many
times, but it has always been found
that Socialism is too general and in-
definite a subject for debating, he
says. The public and especially col-
lege students should understand So-
cialism and Socialistic movements
much more than they do, says Pro-
fessor Friday.
Are Not Radicals
Mr. Isador Lubin, also of the Eco-
nomics department, and a member of
the Intercollegiate Socialist society,
says, "It should be clearly understood
that the Intercol'egiate Socialist so-
ciety does not uphold radical Social-
ism. Its object is to educate the gen-
eral public and especially college stu-
'ents to a true understanding of So-
cialism,"
Sugest Debates
Faculty members seem of the opin-
ion that there would be little inter-
est in any debate of a Socialistic na-
ture at the present time. The beat
time. they say. for such a discussion
would be early in 1921. At that timeJ
members of the faculty would be in-
terested in taking up a debate on
some subject such as "Government
Owrership of Industries," or "Gov-
ernment Control of the Railroads.",
Whether the Intercollegiate Socialist,
society would care to take part in
such a debate is not known.1
Several public lectures on social-
istic questions were held here last
winter and both the faculty and stu-
dents showed great interest in them.
M ATINFE MU TCA L.F
PROGRAM PLEASES;

SOCIALIST DEBATES
ARE, NOT FAVORED

Tickets On Sale
Tickets for the Detroit alumni
smoker to be: held on the afternoon
of the Minnesota game will go on sale
today at the Union and at the cash,-
ier's desk in The Daily office. It is
expected that the smoker, which will
be held in the auditorium of the Elks'
temple in Detroit, will be attended by
several hundred students, as well as
the alumni.
Besides getting the results of the
Minnesota game play by play, other
attractions will be offered. Music is
to be furnished by the University
quartet and Ike Fischer's Jazz orches-I
tra, and refreshments are to be serv-
ed without extra cost during the after-
noon. The price of the tickets is $1.

'ENSIAN ART NOTICE f
Men and women interested in,
entering into competitive art
work for the 1921 Michiganen-
sian are requested to call Lee
Boyd. phone 1166.

I

CRAMER, '23, HEADS
LIST OF SOLICITC
Individual Leader's Team Also
Heading Entire
Field

Alumni Smoker

UNION MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 950'
NEARER GOAL1 SHOULDREA[LIZE
OBJECTIVE WITH TODA'S EFFOR'

SEE THE VARSITY OFF
The football send-off today is te last chance for the Michigan stu-
dent body to show its appreciation of the unceasing efforts put forth by
the team. this fall. The Wolverine warriors are off to battle Minnesota
in the season's final contest and the least we who cannot accompany
them can do is to give them a farewell which will leave them no
room to doubt the wholehearted support of the -students.
The band will lead the procession which will start at 12:45 o'clock
from the steps of Hill auditorium. The line of march will be down State
street to the Michigan Central station whence the team leaves dt 1:23
o'clock.

MUST SECURE 723 P
BRING TOTAL TO I
AMOUNT

With the first two days
Union life membership

of

gone, and only one more day
which to solicit subscriptions,
workers are still more than 700 at
of the goal of 2,500.
Totals for yesterday reached
1,787 mark, exactly 950 new memt
ships being obtained during the d
The final figure Tuesday night 1
837.
Hardest Work Ahead
"Tomorrow must see greater act
ity than either of the past two day
declared Maynard Newton, '22, g

NEFOS OF FERRY FIELD
NOW' BEING SURVEYED

HOP 11U LDR ILL B
CHOSEN FROM 1-LITS

PROF. GRAM BELIEVES
SHOULD START IN
SPRING

WORK

STUDENT COUNCIL ADOPTSr
OF ROTATING CHAIR-
MANSHIP

,PLAN

gwimming an4 hickey were denied
recognition as Varsity sports by the
exo:utive committee of the Board inl
Control of Student Athletics at a
meeting oeld Wednesday night.
The committee gave as its reason
for not granting swimming recogni-
tion at this time that there is no
swimming pool under the control of
the University at present. However,
as soon as the Union is completed it
will be a matter of but a slfort time
before the water sport will be given
Varsity recognition.
Hockey failed to receive recognition
by the committee largely because of
the lack of Conference competition.
The Michigan team would have to
seek games entirely in other quar-
ters, which is against the policy of
the Athletic association at present.
According to Mr. Bartleme, there is
little likelihood of hockey receiving
recognition in the next few years.
These two sports will be continued
informally as last year. For this pur-
pose the committee voted that $750
be granted to swimming and hockey
each for this season. This s-.m is to
be spent under the guidance of Di-
rector of Intramural Athletics Mitch-
ell. The committee also decided that
Michigan would enter no team in Con-
ference swimming meets for the pres-
ent.
FRESHMEN HAVE CHANCE TO GO
THROUGH LIBRARY WORKROOMS
Literary and. engineering fresh-
men desiring to visit the stacks and
workrooms of the Library will be
permitted to do so from 7 to 9 o'clock
tomorrow night by going to the office
in the second floor delivery corridor.
This is to show the arrangement and
workings of the Library following
talks to the freshmen on this subject

