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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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U4 tr 1 an ifltti
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper .and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless miatter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 wards, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events/will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will-be returned unless the writer inlloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2411
MANAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR

ews Editor.............................Chesser M. Campbell
fight Editors-
T.E H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
3. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
3. 1.Eakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
nday Editor...... .......... .....J. A. Bernstein
litorials.............Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
sistant News .................. P. Lovejoy Jr.
orts .........................................Robert Angell
omen's Elditor................................Mary D. Lane
legraph........................-.............West Gallogly
lescope ......... ..............-................Jack W . Kelly
Assistants
sephine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer L.gArmstrong Kern
ul G. Weber Robert E. Adams Hughston McBain
mena Barlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
izabeth Vickery Byron Darnton Gerald P. Overton
.E. Clark Thomas E. Dewey Edward Lamnbrecht
orge Reindel Wallace F., Elliott William H. Riley jr.
orotly Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

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Al
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G.
Ha

arry B. G~rundly

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.

dvertising .... .............................D. P. Joyce
assifeds......................................R6bt. 0. Kerr
ublication-..............-................'..M. eath
ecounts................. ......i..R. Priehs
rculation......................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
iiund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
ester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. Hamel Jr 0. S. Watterworth

R.
B.
Si
J.

J. s aaw .

The night editors for the week will be as follows:
Monday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Tuesday night,
Thornton Sargent; Wednesday night, Brewster
Campbell; Thursday night, Thomas Adams; Fri-
day night, Jack Dakin ; Saturday night, Renaud
Sherwood.
_ r
Persons wishing to secure information Concerning news for ay
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
bf all news to be printed that night.
;WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Michigan's Library ranks tenth among all the
colleges of the United States in the number of
books possessed. At the end of the last fiscal year,
June 30, 1920, there were 432,800 books in the Li-
brary. This number is increasing at the rate of
i8,ooo annually, of which at least 4,ooo are gifts.
The Library building, which was opened. last
February, together with its equipment, cost $615,-
ooo, but in order to complete the equipment $25,000
more is needed.
THE STATE AND THE UNIVERSITY
-Headlines appearing in newspapers of all sec-
tions of the country announce that the University
is asking the largest budget in its history - $8,69,-
0oo to be secured in two installments from suc-
cessive legislatures, and this appropriation to be
entirely separate from the regular mill tax for edu-
cation. Why is it that Michigan and other state
universities throughout the entire United States,
riot only-feel justified in asking such expenditures,
but go up to their capitals with a reasonable confi-
dence that legislators will look at the matter in
much the same light as the Regents?
The answer involves a complex of business j udg-
ment, sentimental considerations, and sound public
policy. It is as though, in its great and ever-re-
newing mine of human resources, the state had
found like any miner that the raw material of man-
kind, while in many cases dross and incapable of
development, is on the whole as worthy of working
up into the finished product as is copper and gold.
Experience and science have shown that men in-
herit their capabilities, and that it is hard to keep a
remarkable man down even in face of such obsta-
cles as lack of education. But it is just as true that
'capabilities may be turned in many directions; that
many of them may lie dormant forever if not
brought out through the intellectual awakening
which education is bound to create; and that, as a
matter of fact, by far the majority of useful and
great men in all fields have been those whose col-
lege training has enabled them to save time in at-
taining that breadth of positive knowledge and of
human understanding which has been the leading
factor in their success.
The state which accords the recognition of the
open purse to these facts is simply funding itself
for the future. The college man will be a better
citizen, and a power for the state's future public
efficiency; he will be a better business man or pro-
fessional man than he could have been without his
educational opportunity, and therefore a factor in
increasing' the state's wealth; and his training al-
most inevitably will broaden his general culture,
and thereby aid in raising the state's intellectual
standards wherever he comes in contact with his
rieighbors. The exceptions which make their way

into too many headlines are only the dross; and
Michigan could make no finer investment than the
appropriation which President Burton has asked.
THE RED CROSS DRIVE
That enough funds may be raised to permit it
to continue its benevolent, humanitarian work, the
local chapter of the Red Cross is this week con-
ducting a subscription drive.
Always ready to offer its aid wherever it was
needed, spreading its protecting efforts to take un-
der its cover the sick of Ann Arbor, aiding the
needy children of the poor, the Red Cross has es-
tablished for itself an enviable reputation as a
charitable organization owrthy of support. The
world war especially proved the practicability- of the
Red Cross, while at the University its beneficial
work made itself amnifest among the students in
the military units stationed here.
A campaign with a purpose as commendable as
this is deserving of the backing of the student body
as well as Ann Arbor citizens.
WHERE WE'LL BE!
If a messenger should arrive from Mars tomor-
row afternoon to disclose the secrets of trans-.
planet communication there's just one place he
should hope to find the eight thousand students to
be listed in the Michigan directory - and that is
somewhere in the cheering multitude that will see
the Wolverines off for Minneapolis. The entire
University, so far as is physically possible, is going
to turn out with one accord to show the team be-
fore it goes that' although it will be playing six hun-
dred miles away from home next Saturday every
one of us will be behind it during every minute of
the Minnesota game.
Tomorrow afternoon as never before the team
will see a physical manifestation of the loyalty of
the University. Like the team, we are gointg to
finish the 1920 football season "with a punch" and
we feel the "punch" wil be served in the famous
j ug.
THE "M" CLUB'S OPINION
Michigan's "M" club, composed of athletic "old
grads," held a reunion Saturday before the game
and elected new officers. But they did something
much more important than that, for, by expressing
their satisfaction concerning the way in which
Michigan has come back, they showed that the
spirit of the alumni of the University is not only
back of our athletics to the limit, but is also back
of the coach.
The "M" club is composed of men who know
Michigan football, who have watched it through
all its glories of the old days and through its recent
disasters, and their opinons are not to be sneered
at. They are the kind of people who do much and
talk little, they had a great deal to do with this
year's improvement, and when they say they are
pleased with the result it means something.
If we of the student body will always work as
hard and talk as little as the men of this club of
boosters, we are going to see some even more as-
tounding results.
iThe Telescope
Owed to a Stick of Gum
Little lump of grayish matter
Perched coyly 'neath my seat,
Have you mingled with the chatter
Of some lingual athlete?
Were your molar-dented features
Ever sought by lustful eye
As in a drug store window
You sat, ready for some stude to buy?
Time-tried mass, you teach a lesson
Show the woeful, wantom waste
Of'the heedless ones who buy you

