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November 17, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-17

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ASSOCIATEI
PRESS

PAY AND ) NIaHTlRIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 38. ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1920. PRICE FIVE CEN'
r r

LABORFEERTION
HEARS HOOVERON
S EOF INDUSTRY
BLAME FOR PRESENT ECONOMIC
CONDITIONS NOT ALL LAID
TO EMPLOYERS
LEADERS TOLD THEY
MUST HELP SITUATION
May Frame Policy for Presentation to
Congress from Findings at
Conference
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 16. - Herbert
Hoover, former food administrator,
was called to a conference today by
the executive council of the Amer,
--4can Federation of Labor for a discus-
sion of economic and industrial con-
ditions, presumably for the purpose
of framing a policy to be followed by
the federation that it will urge upon
congress.
Mr. Hoover was invited to the meet-
ing, it was explained, because of his
wide knowledge of economic and in-
dustrial conditions. Members of the
council were disinclined to talk of
the discussion, but there was evidence
that Mr. Hoover's view did not place
all blame for conditions now con-
fronting labor on employers.
Labor Must Help
Mr. Hoover was understood to have
told the conference that labor must
do its share in the elimination of in-
dustrial faults which make for unem-
ployment.
As to the future outlook, Mr. Hoover
made no forecast. He did say, how-
ever, that he believed the existing
economic depression was one of a
temporary nature and that it consti-
tuted a part of the period of transi-
tion from war to peace condition.
Among labor leaders there was a
suggestion that the changing condi-
tions would necessitate changed pol-
icies on the part of organized workers
and particularly of the federation.
Theyindicated they were attempting
to arrive at new conclusions and re-'
shape their policy to the study of
economic and industrial conditions
confronting them as well as the em-
ployers.,
Must Recognize Human Element
President Gompers is understood to
have said to his associates that great-
er. consideration and greater under-
standing must be accorded "the hum-
an element in production" if output
is to be increased and waste elimin-
ated.
Officials of the federation have em-
phatically denied reports that Mr.
Hoover or some other prominent man
was to be selected as the intermediary
with capital in interlabor controver-
sies.
INFLUENA ETPIDEMIC
IMPROBABLE THIS YEAR

MATINEE MUSICALE
WILL MEET TODAY
"The Lure of Little Masterpieces'
for Unaccompanied Chorus" is the
topic upon which Frederick Alexander
will speak at the next regular meet-
ing of the Matinee musicale to be held
at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at
the Michigan Union.
In addition a musial program will
be given including Dinsmore's "Elf
and Fairy," La Forge's "I Came With
a Song," "Berry Brown" by Ward-
Stephens, and an aria of Mozart's, all
sung by Mrs. Percy Potter.
A piano solo by Mrs. Parker Heath,
Hadyn's "Andante from Surprise
Symphony" will follow, and the pro-
gram will close with an Italian aria
and some songs in English sung by
Walter Leary, who makes his first
appearance in Ann Arbor at this
time.
COMMENCEMENT
British Ambassador to United States
Will Deliver Address to Grad-
uating Seniors
ORGANIZES AND EXECUTES
ENGLISH DRAFT DURING WAR
Sir Auckland Campbell Geddes,
British ambassador to the United
States, has accepted an invitation to
deliver the commencement address at
the graduation exercises next June.
according to an announcement made
from the President's office yesterday.
Entering the British army as a
private during the South African war,
Sir Geddes rose to the rank of brig-
adier general. At the outbreak of the
World war, he left his position as pro-
fessor of anatomy at McGill univer-
sity, Canada, for active service with
the English army.
Later he took over the oragnization
and execution of the draft in Eng-
land, and it was through his effective
adminstration that thousands of men
were added to the British army dur-
ing the critical spring of 1918. Pre-
vious to his appointment to the am-
bassadorship -last spring, he served
as minster of reconstruction. Lady
Geddes is an American by birth.
VANDERLIP DENIES CHARGES
OF BEING HARDING'S AID
Stockholm, Nov. 16. - W. Z. Van-
derlip of California, who has been in
Russia seeking concessions for a
western company and who has re-
cently arrived here, issued a state-
ment denying the allegation that he
had been in Moscow at the instigation
of Senator Warren G. Harding in an
endeavor to bring about recognition
of Russia by the United States.
Kenyon Wants Packers Regulated
Washington, Nov. 16.-Senator Ken-
yon, Republican of Iowa, announced
today he would attempt to obtain a-
tion on legislation to regulate the
packing industry soon after congress
meets next month.
Ships Ordered to Black Sea (
Washington, Nov. 16. - Vice-ad-
miral Hughes reported to the Navy
department today that he was send-
ing all available vessels to the Black
sea to evacuate Americans in the