CHINESE STUDENTS TO
AID ART IVE SFFEER
Co-operating with the Michigan
Alumni association in Shanghai,
China, members of the Chinese Stu-
dents' club will proceed Monday, Nov.
22, with plans for the raising of $15,-1
000 to aid in the relief of the 80,000
people who are suffering from famine
in China.
According to F. C. Liu, '21L, who is
chairman of the committee in charge,
China this year has been in the throes
of a great drought which has effected
an area of approximately 100,000
square miles, including five provinc-
es. The inhabitants of these dis-
(Continued on Page Eght)

Mrs. Perey Potter, a well known
local favorite. opened the program of
the Matinee Musicale given at the
regular- meeting of the society Wed-
nesday afternoon in the Michigan Un-
ion Assembly hall.
*As shown by her singing of "Batti
Patti" from Mozart's "Don Giovanni,"
Mrs. Potter possesses a voice of high
sweet quality and has that faculty of
putting herself into her work which
can but result in a pleasant perform-
ince.
Mrs. Parker Heath played "Andante"
from Hadyn's "Surprise Symphony,"
and a Chopin waltz which were well
received.
Closing the program with an ad-
dress on "The Lure of Little Master-
pieces for Unaccompanied Chorus,"
Mr. Frederick Alexander explained"
several phases of his work with young
people in this unique type of chorus.

Under the direction of the Board
in Control of Athletics a systematic
survey of the future needs of Ferry
field began Monday, according to
Prof. L. M. Gram, faculty member of
the board.
"This is the first step in compre-
hensive extension plans covering a
period of years, which will include a
stadium, tennis courts, hockey rinks
and any other improvement which the
investigation may show to be neces-
sary. Plans which will be studied and
discussed during the winter months.
are now being prepared for a com-
plete cement stadium. The necessity
of having more seats was clearly dem-
onstrated in the unprecedented con-
gestion this fall. The first action
will be to make a blue-print of all
arrangements now completed and
then plot the future projects as they
are decided upon."
It is Professor Gram's opinion
that work should be started this
spring if possible, although the in-
crease in cost of building materials-
makes a new stand a much larger
proposition than the old one. The
concrete bleachers which we now
have, cost approximately $6 a seat.
while one built today would be near-
ly twice that much. Another difficulty
pointed out by Professor Gram was
that work on the ends would all be
of a special nature due to the curved
design necessary.
SOPHOMORE LIT OFFICERS
DISCUSS PLANS FOR YEAR
Class Can Hold no Social Functions
Unless Dues Are
Paid
Sophomore lit officers held their firstj
meeting of the year yesterday in
Lane hall with Vernon Hil'ery, presi-
dent of the class as chairman.
No definite date was agreed upon
for social events, but the functions
of the various committees were out-
lined, and tentative plans made for
both smokers and mixers.
Payment of class dues will be neces-
sary before either a smoker or mixer
can be arranged for, it 'was reported
Robert D. Gibson, class treasurer,
will take dues in University hall at a
date to be announced later. Those
desiring to attend any of the class
functions will be required first to take
care of these dues.
Prof. Lay Tests New Shock Absorber
Prof. Walter E. Lay of the engineer-
ing college is conducting experiments
in the automotive laboratory on a
new automobile spring and shock ab-
sorber, invented by Thomas Morski,
of Grand Rapids.I

Junior lits will elect the chairman
of the J-Hop, according to the rul-
ing of the Student council at its meet-
ing last night, when the rotation plan
that was adopted last spring was held
as being sound.
The junior lits will meet at 4:15.
o'clock Friday afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium to elect its mem-
bers of the hop committee.
Last year the hop was led by an
engineer, this year it will be led by
a lit, and next year the junior laws
will head the committee. The chart
as it now stands provides for lead-
ership for 18 years to come. The
plan that was followed in laying out
the chart was that the number of
times that the affair should be led
by one class would be. based. on tt,
average enrollment of that class. The
lits will lead five times to the engi-
neers' twice, and so on down the list
Reports on the team-send-off for
today were given by H. H. Battin
,21E, chairman of the council com-
mittee. The council was desirous of
having a representative student gath-
ering on hand to see the team off for
its last game of the season.
MANDOLIN CLUB T9 BE
DIRECTEDBy ,THOMAS
At a meeting yesterday of officers
of Union music committees, Frank L.
Thomas, of the School of Music, was
selected to direct the Mandolin club
this year. In order to make the club
as strong as possible, a reorganiza-
tion will be effected at a meeting at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 308 of
the Union. All old club members,
those who have already tried out this
year, and those who still wish to
try out, are urged to attend.
Every eligible man not now a mem-
ber of the club, who has ability on
the string instruments, is invited to
try out. The meeting tonight will
probably be the last chance to try
out for the club, and all men should
bring their instruments. It is point-
ed out that the size of the club will
not be limited in number, but rather
by the ability shown by the try-outs.
Guitar, mandolo and mandolo cello
players are especially desired.
Prof. Pawlowski Addresses Aero Club
The Aero club's "barracks flying"
contest was held Tuesday night at the
Union. Prof. Felix W. Pawlowski, of
the aeronautical engineering depart-
ment, spoke, and members related
I their experiences during the war.

