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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 16, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IICHIGAN DA

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF _MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited irl this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter,:.
Subscription by carrier or nil, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Commnunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily:endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion. f
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR,
News Editor..........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
gT. . Adams II. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J.-I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor .....................J. A. Bernstein
Editorials. .... .....Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News...............................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports ......................................Robert Angell
Women's Editor...............................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph................... ...........West Gallogly
Telescope'......................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer L. Armstrong Kern
Paul G. Weber Robert E. Adams Hughston McBain
Almena Barlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
Elizabeth Vickery Byron Darnton Gerald P. Overton
G. F. Clark Thomas E . Dewey Edward Lambrecht
George Reindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
Dorothy Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

tarry 3.Grundy

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER....-.....LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising................ --..-.-.........-D- P. Joyce
Classifieds............................... ..Robt. 0. Kerr
Publication.......--. -. M. Heath
Accounts.................................. V, R. Priehs
Circulation ..........-.-.........................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. '.Lambrvht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
T. L HameliJr. D. S. Watterworth_

J. ~. ssoaaaa a J a .

I-

The night editors for the week will be as follows:
Monday night, Hugh Hitchcock ; Tuesday night,
Thornton Sargent; Wednesday night, Brewster
Campbell; Thursday night, Thomas Adams; Fri-
day night, Jack Dakin Saturday night, Renaud
Sherwood.
R
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
'TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1920.
-The entire editorial staff and tryouts will meet at
4:30 o'clock this afternoon. The upper staff tviU
meet at 3,45 o'clock.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
According to the mast recent count, there are
49,o43 living former students of the University.
Since Michigan has been in existence 36,oo2 stu-
dents have been given diplomas and 29,086 of
these are living at the present time. The alumni
have given to the University alhost four million
dollars in donations.
THE LIFE MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
The Union drive for life memberships-starts to-
day. Our Alumni have shown that they are be-
hind us by raising funds for the original cost of
constructing the finest building of its kind in the
country.
It is up to u to demonstrate to them that we are
worthy of the support which they have so gener-
ously extended. The most practical proof lies in
giving to the, Union a guarantee that it will not be
lacking in funds to meet running expenses. The
only sure way of doing this is to sign up the life
membership pledge.
The goal set is two thousand, five hundred new
members. With this number of pledges in hand
the Union officials feel certain, although no definite1
promises can be made as yet, that the amount nec-.
essary for the completion of both the tank and the
reading room will be forthcoming.
Weneed that tank ; we need the reading room
and the new tap-room. Without loyalty we can-
not have them. Sign the slip when the committee-
men request it and help the good work along.
THE FOOTBALL TICKET DILEMMA
There is no use in trying to smooth over the dis-
,appointment created by failure of thousands of
students and alumni to secure seats for the Chicago
game in spite of application before the closing
date. Mixups reported to the Student council or
brought to notice in other ways showed that in
some cases the distribution, however impersonal
it may have been, worked unfairness which has
rankled in the hearts of those who believed them-
selves ill-treated. The condemnatory posters scat-
tered around Ann Arbor were unfortunate, but
they arose from a very sincere and deep-seated
agitation against the present system-.
The chairman of the Board in Control of Ath-
letics, in his frank statement regarding the situa-
fion, has freely admitted that a radical revision is
necessary, -and it must be presumed that the Ath-
letic association intends to make a change before
next season. Charges of unnecessary favoritism

and inefficiency in the ticket distribution may' be
unfounded, or based purely on the unexpectedly
large sale for the Chicago game; but a continued
failure such as that of the present season would be
a misfortune which the University would not be in
a temper to abide. It is gratifying to know that
the officials realize the necessity of a change and
intend to create an efficient system.
No one will deny that a number of tickets should
be laid away for certain persons whose service to
the University has been unusuall, either as under-
graduates or as alumni. A man who played three
years on a varsity team, for instance, certainly de-
serves special consideration. It seems that the best
solution lies in publicity. If the officials announced
beforehand-- exactly how many tickets each group
would have reserved for their orders - alumni,
student body, outsiders, and the special group men-
tioned above - stating just where the seats were
located and when the sle would start, a great step
forward would be taken. In as much as the Ath-
letic association is the body most interested in the
matter, it will undoubtedly take steps to prevent a
recurrence of the 1920 dilemma, and necessity will
probably be the creator of a system better than any
we can suggest. the student body is eagerly await-
ing such a change.
WHY NOT MINOR SPORTS?
Although Michigan has, for the past two years,
had swimming, hockey, and soccer teams, and al-
though she has a number of other sports which are
at present apparently noi considered worthy to
come under the title "Varsity," she has been utiliz-
ing material in these branches of athletics without
giving any great amount of credit to the men who
have given their time toward making these sports
successful.
Last year Michigan's hockey team played five
games and won five ; last year, too, the soccer team
won four out of the five games played. Men who
turned out and worked to make those teams suc-
cessful received only numerals as a reward. The
same is true of swimming. Last season we had a
good swimming turnout and, in spite of the rather
poor facilities for practice which naturally ham-
pered the team, the spirit was good and the team
was entered in two meets.
J Just now there are seven branches of athletics
applying for recognition as minor Varsity sports:
swimming, hockey, soccer, cross-country, golf, box-
ing and wrestling. Of these, swimming and wrest-
ling are Conference sports, but under the present
system of the Atheltic association, men taking part
in them do not receive an "M" for their pains.
Cross-country men, it is true, can receive an "M" if
they qualify in a Conference meet, but the most
credit they receive for participation in the regular
dual meets is a "C.C,C."
Naturally there would be difficulties involved in
making a change, but the possibility of forming a
class of minor Varsity sports and thus giving men
taking part in them an appropriate award, would
seem to be a wise and not wholly imptacticable
plan.
Almost to a man the University subscribed to life
memberships when the Union canvassers made the
rounds last year. Michigan's newest class has
shown itself so far to be up to the standard in loy-
alty; this week's campaign will be the final proof
of '24.
Save that throat; you'll need it for the Minnesota
sendoff Thursday.
Illinois was right when she said "The bigger
they are-"
Well, they got some of the scalpers, at any rate.
~ The Telescope