Crimean area.9

MvINSTREL SHOD
OF GLEE CLUB TO
PLAY AT WIT NEY

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT
FAIRS GRANTS PER-
MISSION

AF-

7 HOUSES GO OVER
TOP IN ROLL CALL
Seven houses reported an enroll-
ment of 100 per cent at the close of
the second day of the 1921 Red Cross
roll call of the University women.
Newberry residence was the first to
reach the mark, but was soon follow-
ed by Betsy Barbour, Reynolds, Dun-
lap, Payne, Wheeler, and Kellog
houses. The campaign is under the
direction of Hazel Whitling, '21.
The drive for membership among
the men, which will be conducted un-
der the auspices of the Michigan
Union, will start immediately after
the drive for Union life members has
been completed. The campaign among
Ann Arbor citizens will be held lat-
er in the month.
SOCIALISTS WANT
'FACULTY DEBATE

837 NEW LIFE MEMBERS SECURED
IN FIRST DAY OF UNION CAMPAIGN;
PREVIOUS DRlIVE RECORDS BRlOKE

PRODUCTION'S SUCCESS
ASSURED, SAYS SHUTER
Musical Program Having Been Ar-
ranged, Professor Wheeler Gives
Club First Numbers Tonight
That the Glee and Mandolin club
minstrel show will be held in the
Whitney theater the early part of De-
cember became an assured fact yes-
terday when permission was given by
the Committee on Student Affairs to
hold it there. "This means that the
final factor has been added which will
make the show a big success," said
E. Mortimer Shuter, who is directing
the minstrel. The show is to have
a three day stand.
, It was felt by officials that the the-
ater atmosphere and the stage and
scenery facilities of a strict play
house were vital to the production of
a high class minstrel show.
Musical Program Arranged
Already having arranged the musi-
cal program. Prof. William Wheeler.
who is in charge of the music, will
give some of the numbers to the Glee
lubi at its rehearsal tonight at the
union. The personnel of the singers
is now complete.
Trvouts for minstrel places are re-
norting to Mr. Shuter daily, but he
still needs four clever end men. Any-
one who feels canable of tain such
a. nart is asked to call on him imme-
diately. Clow and soft shoe dancers
Gre also still in demand.
To be sile to comniete the saxo-
nhnnc seytetfe which is to be a renli-
n. of the famous Brown brothers and
-,101 h i to he one of the attaeton
of the sow. a has saxonone nisver
is wn+ed. Othr members of the
group bare -enPn bepn secured.
Will RP TBott Sow
n in charre of flhp nrndintin
-f the show. Prof. William Wheler
'ho is diept n mnusie. E. Mrtimer.
anter. rnsintrel director. Earl V
Monre. director of musical aetivitiep
't the TUninn. and Frederick R. 9tor-
'pr. '2II hairman of the comhined
"i'"hs commitpee. beliove that thi
lr*r's entortsinment will he the best
over given by the Glee club.
Train vs. Snow:
Iron Demon Wins
(By Noah Count)
Struggling through both of the two
inches of snow, the evening train on
the Dummy line achieved an unpre-
dented victory last evening when, in
face of the heavy blizzard, it steamed
nto the station only 1minutes late.
Travellers said that the battle with
the elements-if snow is an element-
was fierce and ferocious. Several
times the iron monster was almost
block tin (stolen from Life), but each
time she shook herself loose.
The terror of the storm did not af-
fect the University in any great de-
gree, although it did start the annual
automobi'e-bob-sled show. You should
have heard them scream when they
went around the corner. Why, ladies!

Intercollegiate Society Prepared
Defend Affirmative Side of
"Socialism"

to

UNPAID SUBSCRIPTIONS
All subscriptions to The Mich-
igan Daily should now be paid.
If you have not paid, please do
so at once. The $4.00 rate is
now being charged in accord-
ance with notices to this effect
which have been given. Please
bring check or money in per-
son to The Daily office any time
between 8:30 and 5 o'clock.
COMMITTEFS FOR,
SOPH LITS NAMU4D
A meeting of the newly elected of-
ficers of the sophomore lit class to-
gether with the committeemen just
appointed has been called by Vernon
F. Hillery, president, to be held at 3
o'clock this afternoon in Lane hall.
The committeemen as appointed by
the president are; as follows: Social:
L. Perkins Bull, chairman; Frederick
S. Randall, Helen Partlow, Fred C.
Johnson, Virgil Tilly, and James
Hume; finance: Norman Damon,
chairman; and George Perrin; audit-
ing: Richard Burchell, chairman;
Jesse Brumbaugh, and Nathan Rob-
trtson.
The purpose of this meeting is to
plan the class activities for the year,
and it is important that every officer
and committeeman attend.
VASITY BNDWILL,
NOT 60 101 MINNESOTA1