'For your saccharinous taste.
To the hundreds who daily write asking how they
too can command large salaries as column conduct-
ors on college dailies we refer them first of all to
our own daily diet:
Eat pickles, drink a quart of hootch,
And guzzle a pint of rye,
Then on a mince pie gently mooch
And wash it down with dye.
This much done, the rest of column conducting
comes comparatively easy.
The other night when we were having a little tiff
with our girl she comes to the fore with,
"I'll tell you, Jack, you men dont' appreciate just
how much we girls mean in your life. Now take
yourself, for instance, what would you do tomor-
row if all the good looking girls in Ann Arbor were
to die tomorrow ?"
She had us there fair and square, so we did the
only manly thing we could do and acknowledged so
by replying :
"I guess the only thing we could do under those
circumstances would be to start running around
with the co-eds."
Famous Closing Lines
"I propse to fightit out on this line if it takes all
summer," said General Grant as he hung up the
receiver after trying to get the correct Ann Arbor
party. NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 19 20
Bet ween
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jaclison
tEastern Standard Time)
Liiated and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Liiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8 :48 p. mn. Ex-
presses at 9:4s a.tm. and e.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
lov&s to Detroit- :55a.m., 7:00 a.in
and ev:ery two hours to 9 :00 p. in.,
ailso 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilani only'
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m-.
LocaIs to JcLkson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

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S S R
14 15
21 22
28 29

NOVEMBER
T W T
2 3 4
9 10 it
16 17 18
23 24 25
8s

F
5
12
19
26

wS
6-
20
27

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I

(Tw o S Ot ores)
Agnts for MOYCROIF ERS

a.
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B1TH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

4
'r rr +' +

Mel: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hai Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

ALL SUITS

SCHOOL
OF DANCING
If you can walk, you can dance
after four private lessons with
MLLE.
JEANETTE KRUSZKA

I

And

Ames Uses Local
Nethods In Drive
With a three column cut of the
Michigan Union on the front page of
the Iowa State Student, a paper "de-
voted to the development of a better
and greater Iowa State college," bear-
ng the date Nov. 12, the issue tells of
the success with which the students of
that institution raised more than a
quarter of a million dollars for a Un-
ion.
The Iowans copied the Union idea
from Michigan and have used the loc-
-4 methods throughout the campaign.
The student body was apportioned out
to be solicited by teams. The success
of the attempt is testified by the re-
sult which shows that nearly 90 per
cent of the student and faculty bodies,
have made pledges either this fall or
last spring.
The amount of money was raised
only through the co-operation of all
the students. The women of that col-
lege have made almost a 100 per cent
subscription record. Pledges have
ranged in amounts from a few dollars
*o more than $100 with the average
about $80 for the men and $35 for the
women. Already $317.550 has been
"aised and $10,000 more is expected
o be subscribed within the next few
days.
137 STUDENTS GET
GOVERNMENT AID
The government at the present
time is giving aid to 137 ex-service
men of the University by giving them
a Chance to be fitted for the particular
vocation they choose. No restrictions
are placed on the course of study a
man may elect. The majortiy are pur-
-quing courses in business administra-
tion, according to F. D. Wahr, local
counselor of the federal board in
charge of the vocational training for
'isabled soldiers. These men are dub-
ject to all University rules and in ad-
dition are obliged to attend the Sum-
mer session.
These men are divided into two
groups. Those in the first group re-
ceive from the government their tui-
tion and school supplies, while those
In the second are entitled to tuition
and monthly allowances of $100, but
forfiet their War Risk payments while
at the University. Married men re-
ceive $135 per month and additional
amounts for dependent children.
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use The Michigan Daily.--Adv.

I

0

OVERCOATS

OR
PHILIP MILLER, '23
LET US PROVE THE FACT
For Appointment Call
PHONE 2308-R
Between hours 12-2
OR AT THE STUDIO
324 E. HURON
Two Blocks West of High School

IAMsa EWE E AT
wNs s
SLAO~4AS~pRf
BRSlLE~
AR3 SILVEii5WflIS AR
DIAMONDS
A Gift of Beauty
Is Joy Forever.
Also a Fino Invetmeut.
Schianderer & Seyfried
113 E. Liberty Street
Ann Arb.r Michigan

i
E

27 %OFF

Wadhams & C.

Two COMPLETE STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

TRADE MARK REQ. '3U.S. A ~

Men's Dress Footwear

SMARTEST DRESS OXFORDS
Nothing smarter for Evening dress, nothing
more comfortable for dancing. Patent or
dull calf as you wish. Every college man
has need for these

PRICE $I11 A

I

Walk-Over Boot
115 South Main Street

Shop

Xmas Cards, Booklets, Leather Goods
M Books, Pennants, Mich. Pins, Fobs, Spoons, etc.

Find them at the ONLY

STUDENTS' SUPPLY STORE
1160-R 1111 South University Avenue,

Phone

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