eral chairman of the drive, last eve
ing, "or we are going to fall short
the goal. The easiest work of t
campaign is done, and the final tE
of whether or not we are going to
over the top will come tomorrow."
Team nine, Seward Cramer, '
chairman, is to date the high tes
with a sale of 187 membershil
Cramer, himself, is the high poi
winner thus far in the campaign wi
56 individual memberships.
Competition Keen
Team four, captained by Lawren
W. Snell, Jr., '23, is second with 1
new members; team seven, Frai
Cotter, '22, captain, is third with 14
team five, R. E. Adams, '23, captaJ
is fourth with 140; and team sixtee
led by Maurice Moule, '23, is fit
with 134 sales.
In an effort to win the steak di
ner, the competition is proving to '
very spirited between teams. Exce
for the leading team, the others a
fighting hard for positions. - Of t
five leading teams Tuesday, on
three remain among those in the fro
of the race.
New Men Leading
Seward Cramer, '23, captain of tea
nine, has displaced his teammate,
Davies, who was high man Tuesda
Next to Cramer, who has secured
new members to date, come Guy Wed
hoff, '23, with 50 sales, R. A. Bernar
'23, with 41 memberships sold,
Stark, '23, with 34, and J. B. Witke
'22, with 33 new members.
Not a single high man of Tuesday
soliciting survived yesterday's war
as the first five men in the drive thi
far came to the fore yesterday.
Swimmers Lauded
Featuring the soliciting yesterd:
was the activity of more than 15 mei
bers of the swimming team who we
out working in full force, accordii
to officials. The fact that a succes
ful drive will have a good effect u,
on the alumni, and will make for t
early completion of the swimmi:
pool, is given as the reason for tl
work of the. swimmers.
Today is open day on the campy
Teams are free to solicit anyone
any place during the day, and of
cials believe that the final combii
will put the campaign over.
J. J GARVEY MEETS SENIOR
ENGINEERS; DISCUSSES PLAN

E-ditorial Comment Approves
Propo ed University lBudget

Much editorial comment is being,
made by the press of the state on the
University budget which was made
public Monday. Most of the papers,
taking a broad view of the needs of
the University, give their support tQ
the building program.
The Detroit 'News, in a long editor-
ial on the request, says, "From every
angle at which one may look at it this
sum is justified, and does not in
amount exceed the estimate which any
citizen might make it he were ac_
quainted with the present situation.
Having always been intensely and
justly proud of their Univesrity, the
citizens of this state have never been
slow to come to its aid when it was
once made known to them that help
was needed. Dr. Burton and the Uni-
versity will not request in vain an
appropriation which will enable our
great institution to maintain the es-
teem in which it is held today."
The Grand Rapids Herald says, in
part: "We must, as a- state, either
give the University the new, expanded
equipment which it needs or we must

suffer it to share its national domin-
;on with others, if not, indeed, to al-'
'ow others to pass it and leave it be-
hind. The need of a tremendous- build-
ing and equipment fund at Ann Ar-
bor Is beyond dispute. In dealing with
these things, let the legislature re-
member that it is not primarily a low
tax rate Michigan demands. The thing
Michigan wants is its money's worth
in return for the taxes it gives up."
Suggestion is made by the Herald
that the needs of the University be'
met by increasing the mill tax from
three-eighths of a mill to one mill
after the present situation is taken
care of by special appropriation.
While declaring that, "Every econo-
my that can be made without injury or
crippling must be made," in all state
institutional appropriations, the De-
troit Free Press says that, "President
Burton's estimate ought to receive
most careful and entirely sympathetic
consideration. Any narrow or short-
visioned attitude toward Ann Arbor
would be unfair both to Dr. Burton
and to the state."

J. J. Garvey, of the Western E
tric company, met senior engine
yesterday to discuss employment
er graduation with them. Mr. Gar
will visit the University in the spi
to definitely sign up inen who R
to work with his concern.
EDUCATIONAL CLUB PICTURE
WILL BE TAKEN TONI(
The Educational club will have
Michiganensian picture taken at '
o'clock tonight at Spedding's Stu
All members should be present.

10

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