LEADERS DESIRE TO SPEAK ]
BEFORE STUDENT AUDIENCE
A challenge to the faculty of the1
University of Michigan has been is-]
sued by the Intercollegiate SocialistS
society to hold a public debate on the
subject of "Socialism." Prominent]
members of the society have expressed
a desire to hold this debate and are]
orepared to defend the affirmative side;
of the question in public against anyI
member or group of members repre-
senting the University faculty.]
Communicates to Daily ;
Harry M. Laidler, secretary of the;
organization, in a communication to
The Daily, states that prominent So-
-ialists throughout the country are1
eager to debate in public on the sound-
ness of their doctrines and that they
prefer these debates be beld in the vic-
inity of the leading colleges of the
country in order that opinions of the
col'ege professors might be refuted.
"Socia'ism is one of the most im-
')ortant problems in .the wor'd today
-nd an understanding of its principles
is essential to an understanding of
the age In which we live," says the
^ommunication from Mr. Laider. "We
feel that one of the best ways to
promote this undertsanding among
college men and women is to give stu-
dents an opportunity to hear the argu-
ments for and against Socialism pre-
sented from the same platform," he
continues.
Can Learn of Society
The letter urges that any member
of the faculty or any organization of
students that is interested in such a
debate or that would care to learn
more about this society communicate
with Harry W. Laid'er, secretary, 70
Fifth avenue, New York City.
33,00E00TAKEN FROM
MAILEXPRESS ,IN IOWA
AMOUNT Mr THEFT DISCOVERED
BY ADDITIONAL POSTAL
INSPECTORS
Council Bluffs, Ia., Nov. 16.-Loss
in the Chicago-Burlington, and
Quincy mail car robbery here last Sat-
urday night will total at least $3,500,-
000, according to a story published to-
day by the Council Bluffs Evening!
Nonpareil. The amount of the theft,
according to the newspaper, became
known today when additional post of-
fice officials came to help local in-
vestigators and when a check of the
insurance of the stolen mail pouches
was made.
One sack whicn was found ripped
open contained $800,000 in govern-
ment bonds, the investigators said.
The bonds wei being sent from San
Francisco to Washington, and it was
believed a larger amount than that
had been contained in the bag.
Officers made a thorough search, but
no more sacks were recovered. Merele
Phillips, 20 year old mail sorter on
the train, is being detained by the of-
ficers.
Ha-vard to Play Centre in Basketbll
Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 16. - Har-
vard athletic authorities announced
tonight that the Centre college bas-
ketball team would play Harvard here
March 7.

CHAIRMAN MAYNARD
PRAISES WORK
MEN

Ni
or

TREMENDOUS EXPENSE
MINNEAPOLIS TRIP
POSSIBLE

MAKES
IM-

PRESENT INDICATIONS DO
POINT TO REPETITION
OF SCOURGE

NOTI

Because of the tremendous expensel
involved, the Varsity band will not go
to Minnesota Saturday. The total ex-;
pense of the trip for the 70 men, ac-
cording to band officials, would ap-1
proximate $4,500, and it is not thought
prudent to make a cut in the person-j
nel of the organization.
To arrive at Minneapolis in time
for the game 'it would be necessary for
the band to leave Ann Arbor Fridayl
afternoon, returning Sunday afternoon
and railroad fare, meals and Pull-
man, would bring the total' to this
prohibitive- figure.
"Although we would, like to send;
the band to Minnesota Saturday to;
help the team on to victory," said H.
D. Lindsay, '21, yesterday, "we feel
that the drain upon the campus for
the necessary funds would be too
much to expect, and consequently we
believe the student body will under-
stand our reasons for keeping the band
at home."
UNRULY FRESH TO
BE DISCIPLINED
Plans for an effective organization
which will act as a representative
body of the sophomore class were
made at a meeting of the Student
council committee on freshman con-
duct last night in the .Union. Its
main object is to see that Michigan
traditions are respected by freshmen
and to discourage mob hazing, be-
sides providing effective discipline for
violators of these rules.
Names of the unruly freshmen
should be handed in to the commit-
tee. A box will be placed at the
desk in the Union where reports may
be filed. The slips should contain
the name, address,.and phone number
of the offending greshman together
with a statement of specific charges.
All reports must contain the name,
address, and phone number of the
student handing in the report or they.
will be considered invalid.
Identification cards have been is-
sued by the Student council to mem-
bers of the committee on freshman
conduct which will give them recogni-
tion wherever they go in discharging
their duties.