By popular request, we take pleasure in reprint-
ing one of the poems which, on its first appearance
in the Telescope last year, literally took the cam-
pus by storm.
Willie, at the mirror,
Sucked the mercury off,
Thinking in his childisherror
It would cure the whooping, cough.

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

1

DETRO IT UNTED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. M.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.j
Locals to Detroit- 5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p.'m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

Id

1
f 8
14, 1
21 .22
28 20

NOVEMBER
T W T
2 3 4
9 10. 11
10 17 13
23 24 25
30

5
12
1J
26

S
13
20
27

Ch ristmas
Needs
Thought
Let Us Help
QUARRY DRUG Co's
PRESCRIPTION STORE
SO. STATE and N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Phone 308

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Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves =you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Sore, 617
Packard St. Phtone 1792.
PROF. BL&NCH&RDHONORID
Engineering Faculty Man Made Mem-
ber of National Highway Board
Prof. Arthur H. Blanchard repre-
sented the division of highway engin-
eering and highway transport of the
University at the highway research
conference of the National Research
council, held Nov. 11 in New York
City. At this meeting Professor
Blanchard was elected a member of
the National Highway Research board,
to direct the national program of re-
search in highway engineering and
highway transport.
On Nov. 10 he served as chairman
at the meeting of the committee on
road and paving materials, of the Am-
erican Society for Testing hnigineers.
The specifications and tests recom-
mended by this committee are accept-
ed as standards of the American Asso-
ciation of State Highway ofneials, the;
American Society for Municipal im-
provements, and many state and mun-
icipal highway departments.
The Kempt Music Studios -Piano,
Organ, and Voice Instruction. Es-
tablished 1880. 312 S Division St.
Phone 212-J.-Adv.

GRAHA

r

,

(Two Stores)
Agents for ROYCROFTERS

Possibly *you would have bought a
LEA THER COA T before this had the

prices been within your reach

HERE IS YOUR CHANOE
$80.00 Reversible, Wool-Lined, New Price......$M00
$75.00 Reversible, Wool-Lined, New Price......$55.00
$45.00 Reversible, Wool-Lined, New Price.....$3.00
These coats are all REAL NAPA Leather
in Black and Dark Brown Colors
They won't last long at these prices
BETTER SECURE ONE NOW

TINKER.
S. State.

F

ENUS
i.
aLs

&
St. at

COMPANY
William St.

., .ter r' rn rnr.,

,.r

F R the studentOTprof,
-te superbVENUS
rivals Ell for p~erfect pencil
work. 17 ilac degrees and
3 copying.
A.nierican Lead
Pencil Co.
- 2.OFifthAy.
*r I..wYork ' ef
,e7,.4-7.
-.--+- p

I

ARCADE CAFETERIA

UP THE STAIRS

NICKELS ARCADE

0

SERVING HOURS

DINNER: 1I1:30 TO 1

SUPPER: 5:30 TO 7 P.M.

Willie's mother, at the funeral,
Sadly turned to Mrs. Brown,
"'Twas a cold day for Willie
When the mercury went down."
Hot Stuff!
Sign in front of Mai last Friday:
Enid Bennett in "HER HUSBAND'S

II

-s

UNION

[I

DANCES

HAVE BEGUN

FRIED.

I stood on the steps of the Union
And thought of the days gone by,
While a huge lump formed in my larynx
And a glistening tear in my eye.

The discouraging fact that you
are unable to dance graceful-
ly will probably restrain you
from attending your, class
dances.
I will guarantee to teach you
all the modern dances grace-
fully and artistically in eight
lessons.

You can select just the food you want from a
large variety of pure food ("expertly cooked")
which is sure to appeal to your own individual
appetite. Choose your own food and get what
YOU want.
FOUR DIFFERENT KINDS OF ENTREES AND ROASTS
AN ASSORTMENT OF FINE VEGETABLES
THREE DIFFERENT KINDS OF POTATOES
SALADS GALORE, PUDDINGS AND SAUCES FOR ALL

I watched the men stream by me
Each with his bunch of silk
And I sighed for the days that used to was
And left -- to drink malted milk.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, entertaining the neighbors informally," he
muttered as he saw the girls fighting on the front
porch of the sorority house."
NOAH COUNT.

DELICIOUS ROLLS

BREAD

CAKES AND REAL PIE

11

H

JL -

LE VERNE MR
ALSEY'S
STUDIOS I
TH ARCADE,1

FRESH FROM OUR OWN OVENS

C. J. FINGERLE

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