TEAM 5, R. E. ADAMS, '23,
CAPTAIN, LEADS FIELD
Interest in Competition Between
Teams Running High, Report
Officials
Breaking all records for the open-
ing day of Union life membership
campaigns, 837 new members were
secured yesterday, the first day of the
year's drive for 2,500 life members
Compared with the number of names
turned in at the end -of the first day
last year, yesterday's total was about
one and three-quarters greater than
in 1919 when 475 were received the
opening day.
Result Gratifying
"The result is most gatifying and
far exceeds my hopes," said Maynard
Newton, '22, general chairman of the
drive, last evening. "The 190 solic-
itors certainly did fine work with
weather conditions against them."
Team number 5, Robert E. Adams,
'23, captain; was the high team for'
the first day, obtaining 96 new mem-
bers. The next five teams in order
are number 7, Frank Cotter, '22, cap-
tain, with 76; number 2, Roscoe C.
Stearns, '23E, captain, with 69; num-
her 9, Seward Cramer, '23, captain,
with 58; number 3, James B. Wit-
ker, '22, captain, with 50; number 18,
A. B. Sharpe, '22D, captain, with 50;
and number 6, Robert Wieneke, '22,
captain, with 45. The remaining 13
teams also turned in encouraging re-
ports.
Davies Wins Honors
Individual honors for the day's so-
liciting go to J. Davies, '23E, who ob-
tained 21 new members. Second place
was won by J. Hume, '23, with 20
new memberships to his credit. Third
and fourth places went to C. R. Pratt,
'23, and Joseph Crabbe, '23E, who se-
cured 17 and 15 new members., re-
spectively.
Interest runs high in the competi..
tion between the 19 teams, say offi-
cials. A steak dinner will be given
by the Union to the team securing the
most new members and to the five
workers who turn in the highest in-
dividual numbers. This will be up-
on the basis of the three day drive,
however.
Lists of prospective life members,
arranged according to their residence
in the city,prove valuable to he so-
licitors. About half of these': were
seen yesterday, and a high percent-
age took out memberships. . The re-
mainder of the .men on the lists will
be seen today, and tomorrow will be
given over to .a general combing of
the campus at large for anyone eligi-
ble to membership who has not tak-
en out a membership by Thursday.
GRAIN GAMBLER CONSPIRACY
BLAMED FOR PRICE SLUMPS
Columbus, O., Nov. 16.-Blame for
the present slump in prices for farni
products was laid at the door of a
"well organized conspiracy on the
part of grain gamblers and some of
the captains of finance," by 0. G.
Smith of Nebraska, president of the
Farmers National congress, in his an-
nual address at the opening session of
that body.,
WESTERN ELECTRIC MAN IS
TO MEET ENGINEERS TODA
J. J. Garvey, chief of the work
training division of the Western Elec-
tric company; will meet electrical, me-
chanical, and chemical engineers al
12:30 and at 5 o'clock today in room
248, Engineering building, to discus
with them employment after gradua-
tion.

Present indications do not point to
any recurrence of the influenza epi-
demic this winter, according to re-
ports from the Health service and the
University hospital.. However, the
Health service considers certain pre-
cautions advisable in guarding against
the contraction and spread of the flu
and other similar diseases.
These precautions are largely a
matter of personal hygiene, such as
coughing and sneezing in public, and
washing the hands before eating, state
local doctors. Plenty of sleep, good
food, and moderate exercise are also
valuable in assisting against the at-
tack of a disease.
Rules for those contracting influen-
za are ' practically the same as for
colds or tonsilitis. A person should
see a doctor immediately after the
contraction of a serious cold. If one
is at all uncertain as to the naturej
of his illness, he should not venture1
out, but remain at home in bed. the
Health service advises.
Strict adherence to these rules
should prevent the contraction or
spread of many of the common win-
ter ailments.

Detroit Alumni To Hear Returns
From Minnesota Game At Smoker
Fred M. Butzel, '97, prominent De- dents are expected to turn out next
troit lawyer, will address the Univer- Saturday for the smoker, at which
sity of Michigan club of Detroit on returns of the Gopher game will be
"The Detroit Community Fund" at the received by special wire direct from
weekly meeting of the organization the playing field. Results of the
at 12:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon game play by play will be given out.
at the Hotel Cadillac. Final details The University Glee club quartet
will be completed at this time, rela- will furnish music, and jazz will be
tive to the smoker which will be held supplied by Ike Fischer's orchestra.
on the afternoon of the Minnesota Food and smokes will be served free
game in the auditorium of the Elks' of charge throughout the afternoon.
temple. Harrly M. Carey, '20, is chairman of
The nature and purpose of the De- the smoker committee. Other men
troit community fund, its true sig- assisting him 'are James O'Dea, '09E.
nificance, and 'the organization be- Jack Watkins, '17, Russel Collins, '17.
hind it will be discussed at length by William W. Hinshaw, Jr., '20, Russe'
Mr. Butzel.- I C. Barnes, '20, and Harold Charles
Several hundred alumni and stu. Le Baron Jackson, '18.

ORGANIZATION NOTICE

All organizations who have
I not signed contracts for the
I Michiganensian must do so today
or space will not be reserved
for them.

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